Joe Bonamassa sells a dumble to fund the purchase of yet another burst.....

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Swampash&Tweed, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    Interesting what you said here! and I totally agree!

    I have owned 3 vintage '50s whiteguards (2 currently - the '56 & the '58, traded the '57 for a '68 plexi Bluesbreaker). I have played countless CS Teles and I can recall only one of those, as being in the same neighborhood as the originals. And trust me, I really want to find one that is, AS GOOD, as the originals. Why? So, I can sell the whiteguards and still have something that has the feel, vibe and sound of the originals, without all my money being tied up. :lol:
     
  2. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    ^^^I've played a couple CS Nocasters that were some of the best Tele's I've ever heard/played.

    I played a chambered (!!!:eek:) '58 RI LP Standard in a horrendous cherry sunburst w/ obnoxious flame that is in the top 5 guitars I've ever played.

    Phenomenal guitar. I obviously still think about it.

    I still think about the Reranch rattlecan black I would have hit it with too...:lol:
     
  3. jipp

    jipp Friend of Leo's

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    well i will say im a gear head.. and you can tell the difference in a non molested vintage car and one that has been modded even if just upgraded the original parts to stock standards.. you can tell. but i am a hotrodder so i would take the hopped up model A, instead of a bone stock none molested one.. right now vintage tin is so damn expensive especially 32 ford 3 widows.. ( basicaly hot rodders 59 burst ) or if you into muscle cars ( mopar muscle cars from the 60s, anyone giving out a 1971 challenger with a 6 pack, thanks in advance :p ).

    however, like mention kids will take a supera over a 32 ford. id love a chopped 32 ford, with a nice hemi, 9" ford rear, and some vintage speed parts on the old hemi.
    drools.. now hat stuff is so expensive as the baby boomers go, the prices are gonna drop.. as kids are just not into hotrods like the kids growing up in the 50s.
    wish i live during hotrods peek. id be happy with a model A roadster. been collecting parts to build a bucket T.. maybe one day. but as i get older, and gas goes up.. and i drive very little these days.. who knows if ill ever get into old cars like i use to be when i was working and could play.
    for now my hobbie is this guitar stuff. and thankfully we have good quality stuff for not to much.. so we all can enjoy a little bit of gas.
    chris.
     
  4. cowboytwang

    cowboytwang Poster Extraordinaire

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    Because Chris received the MacArthur Fellows Program "Genius Grant", in 2012, of $500,000 and he instantly had enough money to pick up a couple of Loars.
    To bad he couldn't have waited to become a "Genius" this year, because now the prize money is $625,000.
     
  5. goldtopper

    goldtopper Friend of Leo's

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    He does because he can. I don't understand what's so hard to comprehend about that?
     
  6. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    Yep! I have two LP Historics. One is a R7 from 2000, that I was able to get a Murphy lightweight tail piece for and then a pair of prototype pre-BurstBuckers from the Gibson shop in Elgin before they closed it. Those pickups are really good!! and the Murphy aged lightweight tail piece made a difference too! That R7 now sounds phenomenal. I'm in the middle of selling it to a dear friend that has been Jonesing for it, for years. I think I made his day the other day, when I told him I'd let him buy it. ;)

    I also have a JPP R9 from 2005. It's the Jimmy Page Custom Authentic #1. It's a great custom shop modified R9 LP. The thing with it though, is since it is a Custom Authentic, with a CoA. You can't change anything on it, without hurting it's value.
     
  7. 1962guitargeek

    1962guitargeek Friend of Leo's

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    So, Billy Gibbons is snatching up '58 LP's and JB is snatching '59's...is this correct?
     
  8. keithb7

    keithb7 Friend of Leo's

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    Once I met a guy who had all origianl 1964 BF Pro Reverb. He also had a matching 1964 all original Strat. I plugged one into the other and played them. Meh..Was a vintage guitar sure. I really didn't really have a "moment" based on the tone and feel of the guitar. Now the amp sounded awesome. It sure did, and was worth every penny of $1400. The guitar? It's vintage, collectable and yes has real value based on its age. I don't think the guitar felt or sounded really that much better than my American Series Strat from 2013. The amp? Oh my I should have bought it.
     
  9. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    You should really play more vintage guitars, than just one before you come to a conclusion. :lol:

    Here's a challenge for you, play every original '54 through '65 Strat you can get your hands on, through a variety of amps, like old Marshalls and Fenders. Then report back. Like I said earlier, they are not all great and there are some duds but the ones that are great, are spectacular. What I've found generally speaking, is the ones that have significant play wear, have it for a reason. ;)
     
  10. Mad Kiwi

    Mad Kiwi Friend of Leo's

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    Superbad - I am not sure about your analogy that stocks "earn" money and thus have value versus a guitar doesn't earn money and have value..I would think a history of 40+ years accumulating value (just like good stocks) and being a proven investment is pretty darn close.

    However, My biggest question is about the baby boomer generation. Being one of the 1st of the next generation (child of a baby boomer) I have often wondered about the baby boomer effect on items like guitars, hot rods, vintage cars and have a question to put out....

    Is there any historical precedent for this situation (or something even similar) we can look to and learn from or is this a watch this space, could go either way type deal?

    I have often thought of buying a classic American car/hotrod and semi classic guitars (real classics are out of my price range) for long term investment but cant figure out if the market and thus value will be fading away in the next 20 odd years....

    Thoughts?
     
  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There are so many irrational values and seemingly ridiculous trends in the "vintage" (style) guitar arena that it kind of seems ridiculous to debate which is smart and which is dumb.

    New guitars built exactly the same as 50yo guitars, with little "certificates" stating that they are "authentic".
    Authentic what?

    The same guitars getting beat up by celebrity guitar beaters who sign the CoA stating that no-one else beat up the guitar, so the buyer gets a guitar built with no CNC machining and celebrity custom shop employee beating.
    For an extra $1000.
    They're still making them.
    They're still damaging them.
    Why is the damage so expensive?

    Because it makes them seem like "the real thing"?

    What's so great about "the real thing"?
    Aside from the fact that it was made by hand 50 years ago with now unavailable woods, and beat up slowly while being used to play actual music in the '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, etc.

    OK so not all vintage guitars from the '50s were made with now unavailable woods, and not all vintage guitars got beat up, but for some reason lots of people will pay extra for a guitar that's built like "the old ones", and then in some cases beat up to look like an old one.

    It seems funny that many people that pay $4000 for guitars built like the old ones, scoff at rich musicians who can afford to play the actual old ones.

    What would be better, putting the old ones in collections where they don't get played?

    The prices may be ridiculous, but if we examine the spending of rich celebrities, the prices of their guitars probably fit with their lifestyle budgeting.

    My favorite guitars have been vintage, and not because they were rare or valuable.
    Whatever made them special wasn't in the hype, and now that they are worth more than I can afford to have tied up in them, I don't have many.

    It's too bad that I can't afford them now, it's too bad things aint like they used to be.
    Back when pro musicians wore tuxedos and (if they couldn't afford new ones) got their stage guitars refinished every few years so they'd look new.
     
  12. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    You're only just now thinking about all this? Come on, get with the program. All of this has been stated over and over and over in every Dumble thread on this forum. Give me some more insights to work with. Everybody under the sun has heard the above stuff a thousand times. Originality, please?
     
  13. superbadj

    superbadj Poster Extraordinaire

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    What makes you think I "just now" thought about all of this?

    Originality? If the absurd behavior hasn't changed, why should the words used to describe it?
     
  14. CrisHendrix

    CrisHendrix Tele-Afflicted

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    For a musician I'd think these types of purchases would make more sense than blowing a big wad on watches or modern "art" at least, and hell you could even write them off as business expenses.
     
  15. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A small example is movie memorabilia.

    Still hot - horror movie stuff.

    Not hot at all (and never to come back*) western movie memorabilia.


    Boomer die off affect will be huge.

    A lot of guitars will get ruined and thrown out as well.

    Still more will be "saved" by the dead boomer's family (we can't sell grandpa's guitar !) and subsequently ruined by poor storage/abuse.

    Bottom line ? Supply and demand.

    The demand will NEVER be what it was. Younger folks will balk at old guitars priced at even half their current values.

    The supply is soon to become enormous.

    Plus - families will be happy getting a lot less than whatever the future value of that old Gibby or Fender happens to be because they never knew the values in the past, and getting rid of things in an estate situation is usually seen as a whole - not the value of each individual item.

    Example : "we got $15,000 for grandpa's old Martin !"

    "wow - that's amazing !"

    Reality : it was a 1937 D-28 worth $40-$50,000.

    Relatedly - the only guitars that have actually gone up steadily from pre-crash to now ? Vintage pre-war flattops especially vintage Martins, especially Braz RW ones.

    *could be a rogue "nutty German" effect. Who can even pretend to figure those folks out but they are Western-anything crazy and could affect the market.
     
  16. grant53

    grant53 TDPRI Member

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  17. Swampash&Tweed

    Swampash&Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    LOL........thats worth the whole thread right there! :D
     
  18. Swampash&Tweed

    Swampash&Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    I used to hang with Tony Bruno back in the day in queens NYC. He used to always say:

    A great amp will make a good guitar sound great . A crappy guitar sound decent. But a Crappy amp will never make anything sound good. ;)

    For what its worth , I think Joe has a room full of great amps . The best tones in history were made through these classic amps from the 50's and 60's. As a performer only in his 30's , he is socking away some great investments that he can enjoy for the next few decades. I can't see the Dumbles being worth much more then Joe probably paid. PLUS....Joe got added value for HIS name being attached to them. win/win. I'm surprised another big name player hasn't snatched it up yet. I think Clapton paid around $80,000 for his last dumble. ;)

    For what its worth......I have a Epiphone Joe Bonamassa (1st run gold Top) and its a fantastic guitar. :cool: I can only imagine how cool it would sound through that dumble!
     
  19. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Gee, a working musician who likes to trade gear? Shocking!
     
  20. Del Pickup

    Del Pickup Poster Extraordinaire

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    Let's be honest, amps are nowhere near as sexy to look at as guitars - not even expensive amps!
     
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