Jimmy Vaughan in Wilmington, NC

HootOwlDude

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Just got in from seeing Jimmy Vaughan and his Tilt-A-Whirl band at Kenan Auditorium here at UNCW. Took my son along. Easily the best live act I have seen in the last decade. I don’t get out to shows as much as I used to, but the man puts on a great show, and plays a long-ass time. The band was stellar. It was my first time seeing this full-out pro.
459E5BB6-0D3D-4A64-8D9C-568D6889DFE6.jpeg
Bob Margolin put on a solo set to open which was also nice, but when the boys came out it was on. Highly recommend catching Jimmy if you can. To say he’s the real deal is an understatement.
 

HootOwlDude

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Has the most unique style of playing and very hard to copy . His timing and how he phases are really origional.
Yeah, his tone is just a boldly clean strat with very slight grit when he digs in. Nary a pedal on the floor. Pretty sure he stayed on the neck pickup most of the time, but my eyes suck lately. I was fourth row dead center. He played through two old tweed Fenders. Maybe Pros? Bassmans? I’m sure someone knows. He had a jacklegged-looking cardboard baffle over the face of both, I guess to lessen bleed on the mics, and flipped on the tremolo on one of the amps for a few numbers. He really was excellent and just seems like the nicest fella you could meet. Great pure sound and awesome show. The whole band was great. Old-school goodness throughout.
 

HootOwlDude

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I hope to see him one day . I really like his less is more style . Can't play it like he can but I learned how to do a few things . He also has that tone control wired to the bridge pickup so that he can roll off the highs
Maybe he was on the bridge then—dunno. Anyway, his sound is bright and round. Never even close to ice-picky. Very clear and awesome.
 

Blue Bill

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JV just keeps getting better and better. I haven’t heard him in concert since he opened for EC on his From The Cradle tour, but I have most of his albums on CD. His Baby, Please Come Home is great.
I got to see him on that tour, in Hartford, CT, I think. Also in Hawaii, maybe 8 years ago. I'm a big fan. The first two Thunderbirds albums are still favorites of mine.
 

rand z

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Has the most unique style of playing and very hard to copy . His timing and how he phases are really origional.

Basically, it's Lighnin' Hopkins style of Texas Blues.

It's unique because almost no one plays it anymore.


Tony Joe White kinda messed around with it; but he's gone.

I can do a reasonable copy; but I'm gettin old, too.

It's definately a different style than Delta, Chicago, Piedmont etc., Blues.

Mostly done in/from open E position (that's why JV capos a lot so he can change keys; but still start from the open E).

It usually has a "loping/dragging" rhythm/feel to it; and generally difficult for guitarist's to duplicate.

imo.
 

HootOwlDude

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Basically, it's Lighnin' Hopkins style of Texas Blues.

It's unique because almost no one plays it anymore.

Tony Joe White kinda messed around with it; but he's gone.

I can do a reasonable copy; but I'm gettin old, too.

It's definately a different style than Delta, Chicago, Piedmont etc., Blues.

Mostly done in/from open E position (that's why JV capos a lot so he can change keys; but still start from the open E).

It usually has a "loping/dragging" rhythm/feel to it; and generally difficult for guitarist's to duplicate.

imo.
Yup. He is kinda behind the beat I guess. Super cool, old-school, slightly grimy style. I actually can relate to his soloing approach in that I think I do it myself a lot, though not near his caliber at all. Sometimes he’d play just upstrokes with his finger, at other times he used a pick while going up and down. Anyway—I have always loved his style, though not necessarily from him. Never really listened to Jimmy. That’s changing. I just ordered this triple LP, which is a pretty good representation of his two and a half hour, thereabouts, set yesterday. Perused the tracks on YouTube as well as a plethora of Thunderbirds stuff. This is the best of that stripped down juke-jointy, jump-bluesy sorta vibe he and the boys dished out endlessly last night. Many of the tracks coulda been cut in the early to mid ‘50s. Anyway, I am a newbie fan of Jimmy’s, but’ve always love this stuff. I did not realize what he was about until last night, I must admit. I have been thinking about how killer it was all day.
50252C23-DF30-46F0-9698-1A7DB2683CE3.jpeg
 

HootOwlDude

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Basically, it's Lighnin' Hopkins style of Texas Blues.

It's unique because almost no one plays it anymore.

Tony Joe White kinda messed around with it; but he's gone.

I can do a reasonable copy; but I'm gettin old, too.

It's definately a different style than Delta, Chicago, Piedmont etc., Blues.

Mostly done in/from open E position (that's why JV capos a lot so he can change keys; but still start from the open E).

It usually has a "loping/dragging" rhythm/feel to it; and generally difficult for guitarist's to duplicate.

imo.
He utilized the capo a lot last night, and it was interesting trying to figure out how it all went together. He made me feel better about myself as a guitar player in that I could note how he repeated flourishes from his repertoire of riffs now and then. 🤣 That in no way is a negative criticism: I was thoroughly impressed with his playing, attitude, and vibe. And his singing, too. Not only did he sound a little like his bro (sort of chilling and endearing to hear the blood in there!), but he had to pull away from the mic and cough a couple times after a good yowl 😂😂. That’s a man I can relate to! He was great. 71 years old, still an unapologetic greaser, and just delivering the goods so impressively. I also love how there were zero lighting shenanigans. The lights were just damn on and that was it. The music just expressed it all.

Can you tell I enjoyed it?? I will shut up now!!
 

telestratosonic

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I posted in another thread awhile back about a workaholic workmate of mine who took a week off to go to the Jimmy's week-long blues school at Texas A&M in Austin about 10 years ago. He has nothing but praise and respect for Jimmy and says it was the best money he ever spent. At the end, the class got to play at Antone's and got a video of it. How cool is that!

He has seen pretty much every blues artist of note that came through Edmonton starting back in the 70s. At last count, he had 18 or so stratocasters.

We're all retired now (I'm 73 next month) but we spent a big part of our working years in northern oilsands work camps. My workmate was a workaholic but he never let work get in the way of taking a few days off to go see B.B King, Jimmy and Stevie Ray, Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy et cetera when they swung through Edmonton. Nor would he miss the 3-day annual Edmonton Labatt Blues Festival every August.
 

telestratosonic

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He utilized the capo a lot last night, and it was interesting trying to figure out how it all went together. He made me feel better about myself as a guitar player in that I could note how he repeated flourishes from his repertoire of riffs now and then. 🤣 That in no way is a negative criticism: I was thoroughly impressed with his playing, attitude, and vibe. And his singing, too. Not only did he sound a little like his bro (sort of chilling and endearing to hear the blood in there!), but he had to pull away from the mic and cough a couple times after a good yowl 😂😂. That’s a man I can relate to! He was great. 71 years old, still an unapologetic greaser, and just delivering the goods so impressively. I also love how there were zero lighting shenanigans. The lights were just damn on and that was it. The music just expressed it all.

Can you tell I enjoyed it?? I will shut up now!!
Yes, I can tell! I'm hanging off your every word! Before I actually saw Jimmy, he was just a guy I had heard on a cassette/cd and seen on a video. Being really close to him is a whole other experience.
 

HootOwlDude

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I posted in another thread awhile back about a workaholic workmate of mine who took a week off to go to the Jimmy's week-long blues school at Texas A&M in Austin about 10 years ago. He has nothing but praise and respect for Jimmy and says it was the best money he ever spent. At the end, the class got to play at Antone's and got a video of it. How cool is that!

He has seen pretty much every blues artist of note that came through Edmonton starting back in the 70s. At last count, he had 18 or so stratocasters.

We're all retired now (I'm 73 next month) but we spent a big part of our working years in northern oilsands work camps. My workmate was a workaholic but he never let work get in the way of taking a few days off to go see B.B King, Jimmy and Stevie Ray, Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy et cetera when they swung through Edmonton. Nor would he miss the 3-day annual Edmonton Labatt Blues Festival every August.
Cool story, dude! He really does seems like he’d be the coolest fella to hang with. On top of his awesome playing and truly dope musical preference, he seems like he’s just very down to earth. A workshop like that wouldn’t work unless he was that type of guy.
 

telestratosonic

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He utilized the capo a lot last night, and it was interesting trying to figure out how it all went together. He made me feel better about myself as a guitar player in that I could note how he repeated flourishes from his repertoire of riffs now and then. 🤣 That in no way is a negative criticism: I was thoroughly impressed with his playing, attitude, and vibe. And his singing, too. Not only did he sound a little like his bro (sort of chilling and endearing to hear the blood in there!), but he had to pull away from the mic and cough a couple times after a good yowl 😂😂. That’s a man I can relate to! He was great. 71 years old, still an unapologetic greaser, and just delivering the goods so impressively. I also love how there were zero lighting shenanigans. The lights were just damn on and that was it. The music just expressed it all.

Can you tell I enjoyed it?? I will shut up now!!
Oops! I said "Jimmy" - not "Jimmie". Sorry about that. I was christened "James" but was always called Jimmie/Jimmy and depending on my mood, I always spelled/signed my name as Jimmy or Jimmie.
 

telestratosonic

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Cool story, dude! He really does seems like he’d be the coolest fella to hang with. On top of his awesome playing and truly dope musical preference, he seems like he’s just very down to earth. A workshop like that wouldn’t work unless he was that type of guy.
I agree.
 
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Big_Bend

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I would love to see Jimmie Vaughan live someday, I never have.

Jimmie is 71 y/o now, great to see he is still out touring and killing it.

Its been 32 years since Stevie Ray died in the helicopter crash, I bet not a day goes by where Jimmie doesn't think about his little brother.

These 2 brothers are the best guitarists to ever come from Texas.

Thanks for starting this thread.
 




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