Jazzmaster vs Telecaster For R & B

pbenn

Tele-Afflicted
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On slightly another note, which "kind" of Tele R&B sound is your goal: brass or steel slugs?
And back on JM, didn't Pop Staples have one for a time, and sustain-wise, isn't The Ventures' "Walk Don't Run" solo a JM?
 

Ricky D.

Doctor of Teleocity
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The book of Soul/R&B was written by Teles. Motown, Memphis, the list is long. But a JM can get it done, no question about it.

We are gear heads. We worry about nailing a particular tone. But nobody else worries about that. If you are in the neighborhood, you are right where you need to be.

On a club gig with a good rhythm section and horn section, nobody can tell what you’ve got unless they can see you. Like Ron Kirn always says, if you can play, nobody cares what you’ve got. And if you can’t, it doesn’t matter.
 

IrishBread69

Tele-Meister
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Although it's already been covered, I'll add my voice to the throng as a piece of general advice to whoever is reading this - only ever sell a guitar you really like if you absolutely have to, for the money. Never to buy another guitar.

I'm sure I'm not alone in regretting many impulsive guitar sales.

This is sound advice. Been there, done it, regretted it.
 

Southpaw Tele

Friend of Leo's
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My only two electrics right now are a Player Tele and a Squier CV Jazzmaster. They both have their place and I vote for keeping the JM and maybe modding your ‘83 Tele to get the sounds you desire.
 

dswo

Tele-Holic
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Only ever sell a guitar you really like if you absolutely have to, for the money. Never to buy another guitar.

I think it makes sense for the OP to keep his JM. But selling one instrument to buy another seems, in general, perfectly reasonable to me. I understand the idea of seller's remorse. My own experience, however, is that I end up playing one acoustic and one electric most of the time. It's fun to switch things up, but less fun than just playing guitar. I like the "One in, one out" rule that many people have. Money is one reason, space is another. I believe there are spiritual reasons too, but will leave it at that. If anyone's curious, this article is a starting point: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/03/why-we-are-never-satisfied-happiness/621304/
 

Grateful Ape

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I think it makes sense for the OP to keep his JM. But selling one instrument to buy another seems, in general, perfectly reasonable to me. I understand the idea of seller's remorse. My own experience, however, is that I end up playing one acoustic and one electric most of the time. It's fun to switch things up, but less fun than just playing guitar. I like the "One in, one out" rule that many people have. Money is one reason, space is another. I believe there are spiritual reasons too, but will leave it at that. If anyone's curious, this article is a starting point: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/03/why-we-are-never-satisfied-happiness/621304/
Fair point, can't completely disagree
 

burntfrijoles

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It seems like you have Tele's covered so if you love your Jazz Master keep it. Just don't keep for R&B, soul. While it may work well, IMO it's not the best guitar for that style.


Also, the AO is high up on your wish list then go for it.
 

Synchro

Tele-Holic
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Tucson, AZ.
Keep the JM and find the best tone for what you’re playing and run with it. Same for your Telecasters and your G&L. Find the best tone for each guitar. They won’t sound the same. The settings will be different. A good equalizer like a BOSS EQ-200 will help. But there’s no one right tone for any genre. There are many of them, especially for older musical styles where the guitarist played the guitar he had into the amp that was available. You don’t need a Telecaster for country, a LP for classic rock, or a Gretsch for rock-a-billy. Find a good tone and play your instrument well and it won’t only sound right. It will be right.
Great points. There are perceived alignments between genres and certain guitar models, but these are fairly arbitrary. Jazzmasters are great guitars, and useful in many areas, including, BTW, Jazz. They actually sound pretty good for Jazz, but they also have a twang that strikes me as unique. Between the extremes of the Jazzmaster’s abilities, lies a lot of ground, and the ability to adapt to a lot of musical styles.

A person can think of it like this; there are people who are tall, and people of short stature. Neither is better than the other, and each has both advantages, and disadvantages. But, suppose that you were at one of the extremes, either very short, or very tall; you would live your life accordingly, and allow your talent, imagination and skills to define you.

So it is with many guitars. They each bring their unique personality to the task at hand. If I’m playing my Country Gent, and am called upon to play a smokin’ Rock solo, it’s not going to sound like my Tele with hot humbuckers, but it will sound good. It will be a solo played in a Country Gent, which means that the strings aren’t as light as my Tele, and the pickups sound different, but it still sounds good. Likewise, if I’m called upon to play a Chet tune on my Tele, it won’t sound just like a Gretsch, but it will still be a good sound.
Agree with the others - don't sell Jazzmaster! You can play your style with anything and a JM is a great tool to have in your kit vs. just another Tele type which you frankly seem to have covered.

In other words, your current tool belt has 3 hammers (your T types) and a mallet (your JM), and you seem to want to add another hammer by getting rid of the mallet! DONT. You'll regret it. Save up for the extra hammer if you think you need it.
I like the tool analogy. Every guitar is like a tool. Some are very specialized, and others are anything but specialized. Each has its use. Having a variety of tools, is usually advantageous.

i have a fairly eclectic collection, and my decision of what guitar to play on a given day may be governed by any number of factors. Timbre, response, string gauge, presence of absence of a vibrato tailpiece, even finish color. They are all good tools, and each of them has a lot to offer. Variety is the very spice of life.
 




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