1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Is this Dumb?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by WrayGun, Mar 29, 2021.

  1. WrayGun

    WrayGun Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    2,031
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I guess if you have to ask, you already know the answer. But anyway ...

    I’m getting older, and never had a really nice (or even kinda nice) acoustic guitar. I do have a small collection of average stuff (electric guitars, amps, yada yada), that collectively could add up to a single nice acoustic, like maybe my dream guitar, a Gibson Hummingbird (because Keef played one all over “Exile.”)

    Hence the obvious issue: a bunch of average stuff, or one real nice piece that I can pass down to my kid someday?

    Thoughts?
     
  2. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,108
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Location:
    London, UK
    Sounds like you know what you want. Why not?
     
    Fretting out likes this.
  3. AlbertaGriff

    AlbertaGriff Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,872
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Location:
    Canada
    ALL of your electric guitars and amps for one acoustic?

    I wouldn't, but that's me.
     
  4. Bob M

    Bob M Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    2,090
    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Location:
    North of Boston
    Bunch of “average” stuff. I have been down that road. Always wanted a White Falcon. Sold a bunch of stuff to get it. It didn’t improve my life and got sold. These days “average” guitars can be made to play really well. A variety of different guitars is the way to go. IMHO.
     
  5. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,027
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2020
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Seems a bit excessive. What's the rush?
     
  6. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    I bought my son a Fender Duo Sonic when he was 10. He played it a couple of times and went back to playing video games. So, I'm not concerned about passing a guitar down to him. He would probably sell it to buy video games anyway.

    Basically, get what you enjoy and don't worry about passing it down unless your kids are into playing guitar as much or more than you are.
     
    Bob M, Ricky D., Obsessed and 4 others like this.
  7. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,027
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2020
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    This is the only reason I've ever wanted a White Falcon.

    [​IMG]

    I guess he lived in it when he wasn't playing it?

    However, since I'm left handed, that's never going to happen.

    Anyway, the story goes Malcolm took the guitar in for repair, then it didn't sound the same, so he sold it.

    Which makes me a little happier.
     
    Fretting out, Gevalt and WrayGun like this.
  8. loopfinding

    loopfinding Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,176
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2011
    Location:
    europe endless
    I don’t know. I had a cheap fender dreadnought (like just under 200 dollars cheap). Then I bought a low end Taylor and had that for a bit. I sold it after like a year or two because it didn’t get much use (this was before I was into John Fahey type of stuff). I had the fender for a long time, and then my cat knocked it over and the headstock broke off, and I never bothered repairing it or replacing it. I think I was more upset about the nostalgia than the loss of a tool.

    I have two classicals, when I play acoustic I usually play those and play either jazz or Latin American stuff. If I’m doing some fahey or Elizabeth Cotten or whatever stuff I just play it on my electric archtop acoustically. I don’t think I really need a steel string acoustic. It’s just a curiosity for me rather than something I use all the time. If I bought another, I’d probably go for a cheapo parlor guitar like Fahey was using in the 50s before he got the Martin.

    I think it’s okay not to own one. It’s not the law or something.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2021
  9. Dan German

    Dan German Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,402
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Location:
    Left of the Left Coast
    If you’re passing down a love of playing to your kid, the quality of the instrument is secondary. You’ve done the heavy lifting.
     
  10. WrayGun

    WrayGun Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    2,031
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Well, to be perfectly frank, I have cancer, and just starting 6 months of chemotherapy. So who knows.
     
  11. Jakedog

    Jakedog Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,316
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Location:
    The North Coast
    It’s ultimately up to you. Does your kid play? Cause I got caught up in the moment and bought some stuff for that purpose when mine were really young, and they all grew up to have no interest. So all that stuff is gone now.

    My youngest plays piano, and thinks guitars are cool, but doesn’t really have any desire to have one.

    As far as getting rid of all your stuff, does it have to be one or the other? If it does then I’d recommend doing some really deep thinking about it. I know personally, for me, if I could only own one instrument, it would be the nicest acoustic I could possibly afford. I could live without ever playing an electric guitar again if I needed to. I couldn’t live without a good acoustic.

    Is it possible you could just save up for awhile and get a good acoustic while keeping your stuff? Or maybe get one on an affordable payment plan? You don’t actually have to answer me. I’m just floating things to think about. If it doesn’t have to be one or the other, then it shouldn’t be.

    Edit: Just saw your post about the cancer. Sorry, man. In that case, I’d do whatever makes you happy right now, and makes the going better for you. Worry about any fallout later when you get to it.
     
  12. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,666
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2012
    Location:
    Sou Cal
    Epiphone makes an “Inspired by Gibson” Hummingbird that is beautiful and definitely qualifies as an heirloom instrument and it’s not the 4K that Gibson prices their version at. It’s $800.00 and you can buy it from American Music Supply or ZZounds and make up to 12 payments with no interest.
    I believe that with the info above you have a path to acquire a wonderful Hummingbird of heirloom quality.

    Good luck
     
    gimmeatele and Harry Styron like this.
  13. WrayGun

    WrayGun Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    2,031
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Well, my son is 28 and doesn’t play, so it would strictly be more of a keepsake kind of deal. Maybe a grandchild I might never meet would get some value from it.
     
    Torren61 and Jakedog like this.
  14. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,027
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2020
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Sorry, I didn't realise I was dealing with an OPTIMIST.

    Screw the guitar, what kind of car could you get if you sold all your gear?
     
    Torren61 likes this.
  15. effzee

    effzee Tele-Meister

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    248
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2017
    Location:
    Germany
    If you're stressing the pass it down to your kids angle, one collectible item that will increase in value would be the answer, imo.

    But for yourself, I think it's strictly a by need issue. One thing I don't like is "stuff" and clutter. I have a habit of always (well, often) getting rid of one thing when I get a new thing.
     
  16. effzee

    effzee Tele-Meister

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    248
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2017
    Location:
    Germany
    Oh no, I didn't see that before my last post. Good luck to you man! Seriously all the best
     
    Torren61 and boredguy6060 like this.
  17. blue17

    blue17 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    379
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2020
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I guess it really depends how much you like acoustic guitar.

    If I had to choose between the two, I’d keep my Gibson acoustic (Songwriter) any day over the electrics, but that’s just me.

    Also, nothing wrong with wanting the same acoustic as your favorite player, but definitely try out a few models. Gibson’s have a sound for sure. Not bad, but distinctive.

    Additionally, if you do indeed sell your whole collection for this thing, please please get it from a reputable source or new. Not that I think it would be fake, but acoustics depend so much on care and maintenance. I’d hate to have you drop thousands just to find a hidden crack long offer the Craigslist guy is gone.
     
  18. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    6,950
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Location:
    Humboldt County, CA
    Damn
     
  19. GuitarsBuicks

    GuitarsBuicks Tele-Holic

    Age:
    24
    Posts:
    954
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2020
    Location:
    Somewhere between here and there
    I would say that it doesn't matter what level you are at or how long you think you might have left. Every player needs a good acoustic guitar. Our acoustic guitars will stay around long after the electrics are gone in any family. They are also more likely to inspire someone to just pick it up and play it. They are where the songs are usually written. Many of us take them anytime we go somewhere. I carried mine all through high school, community college and undergrad. I thought it would make me the cool guy on campus...that didn't work...too many movies I guess.

    Acoustic guitars don't need an amp, and are as different as people are. In fact, I am a firm believer that guitars have personalities if not actual souls. They learn, and evolve just as we do. If you ever play an older guitar, you can almost hear and the different aspects of each individual player that has spent true quality time playing that guitar. I own a guitar that is approximately 26 years old. I got that guitar from a small mom and pop that is relatively local for me. The man who sold the guitar was very shy and didn't like to play very loud. This guitar also was not very loud. I had to fight it to get a lot of volume, but the tone was unbeatable. It had the fullness and rich undertones that people always claim is the Martin sound, but it wasn't and isn't a Martin. Fast forward about 10 years...Yes I have had it that long, That guitar is now quite loud, but it retains the subtleties that I bought it for. My dad also plays guitar (Both of my parents are still here.) When you play his guitar, as I do on occasion, you can hear and feel him in that guitar. It sounds like him, and feels like him in some ways. You can almost feel his struggles through his life with that guitar. (He had a stroke from smoking and has a major struggle with his nicotine addiction. He was lucky with his stroke and has made a full recovery.) There is also the sadness in that guitar from when he has suffered a loss close to him, like when he lost his father at 22, and the unhealed wound of losing his mother. A good acoustic guitar becomes an extension of you. It can absorb the good times and the struggles, it can be your best friend on a lonely night. If and/or when my time comes, part of my story will live on in those guitars, they will tell the stories when I cannot...even if they cannot actually speak.

    I would also add this post I put on two other threads in the last month or so.

    "I would point to this post from another thread that I made about a month ago.

    "Personally, I believe every player should have a true acoustic of decent quality. It is important for a number of reasons. Starting with it changes how you play because there are no possible effects other than what you can generate with your own two hands. Each one is different, they act different and sound different. It also helps to build strength and dexterity in a different way. As someone who started on acoustic I can tell you that it helped immensely with getting the strength for bends, and true string vibrato. These are immensely important skills to develop without the aid of a Stratocaster's wiggle stick. It also opens up a whole new range of sounds and creativity.

    If you were looking for a really nice guitar that can be passed down to your great grand kids any Seagull, Martin, Art & Lutherie, Landola, Takamine, Taylor, Gibson, Maton, Yamaha, Ibanez or professional series Hohner would be a good choice.

    Those notes aside you can get a half way decent acoustic for $100. Think a brand like Johnson or Austin guitars. If you want something nicer you could go for a Seagull, Art & Lutherie, Yamaha, Hohner, Parkland, Jasmine, Epiphone, or Ibanez Artwood. Those brands all use real woods or real wood in 3 ply laminates. Really nice guitars that provide an heirloom quality instrument that no one should be afraid to actually take out and play. Those brands have a wide range of guitars at a wide range of prices...anywhere from $200-well over $1000. As far as the two Godin (Seagull and Art & Lutherie) owned brands of guitar are concerned any thing you get from them will last generations, even the cheapest ones are great quality, made by people from Canadian woods and they are all real wood. The Yamaha acoustic line is pretty good but you have to get one of them in the $500+ range for anything of really good quality.

    I have never been a fan of Ibanez acoustics in general, but if I was going to buy an Ibanez it would be the Artwood series. They are somewhat reasonable in price, however as I noted, I am not a fan of their acoustics. Another brand to check out would be the Alvarez lines of guitars. Their Masterwork line is in the $500 range. I have enjoyed every Alvarez acoustic I have encountered, however I have never owned one because I have been at my capacity of acoustics for years. Otherwise I would probably have had at least two of the Alvarez guitars I have encountered. I liked them that much...although the guitar budget of a high school student is quite limited.

    Jasmine is the Epiphone of the Takamine line of guitars. They are a decent product, but I would prefer a Takamine over Jasmine. Epiphone makes some really nice guitars in the current era. I wouldn't pit them against a Seagull, but they are definitely a quality instrument. I actually have one of their lower level guitars. They sound good and play really well. My one complaint is that I cannot keep the fingerboard moist enough. every time I get it out it's dry, I like my fingerboards to feel silky, as opposed to like dry wood. Another suggestion, although made in China or Indochina (I dont remember which) is Parkwood acoustics. They have a good sound and a good build quality, but I would not consider them the equal of a Seagull or Art & Lutherie, but atleast they are made out of real wood. On the other hand if you can get your hands on one of the Hohner professional series you could easily have a Martin or Takamine quality instrument for a fraction of the price.

    If you wanted to go for something even higher I would recommend Martin, Maton, Gibson, Takamine, and Taylor. I'm sure you have heard of most of these, they are all the best of the best in their respective designs. Any one of them would be great if you get above the introductory lines. You have to be careful with Martins because the lower level ones are not made out of real wood or plywood. When buying an acoustic, at least make sure it is made out of a plywood or laminate for the best sound, consistency, and durability. Taylor claims that they only use real woods and their price reflects that. Gibson makes some really nice middle and high end instruments, although I tend to prefer Martin and Taylor over them based on their necks. That is really a personal preference though seeing as you stated that you like Strats I think you will probably lean Martin and Taylor over Gibson.

    Takamine is a great high end guitar company, easily the quality equal of Martin, if not better. Takamine makes use of a pointed headstock similar to that of Seagull. Martin, Taylor, and Gibson all use a wider headstock based on a rectangle. The Shape of the headstock makes a difference when considering the action of an acoustic guitar. The pointed headstocks tend to allow for lower action as the strings tend to go straight down the neck as opposed to the rectangular based ones tend to have minutely higher action as the strings are pulled off to the side in order to reach the machine heads, honestly it is hardly noticeable. Maton is the Australian equivalent of Martin, and I have sadly never had the pleasure of encountering one. You hear about them every now and again on this site from our friends down under, and from the famous people from the land of the Wallaby, Keith Urban and Tommy Emmanuelle come to mind. While I'm thinking about high end brands of guitars Landola of Finland is one of the best there is on any continent, I have had the pleasure of encountering several and do own one of them. They are easily the equal of Martin. All of these brands have a variety of lines and pricing.

    There are other options as well. Pick your poison."
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2021
    Bob M likes this.
  20. OlRedNeckHippy

    OlRedNeckHippy Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    4,764
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Location:
    South Jersey (Atco)
    I've fond that if I lust after something I can't afford, and get a cheaper something that I can afford (at the time), I'm never really satisfied, ever. I still lust after the original something, I just have less money and something that does not scratch the original itch.
    Better (for me) to wait, save my nickels, until I Can afford what I really want.

    Recently this happened:
    I wanted a high end compressor pedal. I saved, shopped and read reviews and talked to my peers and and decided I wanted a Wampler Ego.

    Then, a sale at Sweetwater had the Keeley Compressor Plus at $115 so I thought "Keeley is highly rated, good stuff. Get it!" That was about how much $ I had saved up at the time, so I bought it.

    A year later I still wanted the Ego. The Keeley was OK, but it just wasn't getting it, and it was Not an Ego. It was not what I really wanted. I was not satisfied.

    So I saved and saved, and finally caught a Black Friday sale on Reverb where I got the Ego within my budget, and man, it delivered!

    I should have waited, saved more, and got what I really wanted the first time.

    Don't give in. Wait. Save more, and get what you REALLY WANT, otherwise you'll never really be satisfied.
     
    P Thought, Bob M and Gevalt like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.