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Jigs using 80/20 T slot (1.5''x1.5")

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by itsmedant, Mar 3, 2021.

  1. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    So I've been slowly setting up my shop to build guitars and started looking into making some jigs. I saw the binding router jig on Stewmac and noticed they are using extruded aluminum (80/20 with T-slots) and I have tons of that stuff from my job!

    I currently have over 100 feet of this stuff in my garage, anywhere from 2 ft to 10 ft long.

    Besides that binding router jig, has anyone else seen jigs that use this stuff? I'd like to use it for more than just building a big table out of it!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I'm sure a real nice router/planer jig can be built using that stuff.

    I used linear rails to build my latest one, but there are so many different fittings and accessories available for the 80-20 stuff that it would probably be easier and cheaper to use 80-20.

    Especially if you already have a pile of the 80-20 extrusions on hand :).

    '
     
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  3. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    You could also easily build a fret board radiusing jig with 80-20.

    You'll need some of the bearings (first choice) or sliders (second choice) that run in the extrusion's channels to control and regulate the linear movement.


    These may not be the exact bearings I'm talking about, but they are similar enough to give you an idea -

    VGroove Bearings (vxb.com)



    edit: If I had a pile of it, I'd find a way to incorporate some of it into the top surface of a work bench so you could have un-limited points for clamping or anchoring work pieces too.

    Here's a place that offers lot's of fittings and accessories for a fair price -

    TNUTZ



    another edit: :) The extrusions will also work real well for building a side bending jig for bending acoustic guitar sides.

    LMI sells a nice side bending jig that uses 80-20 stuff for it's adjustable parts.
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    Last edited: Mar 3, 2021
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  4. erix

    erix Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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  5. gregulator450

    gregulator450 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    The latest version of the Erlewine Neck Jig for setups and fretwork uses a decent amount of this stuff. You can find it on Stew-Mac's website. https://www.stewmac.com/luthier-too...ar-building-and-repair/erlewine-neck-jig.html
     
  6. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    I was thinking about that, but since its 1.5" thick, i figured it would be a pain to counter sink these rails and get them all perfect. Maybe I'm just not looking at it hard enough!
     
  7. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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  8. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    If I had a bunch of it, I'd also build a nice adjustable go-bar deck system with it :).

    Or, add a motor, two pulleys, and a couple of regular wheels and one contact wheel, and build yourself a nice 1-1/2"x60" or 2"x72" (any size you want) custom belt grinder.

    The extrusion system is very versatile.

    .
     
  9. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Use one piece at the front and one piece at the back for edges - no counter-sinking.

    A couple more pieces long enough to span from front to back and a few fittings - you've got a clamping system that covers the entire surface of your bench :).

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  10. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Couldn't you just split it down the middle? I bet you could easily cut it on a table saw. (Although, I would probably get a non-ferrous metal saw blade if I was gonna do a lot of it)
     
  11. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    Oh yea it is! I work in data centers and they use it to build out the hot aisle containment. They had a bunch of it left over and were about to throw it out so i grabbed it.

    I built a vacuum press table for skateboard decks and enclosures (I build electric skateboards too) but tore it down when my bag I got worked so much better.

    I'm clueless here....what is this!?

    I've never tried. My table saw is a recovery as well....almost all of my tools were given to me for free (or traded) and I've had to rebuild them. The table saw is decent....but its not the most accurate saw ever. Not sure how it would handle aluminum but I can always try it out on a smaller piece!
     
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  12. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    A go-bar deck system is just an easier way of holding parts together while gluing, rather than using clamps.

    Really handy for acoustic guitars where you have all the bracing and stuff that spans out across the width and length of the body where it would be difficult to get a clamp on it.

    It uses thin dowels or strips of wood or fiberglass that you wedge into place between the glued parts which sit on the lower deck and the top deck.

    Here's a pic of one sold by LMI -


    [​IMG]


    If I had a bunch of the extrusions, I'd use some of them for the vertical members which could easily give some height adjustment between the two decks.

    The "go-bars" are the rods or strips that you wedge in between the decks and your work piece


    That skate board work sounds pretty interesting :).

    ,
     
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  13. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    Ahhhh that makes so much more sense!!

    Yea, the skateboards were amazing, took over my life though. I had to have a few surgeries on my leg (had 6 inches of my femur removed) so I can't skate anymore. My main board has a top speed of 42 mph (and gets there very very quickly) so taking a fall off of that with my bum leg is no bueno.

    So I've decided to take my shop in the direction of guitar building...I'm about 90% done building a MPCNC (3d printed parts for a CNC), rebuilding a 14in bandsaw, fixing up a grizzly belt sander, and trying to figure out what else i need to build these things!
     
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  14. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    See I got alot of that stuff....

    Here's a quick screen grab from a video i shot on my newest board (before the hospital)
     

    Attached Files:

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  15. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Looks like all-terrain tires on that board ^^^ :).

    .
     
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  16. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    that one has all terrain trucks but street tires...but they are 8 inch tires so they are pretty good on most stuff. I have a few set of tires for mud and dirtier off road stuff.
     
  17. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    I think I just found my answer: https://imgur.com/gallery/rpv2z

    this looks like it would be an amazing bench to work on! A lot better than what I’m dealing with now.
     
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  18. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    That's right along the lines of what I was picturing.

    You could also do more than just clamp with that or a similar configuration :).

    If you place two of the longer pieces of 80-20 in the right place or spacing, they could double as the "X" axis of a router planer jig.

    The support pieces that would slide in them (and also attach to the two pieces that would form the "Y" axis) would need to be tall enough to clear the work-piece that you are planing, or whatever operation you might be performing.

    If all the connections are firm enough, without slop, you could use a router/planer jig as a copier or duplicator, too.

    Very doable - just keep the pieces stout enough so they don't flex, and the connections tight enough so there is a minimum of slop.


    edit: You could make the planing (or whatever) jig so it's easily removable. That way you could clear the bench for regular work. One possibility would be to leave one end of extrusions open so you could slide a planing (or whatever ;)) jig in from the side.



    Make some sketches of your design and prove it out on paper first, so you know it'll work :).

    I make at least as many mistakes as anyone, and probably more than most.

    But on most of my projects, I'll sketch them out first, before I build them.

    That gives me a chance to catch most of the mistakes before they become problems.

    Folks like Leonardo Da Vinci, who was a incredible inventor, always sketched out their work before constructing the real thing. I've looked at a lot of his work , it just blows me away - that guy was a real, honest - to - goodness genius :)

    .
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2021
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  19. itsmedant

    itsmedant Tele-Meister

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    I’ve started trying to draw out plans a lot more now. I read Adam Savages book “every tool’s a hammer” and he talks about the importance of quick and ugly sketches so I started practicing!
    Oh that would be amazing...I think I have a picture of it in my head.

    For the axis, Y would be the length of the bench and x would be the width of the jig right?

    He was wayyy ahead of his time. He sketches are phenomenal too.
     
  20. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    The way I think about naming the different axis' on a router/planer jig is pretty much like the way axis' are called out for a CNC or a manually controlled milling machine where the cutter can operate in three different planes or three dimensions or three axis'.

    The longer path of horizontal travel, or "back and forth" is "X". This would be the lower set of linear rails or extrusions.

    The shorter path of horizontal travel, or "from side to side" is "Y". This would be the upper set of linear rails or extrusions.

    The path of vertical movement, or "up and down" which would be either the height adjustment or the plunging action for the routers cutting bit would be the "Z" axis.



    If you look at the way this jig is built and setup, it might be a little clearer than I can explain it -

    New and Improved Precision Router/Planer Jig | Telecaster Guitar Forum (tdpri.com)





    Pretty much everything that goes on in the world takes place and happens in (at least ;)) three dimensions.

    Everything we do when building a guitar, every operation, is done in three dimensions.

    Even applying a finish is done in three dimensions - the finish has length, width, and depth :).


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