I've got a beef with the term 'blackguard'!!

allen st. john

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The term "blackguard" was coined at a time when most (all?) production Telecasters had white (or "mint") pickguards.

There's a similar situation in Martin acoustics.
Pre-war dreds are called "herringbones" or "bones" because they had a herringbone marquetry strip near the binding, which was discontinued in the mid-1940s.
Now Martin and other companies make dozens of models with "herringbone" trim, but it doesn't confuse real collectors who prize these vintage guitars.

Fact is that a late 53 blackguard and an early 54 whiteguard are actually pretty similar but the blackguard is worth more because of that piece of plastic, just as a 1946 "Herringbone" Martin D-28 is worth more than a 1947 "non-herringbone" despite the fact that the '46 is more like the '47, and quite different than the highly coveted '39.

I've also got a beef with the term "beef."
There are vegetarians (and bovine) among us.
 

Guitarmadcat

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Colchester, England, UK
..and here's my all-original '56 'Blackguard'
 

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Controller

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So the original blackguards were in charge of the kitchen utensils.

Now there's a career path for you.
 

silentactors

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Jun 22, 2009
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High Point, NC
Very similar to the Les Paul "Burst" isnt it? We all know that the term "Burst" refers the '58 - '60 Les Paul Standards with Sunburst. But how many other Les Pauls are sunburst?

Anywho - just a thought, it really doesnt bother me at all, if its your guitar call it what you want!
 




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