Is your prized guitar really what you think it is, or, can you handle the "truth"???

Skydog1010

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I'm glad you were able to get all of that out even though after 2 or 3 sentences I began to think about what I would be doing if I were a duck.
I turned down the peregrine falcon off ramp, I fly at a poultry 240mph in a dive and I eat ducks.

I have tried my damnedest to like ERNIE BALL strings but I always go back to D'ADDARIO, and yeah I'm over 65 and don't give a flip about what anyone else does.

Anybody wanna talk about handguns?
CZ and Walther own that high end commercially made market space sans a couple high end Sig's.

I'm done! Where's that quacker?
 

MarkieMark

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This is an interesting angle. Brevity is best, until it isn't. Everything depends on the writer's skill, his/her intent and the context (subject, et al.) Pretty much the same with improvising.

With guitars, it's always the inner child. Once in awhile constrained by outside forces and norms. Not always.
Once in a while, verbose is either entertaining or informative to a level that excuses the word-wall.
Not this time as far as I can tell.

Question is in the title, right?

My Q: Do you think ducks feel cold when the pond is freezing, or do they lack that sense? I mean, they do sometimes ignore it to the point of getting frozen in the ice.
I ponder if they perhaps may simply not really have that relatable sensation.

My feet are cold. Should I burn a cheap vintage guitar or suck it up?
 

eclecticsynergy

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"Fragile"? This is when you wish you'd bought a Martin!
VaIfDOx.jpeg
 

telemnemonics

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This is my 1989 Made in Korea Squier Stratocaster “the Veteran”
View attachment 996032
I replaced everything apart from the body and that said body is made from plywood. In fact it isn't the only Korean made plywood monster that I own.
View attachment 996033
View attachment 996034

BUT regardless of being an eighties “crappy” plywood monster, that strat is my baby. Heck, the Washburn and the Vester are two favorites of mine too. They were the Silvertones and Teiscos from that era.
Love the fine tonewood floor!
Couple nice one piece tops right there!
I was at David Gage's shop years ago and he had a 250 year old Gagliano string bass on the bench for repair.
Not sure if it belonged to a Jazz or Classical player but David worked on all the top string bass players basses (and cellos), and was just the top guy for fixing the finest spruce and maple on earth if in NYC.
Anyhow, I was allowed in the shop and checked out the now maybe $500,000.00 bass.
The spruce top was many pieces of various widths and not even all pieces were quarter sawn!

OMG how could it possibly be any good????

Who was the classical guitar builder? who was annoyed by artists who claimed they required certain species top wood to sound good, so he tricked them with guitars voiced how they wanted but using the WRONG TOP WOOD!
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Nah, it's my style dude...once you're over 65, you can do what the hell ya want!
Joyce didn't wait till he was sixty-five to write a twenty-page sentence. So by all means, chase your dream. If you gotta be you, you gotta be you.

For most of us who want to be read, however, it's usually a good idea to meet our readers at least half-way — if only so they know we're trying.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I’ve read the OP twice.
I’m not sure what we are talking about.
Is the gist of it, “it’s ok to like things even if you don’t expect to”.

If not, please elaborate.
Brevity appreciated.
What I got is that the person who made the instrument matters more than the guitar company the person is working for.

For instance, I have a so-called "Loar-era" Gibson mandolin that was not made by Lloyd Loar. The mandolins he did make are, for many players, the gold standard.

Likewise, Antonio Stradivarius set the mark for quality violins. Two hundred years later, high-end fiddles are still compared to Strads when people talk about how an instrument sounds.

Closer to home, Abigail Ybarra's Fender pickups are the most prized by the most players.

So it makes sense, up to a point. Nonetheless, any particular model of Martin or Gibson or Guild or whatever from a given year is likely to have a fairly consistent sound across the board, regardless of who was on the assembly line.

That's the advantage (or disadvantage) of mass-produced instruments. I've had two seventies Guild D-35s with exactly the same sound, and it's unlikely that exactly the same hands built both.

To illustrate: luthier-to-the-stars Dana Bourgeois worked at Martin for years before starting his own excellent company — but I doubt Randwulf could pick up a Martin and tell us whether Dana's hands had ever touched it.
 
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