J Mascis Squire Jazzmaster Whaddya Think?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by StompBoxRacer, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    The frets are jumbo

    After playing this model when my other guitars frets wear out I’m gonna put jumbos on the
    My mascis has about zero fret wear and I play jazz gauge daddarios with a wound g and they usually chew my frets up pretty quickly
     
  2. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Fine guitar, but the only reason to choose it over any other traditionally-equipped Squier JM is for cosmetic reasons, or if you really must have giant frets or the modern vibrato position and Gibson bridge. Other than the frets, a VM gives you the same thing functionally, for 2/3 the price. The modern vibrato position and fixed Gibson bridge is a trick for those who don't like to angle their necks, but if you don't mind angling your neck, it provides no advantage.

    The pickups sound nothing like P90s (other than that both types of pickups produce sound). They are closer to Strat pickups in tone. People who say that JM pickups are like P-90s are listening with their eyes instead of with their ears and their brains. P-90s are steel poled pickups, which have an extremely different construction style, hence a very different output and tone. The similarities between JM pickups and P-90s pretty much end with their basic visual form.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  3. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    I think mine is around 8 and a half pounds it’s not heavy but not light either

    Mine has yet to have any problems with the selector switch and the tuners on it a really solid they are actually better than some of the tuners on my USA fender guitars
     
  4. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    I don’t understand what you mean by angling the neck with the traditional bridge
    I have models with both types of bridges and the gibson style tune o’ matic is preferred by some people because it doesn’t rattle and rock back and forth like the original bridge and the strings don’t slip sideways on the groves
     
  5. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    The Squier Mascis, the Squier Deluxe model that descended from it and Fender Classic Player Jazzmasters all have pickups that are essentially P90s in a Jazzmaster shell.

    IMG_4864.jpg IMG_4865.jpg IMG_4866.jpg
     
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  6. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    The problems with the stock Fender bridge all come from operator error- the stock bridge works just fine as long as you do a basic setup. I use .010 strings and beat the crap out of them, my strings stay put.

    Angling the neck pocket to create greater break angle on the bridge forces you to raise the bridge, which creates more downward force on the strings, which keeps them in the saddles. The rocking bridge is actually an intentional design feature for trem stability- if you don't like it, just wrap your bridge posts in e-tape so they don't move.

    https://mmguitarbar.wordpress.com/2...and-jaguar-pt-2-bridge-over-troubled-vibrato/

    You can of course slap a tuna-matic in there, but then you've put a 12" radius bridge in front of a 9.5" or 7.25" radius neck.
     
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  7. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    I did not know that.

    That said, I was speaking of JM pickups in general when I made the statement, as so many people say "They are like P-90s." I misread those statements in this thread to mean that JM pickups in general are like P-90s, and missed that these particular pickups were being discussed.

    Angling the neck (which leads to the need to raise the bridge) reduces or eliminates the "problems" that people have with the stock bridges. You also want to raise your saddles as high as you reasonably can, so the strings behind the saddles clear the lip of the bridge plate (another source of problems when people set their Jags/JMs up dead flat). On Jags especially (because they are short scale), going up in string tension can help a lot too. Helps on JMs too, though.

    T.O.M.s and the modern vibrato location are cheats to let people avoid using neck angle, as was originally intended for these guitars. They should be set up somewhat like a traditional Gibson, to work right: noticeable neck angle, high bridge, lots of break over the saddles (and they originally came with flatwounds, which tend to run higher in tension – and the flats were 11s at minimum). 1 degree seems to be a generally agreed upon starting point, though I have set some up with 2 degrees, to really accentuate the Gibson-esque feel and make the bridge as tight as can be. These guitars were designed to directly compete with Gibson guitars like the Les Paul, and to be played by professional jazz and studio musicians with a darker tone, light touch, and mild vibrato use. But like the Les Paul model, they were largely rejected by the "adult professional" guitar market, then ended up being taken up by kids making a bunch of loud noise bashing on them with skinny roundwood strings instead...hence the problems with setup.

    On some modern JMs and Jags, Fender routs in a 1 degree neck angle as well (both on models with the old vibrato location and the new vibrato location). No shim required; you have the correct neck geometry right out of the factory. My 60th Anniversary Classic Lacquer has this, and aside from the bridge saddles being a little low, the factory setup was so good – the best I've ever seen on a new JM or Jag (and that's with the old/classic vibrato location). The 50th Anniversary Jags had the 1 degree neck pocket and the modern vibrato location.

    If you are a vibrato user, T.O.M.s make things harder, because T.O.M.s [generally] don't rock. For the JM vibrato to work as well as possible, you want a rocker bridge.

    If you don't use the vibrato, then sure, a T.O.M. could be considered a more elegant and stable bridge for the guitar.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  8. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    JMJMs have an angled neck pocket from the factory, which is a factor of using the taller TOM in the first place as it is about increasing the break angle.

    I still dislike TOMs with vibrato guitars but they can work just fine, because all bridges rock. I don’t believe any amount of locking can stop that from happening. But strings also hang up the the saddle, and that makes for a lot of suck no matter how the bridge is attached.
     
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