James Burton Signature Tele

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by TCB3, Dec 29, 2019.

  1. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    Has anyone played the latest version of the James Burton Signature Tele? The one with the red or blue paisley flame and three pups? I'm thinking about buying it but am wondering what the neck shape and thickness is like? As well how the finish is as it is poly.
     
  2. theprofessor

    theprofessor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've not tried these, but I was under the impression that the neck shape was the same on all the JB signature models. Maybe not, though. The shape on the Mexican Tele JB from the mid-90's is a U, measuring about

    1.67” wide at 1st fret

    1.99” wide at 12th fret

    .91” deep at 1st fret

    .95 deep at 12th fret

    With 9.5" radius and 6230 vintage small frets.

    Here's a contour gauge of the neck profile that I lifted from another thread on TDPRI:

    James Burton neck profile.jpg
     
    Geo, igor5 and TCB3 like this.
  3. vox Phantom

    vox Phantom Tele-Meister

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    I haven't ever played one I would like to but none of the local music
    stores have any new ones in stock. It's the same with used ones
     
  4. Butch Snyder

    Butch Snyder Tele-Afflicted

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    Buy it and give us all a review.:D





    Seriously......
     
  5. bettyseldest

    bettyseldest Friend of Leo's

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    I have the earlier one, I was under the impression that the neck had not changed, that one is a meaty U shape.
     
  6. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Hate to disagree with the Professor, but the old MIM James Burton Standard has a wonderful, very fat deep shape neck. Kinda a U, kinda a Boatneck.

    While this very fancy, flames model from the USA has a fairly thin, fairly conventionally cut neck profile or section. These two neck shapes could hardly be more different.
     
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  7. theprofessor

    theprofessor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for clearing this up and correcting my erroneous assumption. Certainly nothing wrong with disagreeing with someone who is ignorant (me)!
     
  8. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    Regarding the finish being poly I’m sure it’s the same as any other fender poly finish hard and will be shiny forever and impervious to almost everything
     
  9. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Holic

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    Yes, I also luv Poly for all the reasons you've mentioned.

    :)
    .
     
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  10. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    I'm not a fan of most Fender poly finishes done anytime post 2000. If you have ever refinished or tried to relic one you'll know why. The poly finish is so think it IMO acts like a casket for the wood and buries the tone.
    They also then apply a sealer very thick below that further trapping any wood tones and or breathing being able to be done by the wood.
    I only buy guitars with a nitro/lacquer finish and applied properly/thin. I want my guitar to breath while I'm alive. I typically use the same method many professional players who collect use. I strum an open chord unplugged and grab both the horn and headstock if it doesn't ring/vibrate/express through the wood I typically put it down don't buy it. That doesn't only mean it has a poor finish it could be poor wood choice, and or a bad neck joint. But when those are both good I've seen finish act as a barrier first hand not guessing.
    Also I love aesthetics and nothing IMO looks better than a worn nitro finish and or one with checking. I also prefer lacquer finish on the neck as then with playing I get "tiger stripping" and other cool finish wear on the neck and get to see the wood come "alive".
     
  11. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Guitars breathe?
    That's a first.
    How can wood and especially dead wood breath?
    Elaborate please.
     
  12. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    You took my words a little too literal. But I can tell from your response a few things. One is you may have never worked with wood or worked with those who have. Two is we have a difference in opinion of guitar construction/components/tone which is great. That is what makes the world good diversity of people, thought and opinion. Have a great new year!
     
  13. Rusty Stauffer

    Rusty Stauffer Tele-Meister

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    I owned one for a few years. Really like it. A lot.

    neck shape: medium heft (not fat) D shape meaning shoulders by the fretboard and a decidedly non-V shape rounded back. My favorite neck shape. I dislike v-necks.

    The pickups sound gorgeous. The neck Pu is very sweet and articulate .. telecaster tone with a dash of strat neck tone. The middle pickup was the best middle pickup I ever heard. Never weedy or harsh ... just sweet sounding. The bridge is pure twang and fairly toward the treble end of things... it kept its tone even overdriven. I wasn’t crazy about the bridge pickup frankly as I like some “fattening up” with overdrive. That’s why I sold it.

    The finish was fine but most of us prefer a thinner nitro when given a choice. The basswood body was light weight and super resonant. I’ve read that Jeff Beck prefers basswood on his strat bodies and if true I can see why.

    All in all it is the most versatile and easy to play tele I’ve owned but then it’s really part Stratocaster right?
     
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  14. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    I love that it has a basswood body. I am a fan of them on strats and teles. I prefer it over the typical alder or ash on the strat or tele.
     
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