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Jazz Chording on a Tele

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by bottomfeeder, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I love chords with a minor 9th. I use these grips all the time:

    G7b9: xx5464
    C7b9: 3232
     
  2. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    At the tenth fret, the chord probably has the b9 at the bottom (Ab, D, F, B). Sounds fine to me, but of course it depends on what else is going on.
    You could always try G, B, F, Ab, D. That gets the root in there, but it's a crowded fingering and somehow sounds a little more sour. But the b9 is usually a passing/leading tone, so it may not matter. It's all about the context.
     
  3. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    I might add that the closer a chord is to the twelfth fret, the more correct it should be if you're intonating at the octave. Notes closer to the seventh fret are easily pulled out of tune if there's a lot of relief. High frets can have the same result anywhere on the neck if you press too hard.
     
  4. cousinpaul

    cousinpaul Friend of Leo's

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    Hi Joe. Welcome to TDPRI!
     
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  5. albatros

    albatros TDPRI Member

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    Tune by ear with harmonics and you'll be fine
     
  6. joelguitars

    joelguitars TDPRI Member

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    other great jazz players who often play teles.. Ed Bickert, Julian Lage, Bill Frissell,

    Ted Greene.. Audio is terrible but interesting discussion.
     
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  7. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    Welcome to the forum Joe Gore!
     
  8. Edgar Allan Presley

    Edgar Allan Presley Friend of Leo's

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    Someone has probably mentioned this, but are the Rutters compensated saddles compensated for any particular string gauge? You might ask Marc Rutter if your intonation isn't going to work with the gauge of strings you use and the particular pattern of compensation.
     
  9. brians356

    brians356 Tele-Meister

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    Those look like Bill Lawrence blade pickups in the neck/middle positions. I've been meaning to get some for my Highway One Tele.

    I also notice Greene used a 6-saddle bridge. No surprise there!

    I've spent many, many hours in the past week playing with bridge intonation on two Teles: 1) 2009 Highway One w/ 3 Wilkinson compensated brass saddles, and 2) 2004 MIJ Thinline w/ Fender 6-saddle bridge. I'm very particular about intonation, and it's virtually impossible for me to tune a 3-saddle setup as well as I demand for jazz chords. And it's not worth the effort. There's no convincing me that anyone in a blind A/B test can tell the difference in tone between 3 saddles (brass or whatever) and 6 saddles. Yeah, I said it!

    With 3 saddles, you're adding string height to the rat race. Two strings sharing a saddle are both affected by any height change to either end of the saddle. I don't like chasing my tail, and altering string height is just as critical to intonation as altering string length. They're interrelated, so the only practical way to decouple the strings from each other (length and height) for relatively easy intonating is to use 6 saddles.
    -
     
  10. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    I suspect that all compensated saddles are optimized for 10-46 strings. That's by far the most common gauge.
     
  11. Auherre756

    Auherre756 TDPRI Member

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    Some time ago, in a land far, far away, I recall reading about the characteristic dissonant G. It was recommended to tune the G string down 4 cents from standard. I've been doing that (perhaps not exactly 4 cents, but a few cents off of standard) and found my chords sounding much better.
     
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  12. brians356

    brians356 Tele-Meister

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    For one thing, especially with tall frets, it's easy to squeeze a plain G string sharp. One way to allow for this is to fret the G at the 4th fret using typical pressure and tune that B note against a tuner, in theory allowing the open G to be slightly flat. There are endless ways to skin the intonation cat, every artist develops their own formula.
    -
     
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  13. kmaster

    kmaster Tele-Meister

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    I’ve found this thread an interesting read as I have an ASAT Classic and some Rutters straight compensated saddles coming in the mail myself, and I hope to be able to play interesting chords on that combo.

    How are you setting your intonation? What is your method? In general I have myself been unimpressed by any method involving either open strings or harmonics...
     
  14. bottomfeeder

    bottomfeeder Tele-Meister

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    I tune to the open string and then fret at the twelfth fret to get close. After that, I fret each string at different positions on the fretboard to find the "happy spot". I use an old Boss TU-70 tuner which I find to be very stable and accurate. I do think .011 gauge string sets are a help to me in improving my technique related intonation foibles.
     
  15. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    I end up playing in the upper registers quite a bit. For jazz, you may want to consider going to a modern (6 block) bridge so you can zero in each string's intonation. Country players need the spank that the traditional 3 saddle bridge does so well. For jazz, not relevant. Gotoh makes a great six saddle bridge (it'll still twang if you need it too).
     
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