Is this fretboard blank usable?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by thecrushr, Jun 1, 2021.

  1. thecrushr

    thecrushr TDPRI Member

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    I think I know the answer but looking for others to confirm or convince me otherwise. I have a gorgeous dark rosewood fretboard I want to use on a current build. Looks almost like ebony. However it is not flat. I have plenty of other boards I could substitute but none as nice looking and dark to compliment the body it is going on. At .25", it will lay flat if pressed and glued but I worry it it will cause problems for the neck (flame maple neck which also may not be the most stable wood compared to say quarter sawn plain maple). One could argue to position the fretboard bowed up and pressing in the frets could compensate for some of the curvature. I also plan to use a double action truss rod. A couple of pics are attached that hopefully capture the curvature.

    So should I go ahead and use it or is that just asking for problems?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I wouldn't use it...but that's me. 10 others will say go ahead...:). I'd use it as a peghead overlay. I want flat material before I start building. If you can't joint it and plane it flat...it becomes something other than a fretboard.
     
  3. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    heat it on the concave side until it bows the opposite direction substantially more than you see it now.. let it cool and sit for about a week.. check if straight or damn close... if so..you're good to go.. but if you want the reassurance of certainly, Marty's approach is correct.. if its a serious project you don't want any "maybe's" looming... go with something that's issue free from the get go..

    r
     
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  4. Laren

    Laren Tele-Holic

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    If you can press it flat then glue will easily hold it.It will be fine.
     
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  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would probably use it. I fret my guitars with the board off the neck and they almost always take a slight back bow which flattens right out when I glue it to the neck. If you glue your boards on before fretting then just level it after its on.
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Scenario for the OP....you are having a neck built for you... Would you want that fretboard used? Using it would depend on your answer :).
     
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  7. kifla

    kifla Tele-Meister

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    ^:)
     
  8. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm in the camp with Freeman, but I wouldn't think twice about using it
     
  9. pypa

    pypa Tele-Holic

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    I agree with Dave. It will be fine. I would make sure the hump is in the middle though, not at the ends. In fact, this tiny amount of “spring” can be a good thing for distributing clamping pressure at the ends where moisture loss and separation can be a minor risk in any glue up.

    The joint should come together with very light clamping pressure.
     
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  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    IMG_2615.JPG

    IMG_2618.JPG

    IMG_2854.JPG

    Guitar was built in 2015. Neck is still perfect.... Didn't even take all that many clamps to flatten it out. If you slot it and then glue it on it will act like kerfing and be even more flexible.

    If you decide not to use it send it to me.
     
  11. Telenator

    Telenator Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I would use it without a second thought.
    If you're really concerned, glue the convex side to the neck. When you press the frets in, any minimal tension will be minimized.
    Ain't no thang!
     
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  12. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah I hate to argue with Marty and Ron, but I wouldn't hesitate to use this myself. I'm trying to remember the last time I had a fretboard that didn't bow a little before it was glued up. It's wood, and it's bound to twist.
     
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  13. unfamous

    unfamous Tele-Meister

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    You can make it work. No doubt.
     
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  14. ghostchord

    ghostchord Tele-Holic

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    Use it for sure. There virtually no stiffness in that direction but once glued onto a neck with a truss rod that combined chunk of stuff is going to be much much stiffer. I imagine it's actually hard to cut wood to that shape while keeping it flat simply because as you cut you are bound to release some stresses. The string gauge is going to have a much bigger influence then this negligible bow. If you took a blank perfectly straight fretboard and cut frets slots in it and fretted it without putting it on a neck I bet it'd bow a lot more than that one, so yeah, you can think about it as compensating for that (not that neither really influence the final stiffness).

    Stiffness is proportional to the cube of the thickness...
     
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  15. rezin

    rezin TDPRI Member

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    I've used an iron with a damp cloth over bowed fretboard with great success. just let it sit for a week to make sure it wont come back.
     
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