It's got to be a scam, I just can't figure out the who, what, and where of it.

Kandinskyesque

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
1,741
Location
Scotland
It sounds like it might be a variation on the "Brushing" scam which I've still to work out what exactly the perpetrator gains from brushing.

Mrs K and I got "brushed" through our Amazon Prime accounts which consisted of us being sent goods that we hadn't ordered nor paid for.
Several calls to Amazon resulted in nothing, the goods kept coming, unit eventually Amazon told us to forward the order number to them whenever something arrives.

Most of it was useless junk that got passed on to charity shops but Mrs K got some half decent computer peripherals now and again.
I still get infrequent packages with dog turd bags, at one point I decided to review the bags saying that I don't have a dog but found them useful for the cinema.
It's obvious the brushers think more of Mrs K than me.
 

kuch

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Posts
1,708
Location
Great Northwest
+1 on Freezing you credit reports.
It's really simple to freeze, and unfreeze if you need to.

I never click on attachments on emails. I've even called people and verified that they actually sent me an attachment.

Be safe, it's a jungle out there
 

SRHmusic

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Posts
1,874
Location
North Carolina, USA
Yeah, get them to "correct" the subscription to Guitar Player or something useful!

For a long time now you don't need to pay for things you've received in the mail but didn't order. I guess there were scams like that years ago.


The "brushing scans" are related to the digital sites like Amazon. Sellers can claim sales and also write fake reviews "from verified purchasers" for the stuff they sent out like that. Supposedly we can report that back to Amazon or whoever in case they ever get around to dealing with the scummy sellers.

 

rarebreed

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Posts
1,173
Location
Louisville,KY
We've been getting them too, first a few issues of the Town and Country magazine and now we're getting one called Women's Health. Our address but no one here by that name. WTF!!
 

Donnie55

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jul 31, 2009
Posts
1,740
Age
67
Location
Jacksonville , Fl.
Three or four months ago we got an Elle magazine in the mail for a Tess Reichart at our address. Never heard of her and we've lived in this house for over 30 years. A day or so later we received a Town and Country magazine followed by a Southern Living and finally a Cosmopolitan.
It bugged me so I Googled the name thinking it would turn up her correct address. Closest I came was a lady somewhere in Louisiana. I called the magazine distributor to let them know they had the wrong address for Ms Reichart. They were.... uh, accommodating?
We live in a small subdivision and we know every family at least by name. It's not like our address isn't unique, like you could easily mistakenly write our address instead of your own. So, why?
A day or so ago on a local neighborhood forum a lady posted a picture of a piece of mail (A medical bill) with her exact address but someone else's name. She'd never heard of the person and I googled the name; again, no hits.
It's got to be some sort of new scam. Anyone?
 

ChicknPickn

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 16, 2007
Posts
4,406
Location
Ole Virginny
It sounds like it might be a variation on the "Brushing" scam which I've still to work out what exactly the perpetrator gains from brushing.

Mrs K and I got "brushed" through our Amazon Prime accounts which consisted of us being sent goods that we hadn't ordered nor paid for.
Several calls to Amazon resulted in nothing, the goods kept coming, unit eventually Amazon told us to forward the order number to them whenever something arrives.

Most of it was useless junk that got passed on to charity shops but Mrs K got some half decent computer peripherals now and again.
I still get infrequent packages with dog turd bags, at one point I decided to review the bags saying that I don't have a dog but found them useful for the cinema.
It's obvious the brushers think more of Mrs K than me.
This might well explain the knitting hooks and magnetic alphabet game I received a few months ago.
 

Blrfl

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 3, 2018
Posts
2,162
Location
Northern Virginia
It sounds like it might be a variation on the "Brushing" scam which I've still to work out what exactly the perpetrator gains from brushing.

Brushing is a credibility scam carried out by merchants. They create multiple accounts that order something cheap, have it delivered to a random address and leave positive feedback on the merchandise or the merchant. In Amazon's case, a review will have the "verified purchase" tag on it, which makes it appear more-credible than others.
 

ddewerd

Friend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2003
Posts
2,751
Age
62
Location
Willow Springs, Great-State-of-Texas
I subscribe to a handful of print magazines.

I always pay by check - once you do it via credit card it's next to impossible to cancel, plus they bill you at a higher rate.

I keep a spreadsheet (I know, nerdy...) of all of my subscriptions, as well as charitable and political donations. I track the date I paid, how many years I paid for, and the expiration date.

I get so much junk mail offering a great discount (or a free gift subscription for another person), even though I might have 2 years left before mine expires.

Paying by check makes cancelling easy - just don't send it! No phone calls or online hassles.

Never had the brushing thing happen though...

Cheers,
Doug
 

RoscoeElegante

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 19, 2015
Posts
5,117
Location
TooFarFromCanada
Three or four months ago we got an Elle magazine in the mail for a Tess Reichart at our address. Never heard of her and we've lived in this house for over 30 years. A day or so later we received a Town and Country magazine followed by a Southern Living and finally a Cosmopolitan.
It bugged me so I Googled the name thinking it would turn up her correct address. Closest I came was a lady somewhere in Louisiana. I called the magazine distributor to let them know they had the wrong address for Ms Reichart. They were.... uh, accommodating?
We live in a small subdivision and we know every family at least by name. It's not like our address isn't unique, like you could easily mistakenly write our address instead of your own. So, why?
A day or so ago on a local neighborhood forum a lady posted a picture of a piece of mail (A medical bill) with her exact address but someone else's name. She'd never heard of the person and I googled the name; again, no hits.
It's got to be some sort of new scam. Anyone?

https://tenor.com/view/better-call-saul-saul-goodman-jimmy-mcgill-slippin-jimmy-gif-23526361
You have insurance, right...?
 

USian Pie

Tele-Holic
Joined
Dec 27, 2017
Posts
672
Age
52
Location
North Texas
Most likely it's the multi-million-dollar Big Data Machine Learning algorithm bought by a marketing company. It "found" a relationship between pieces of data in a bunch of poorly-managed databases and decided that was a person and an address.

Might want to keep that in mind the next time someone speaks with great certainty about what the "computer models" prove.
 

Jim_in_PA

Friend of Leo's
Silver Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2019
Posts
3,528
Location
SE PA - Doylestown PA
It sounds like it might be a variation on the "Brushing" scam which I've still to work out what exactly the perpetrator gains from brushing.
The business that did the deed creates an account on a marketplace, such as Amazon, that they have access to (that account has your real name and address, but an email and payment method not yours), creates an "order" for a product, sends out something meaningless , and then uses that account to create fake "glowing" reviews for some product they are actually trying to sell. That, in essence, is what "brushing" is...

You may recall a year or two ago when many folks were receiving small packets of random plant seeds in the mail...that was the most visible initial indication that the act of "brushing" had begun to be embraced out there in Internet sales land.
 




Top