Its a different world in the tech field

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by alnicopu, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    This is the thing that's really hard to teach. I learned while finding an excellent lakeside kissing spot while driving my mom's brand new car. I buried that new 70 Fairlane up to the axle. It had to come out. I spent the whole rest of that date using the jack, trees, gravel and blood to get it up on dry dirt.

    Being good at anything is almost determinable by how determined, committed and willing to learn someone is. I think the best way to learn is hang with that kind of people and pay attention.

    Having said that, I've known some real eager young guys and it's a joy to watch them absorb abstract mindsets that you've developed over the years. For instance, when you enter an equpment/machine room it's good to learn to listen and smell for certain noises and odors that can tell you as much as a gauge. Millions of things like that are just the tools of the trade.

    But overall? Yeah...I get your gist. :(
     
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  2. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    sorry, this postdidn't work
     
  3. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. src9000

    src9000 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Troubleshooting is a skill that probably can be learned, but it seems one's has to have a back for it to start with.
    I know I'm not the smartest guy around, but I'm a very good troubleshooter. Once I can get a picture in my head of how the pieces fit, I can figure out what wrong, or who you would need to sort things out.

    It always surprises me when I meet grown men who don't know how to use a screw driver.

    But yes, standards have declined to scary levels.
     
  5. alnicopu

    alnicopu Friend of Leo's

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    I took a call escalation today. A machine said right on the screen “network I/O pca not initializing”. I said, “did you check the connections”, he said no, so I told him to unplug and reconnect all the cables to the board and it fixed it...And he was an actual college educated ENGINEER!!! I swear, I don’t know how some of these guys get dressed in the morning.
     
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  6. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Does the operator not own anything with a board? Hell...sometime my guitar playing sucks. I'm so indoctrinated with the reboot mentality that I switch my amp off and back on...I always sound better.:D
     
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  7. Torz Johnson

    Torz Johnson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I mostly work on PBXs, Voice mail systems, etc. Sometimes the challenge is finding out exactly what the problem is, since my customers try to provide their own diagnosis (which is usually wrong), completely misinterpret what they're experiencing, or flat-out lie in order to make the problem sound much worse in the hopes that it will get them to the head of the line.

    Oh yeah, and when people claim something "just happened" by itself, they don't realize that I can tell that they did it. People think technical stuff is so complicated that nobody can really know what happened. :D
     
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  8. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Like plcs and distributed controls systems. No. My wife did.
     
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  9. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Oh, I could tell stories all night...

    These days I'm a maintenance man in a small factory. Ninety percent of my work is mechanical, but my number one talent is electronics. Nobody else in the department has any technical training, so it falls on me to figure out anything more complex than a bad switch or blown fuse. Fair enough, I get paid well for what I do. But, I can't tell you how many times I've been called in on an 'emergency' just to push a reset button or reboot a computer. I like those jobs, it generally takes longer to get into and out of my safety gear than it takes to do the job. I get four hours of call-in pay for ten minutes work, and I look like a fricken genius.
     
  10. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Friend of Leo's

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    The really frustrating part for me is that I do service calls for several different manufacturers. Since i am closer than their own techs if the trouble is in the Midwest. Most are great to work with. But there is this one ! I get onsite and when I call in to their service dept I have to go through their customer service procedure staffed by people who's only knowledge is to run through a yes or no diagram sheet with boilerplate responses before they will transfer me to the people who will actually send me a component that needs replaced.

    I charge accordingly in those instances !
     
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  11. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes! And also nobody knows how to repair VCRs anymore. WTH?
     
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  12. Torz Johnson

    Torz Johnson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    My favorites are overnight power outages that deplete the UPS. In the morning the customer freaks out and calls in an emergency.

    Only a trained tech can look at the rack full of powerless equipment and use deductive reasoning to pinpoint the problem... and press that "on" switch. :lol:
     
  13. ifallalot

    ifallalot Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I'm a broadcast engineer and its the same way. The old guys can do component level repair, but younger guys like me don't have the skills to do anything more than board level. I know my limits, and I like to try and practice, but I simply don't get the reps in to get enough practice.
     
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  14. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    And then there is the intermittent electronic problem . Generally speaking , you can't fix something that isn't broken . These problems are where common sense aligns with experience . This skill can only be acquired over time simply because of the experience factor . The repair person is at a real disadvantage when they don't know the track record of a system designed before they were born . In time , they will hopefully learn with or without a mentor .
     
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  15. Lonn

    Lonn Friend of Leo's

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    "but sometimes simple common sense often eludes even the smartest folks."

    Genius statement right there.
     
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  16. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    I'm in the live sound industry, and our systems are getting increasingly complex and IT-oriented.

    Recently, I had two guys out with a Yamaha RIO digital snake as part of a Dante audio network. Got a call- the console can see the wireless mics, but can't connect to them. I told them to check their connections, as that particular rig had recently been parted out for a larger job then reassembled- the shop guys might have mispatched something. I didn't hear anything else, and figured they'd fixed it. That night, the tech director for that gig texted me, complaining that it'd taken the audio crew 8 hours to get signal from stage to FOH (which is like saying it took 8 hours to plug your iPad into your computer). It turns out they'd never gotten it working, and ran the system analog instead. They'd even called another senior tech, and he gave them the same advice I did.

    When it got back to the shop, I opened the back of the rack and reversed two ethernet cables. Total troubleshooting time, 90 seconds. Worked fine after that. The problem is, kids today grow up in a world where everything is virtually controlled- all problems are solved with a keyboard and a mouse, touching things in the real world isn't a natural reaction to them the way it is for us geezers. When I started in the industry, a "roadie" was a biker looking dude who could weld, tie every knot in the boy scout handbook and knew how to use every hand tool ever invented. Today, they're computer geeks in skinny jeans who spend the entire day staring at computer screens.
     
  17. Wrong way

    Wrong way TDPRI Member

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    This is very true. Every circuit out there develops a track record over time of fails common to it, typically 60-70 percent. Now a days there is a lot more resources available for a tech to find this information, but you need the experience to disseminate what is good information.
    Intermittent problems have always been the bane of any tech, electronic or other wise. This is where a newer tech is really disadvantaged not having the long term experience to read between the lines on an intermittent problem when it happens to be working while they're in front of it.
     
  18. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    I try to have patience and look at the failings or shortcomings of others as opportunity.

    When I started in technology and would be in those old school IBM or other classes the people around me almost always had college degrees and often military or formal tech school training before any certifications. That was same when I was first a net/sys engineer and early days of ISP sysop. Now a whole lot of people in those positions have not had that formal education nor have they had the relatively tough measure of the Cisco, Microsoft, Apple and IBM certifications.

    Basically, I work with a heck of a lot of decent people but it seems like wage pressure and dissemination of technology along with levels of complexity and less formal education strain all of this.

    Was college full of it's share of BS? Yes, but in most cases when I'm working with college educated and tech certified people there's better problem solving, ordered thought etc...

    The worst I face is a disrespect for formal processes, education and best practices but again, it's also a whole lot of job opportunity for me. I do my best to hide frustration and make a living as the guy who will read the instructions, collaborate and/or figure out solving the the mess.

    The problems being discussed are in reality a lot of great opportunity right now.
     
  19. Formerblonde

    Formerblonde Tele-Meister

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    As others have mentioned, troubleshooting skills are difficult to find out in the world. Most people lack the rudimentary logic skills to figure out where to even start, never mind completing the job.

    On the other hand, there are people who forge ahead and make the repair impossible because they've done "something" they shouldn't have. I have the utmost respect for people who recognize when they are in over their head and stop before they make things worse.

    These days it's hard to find people who value this type of work. I've seen me bring a laptop [and all the crucial data] back from the dead and I have to hear about how $150 bucks is too much....sheeesh

    FB
     
  20. Sollipsist

    Sollipsist Tele-Afflicted

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    If it ain't broke enough when you started fixing it, just keep at it.
     
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