I've United The Clans

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by cometazzi, Oct 24, 2021.

  1. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Last month's Spaghetti Sauce and this month's Spaghetti Sauce are having a saucy behbeh:

    [​IMG]


    In the past, I've kept a perpetual stew going from Autumn to Spring. Usually it was a Polish Hunter's stew called Bigos, but some years it's been a regular Beef stew or just an "anything and everything" stew. Since Sketti sauce benefits from long simmer times, I'm going to give it a shot here:

    1) Start with a double batch of sauce, simmer it 2-3 hours.
    2) Freeze half.
    3) Next time I make sauce make a single batch fresh and add previous batch in, simmer 2-3 hours.
    4) Freeze half.
    5) Repeat.

    I don't think this is dangerous. However, if I don't post again in the next 24 hours, someone please call the police!
     
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  2. unixfish

    unixfish Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Now all you need is something borrowed and something blue!
     
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  3. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Friend of Leo's

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    Bigos is in regular rotation here, as my wife is Polish-American. Like it best with chunks of "wedding" sausage.
     
  4. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I have never heard of a perpetual stew with tomato sauce. If you are still posting in the spring, I will look more into it.;)
     
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  5. beanluc

    beanluc Tele-Afflicted

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    It's not dangerous, bringing the new batch to a boil will sterilize the old batch - if that's even necessary. I'm sure you know your safe-food-handling rules.

    This sort of reminds me of one place I cooked at back when I was a professional chef. A couple of their soup recipes were basically - make the soup today, put the whole batch away without serving any. Reheat it tomorrow, then it will be done.

    One night we had run out of soup but a server sold a bowl of it anyway. He tried to make us dish it out of the new pot we had going. "No, that's not done. Tell your customer you're sorry. We're not serving unfinished soup tonight."

    [​IMG]

    OR ANYONE ELSE EITHER.

    Someone start a thread about stupid server stories.
    [✓] Done
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2021
  6. Flaneur

    Flaneur Poster Extraordinaire

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    News to me.....
    7728813898_2297431012_b.jpg
     
  7. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That almost looked like two or three different clans for a second there, but then I realized the guy on the left phoned it in, and the guy on the right is too skinny for his kilt.
     
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  8. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Oh I know, I was just being facetious about it being "dangerous". I was probably high from all the noxious Oregano fumes in the place ;-)

    That's actually part of my strategy too- Freeze half, refrigerate the other half for 24 hours. Basically, I'm making this for the coming week.
     
  9. Cam

    Cam Friend of Leo's

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    Wait, what? Sorry I was just waylaid burping bacon and buttermilk pancakes. I can't remember any spaghetti sauce failures. Looks dang tasty.
     
  10. beanluc

    beanluc Tele-Afflicted

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    Also, can I just say -

    Thanks for not using the phrase, "letting the flavors marry."
     
  11. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Well, I've got Dad's hacksaw and my own pair of blue pliers. Will that count?

    I've never had Bigos made by a real Pole so I don't know if I'm doing it right or not. But that stuff is *magical*. The reason why it's my default perpetual stew is because I just can't get enough of it.

    I'll look into "Wedding Sausage", but I have a feeling some of the Google results will be iffy :eek:

    Me either. It just finished its 3 hour simmer and it tastes wonderful. This is the first combined batch.

    My last gf once made some spaghetti sauce that was basically red-tinged citric acid. Not sure what she did, but she somehow made the tomatoes angry.

    Yeah, I don't like that one either. I prefer to "let the flavors develop a mutually-agreed-upon domestic arrangement".
     
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  12. Flaneur

    Flaneur Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've seen it done, with the Everlasting Stock Pot, in restaurants. Domestically? If my food tastes good, it doesn't last long......
     
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  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I do a bit of that but more like run a soupy dish for several days, adding to it before each meal.
    Usually add fresh garlic and I agree that more time is good but don't agree that all ingredients improve with hours of simmering.
    Peppers I prefer with less cooking time, garlic I like some old and some new for zing.
    So I might saute peppers and garlic to add to the well simmered soup, chili, spaghetti sauce etc.
    Made a small batch of garlicky pizza sauce last night and used 1/3 but put the rest in the fridge for today or tomorrow.
     
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  14. BB

    BB Poster Extraordinaire

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    While I've never united the clans, one day, I did happen to untie the clams.
     
  15. Lone_Poor_Boy

    Lone_Poor_Boy Tele-Holic

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    Sausages and sauce...

    IMG_0832.jpeg
     
  16. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think using canned "tomato sauce" delivers that "red tinged citric acid" effect?
    Horrific!
    My guess is that the tomato in canned "sauce" are more just pressed through a sieve or otherwise puree processed but not cooked much?
    IDK but canned tomato sauce is only used in small dashes here, any dish with large tomato content needs mostly or at least a lot of tomatoes close to whole.
    My favorite is whole canned plum tomatoes of good enough quality that they are actually ripe and all nice & whole as if somebody's Grandam canned them with love.

    There's a jar spaghetti sauce I use sometimes from Vermont called Boves, and at one time I got a Progresso spaghetti sauce in jars, but those are just a base, with good size whole tomato chunks and some sort of puree that isn't that red tinged citric acid nightmare.

    Something like a chili is totally ruined with tomato sauce or puree.
    Has to be whole tomatoes, or a decent stewed tomatoes product.
    I'm not up for using raw tomatoes and I'm not a Grandma either but I aim for Grandma grade!
     
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  18. Lone_Poor_Boy

    Lone_Poor_Boy Tele-Holic

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    We just make sauce and cook the mostly fried sausages in it, then break the sausages up for Calzones and Lasagna and use the sauce for everything. I wish I had gotten into cooking more when I was younger. It is fun getting better though. Gravy is still my white whale though. My Mom was a master.
     
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  19. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    How is that served?
    Ethnicity?
    Veal sausage maybe?
     
  20. cometazzi

    cometazzi Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    You might be right. I won't lie, but I actually used jarred sauces here. That said, I started by sauteeing onion, bell pepper, celery and some garlic in a pan, then adding ground meat (turkey in this case, don't judge), THEN the sauce, and THEN a bunch of spices. I did once make sauce from a giant ole pile of Roma tomatoes and it was way more work than I wanted to do. Guess I'll never be a grandma, gram, abuelita or babuska.

    I wish I had learned how Dear ole Dad made spaghetti sauce back in the day. It was always amazing. He grew up with a bunch of poor Italian kids in PA and NJ so at the very least he knew what good sauce tasted like.

    That sounds amazing. I also wish I had worked on cooking more when I was younger. My mom always tried to show me stuff and get me to help in the kitchen so I could learn some basics, but as an angsty teenager I was having none of it. Shoulda woulda coulda.

    My younger sister on the other hand also denied instruction from Mom, but is an amazing cook. She's the type where she can taste something once and then know how to make it. I don't know how she does it, and it seems effortless to her.

    All of the things I can render edible in the kitchen have been fairly hard-won. I've got a 50:50 record when it comes to making gravy. My white whales are hash browns, 'proper' omelettes, and any kind of baked chicken. The latter was a hill I decided to die on several winters ago, and die I did.
     
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