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Is this a good thickness for a bolt on neck? (Tele/Esquire)

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by frank1985, Nov 10, 2020.

  1. frank1985

    frank1985 TDPRI Member

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    I've ordered a custom preslotted fretboard that will come out between 5.5 - 6mm thick

    I've been advised to order 21mm maple for the remainder of the neck. That's a maximum of 27mm.

    I've read elsewhere that 1" total is recommended for the neck, which is 25.4mm. Will the extra thickness be ok or should I trim back the maple to make up an inch exactly? How much lee-way do I have exactly before it's too thick?
     
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  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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  3. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'd get it down to 1 inch so there's no guessing games when it comes time to route the neck pocket. The neck pocket is typically 5/8ths or .625. F spec.
    If you're building with a premade body and neck pocket measure it's depth, if it's right at 5/8ths then I'd say absolutely get the neck down to 1 inch. If it's something other than that, then you'd probably want to compensate w/ neck thickness or re-route the pocket to exact depth.
     
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    1 inch wood thickness at the heel is the Fender standard with a typical F style bridge with the neck in a .625 deep neck cavity.

    Remember you are going to sand it and apply a finish.

    Wood is sometimes sold oversize and will arrive a bit warped. With oversize wood, that warp can be taken out and still leave you the nominal size you need

    I always buy the wood oversize and maple is a prime candidate for not being perfectly flat from the wood supplier.

    The only neck I have that is undersize is maple that was 3/4" from Lowes. I had to remove the warp first and that left me with a thin neck.
     
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  5. frank1985

    frank1985 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks guys, I’ll do it the right way then, according to fender specs.

    Btw I have another silly question for you; thought I’d ask here rather than start anew thread...

    I have a tele neck with 8.7mm tuner holes; the vintage tuners I bought have 8.75mm bushings.

    I read that drilling larger holes could split the wood, but would that still be an issue with such a small increment?

    The fit of the bushing through the hole is quite tight, but I feel I could probably get it through there with a plastic hammer.

    What is advised?
     
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  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I believe that the vintage hole size is 11/32 inch which corresponds to 8.73mm. I would run an 11/32 bit thru the holes to clean them up. You do not want to have to force the bushings into the holes

    As an aside apparently roasted necks are prone to splitting - Warmoth includes instructions for reaming the holes to fit.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2020
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Vintage press in bushings are supposed to have a bit of an interference fit in the peghead. The splines are what holds them in. Get the closest metric drill bit you can that is a hair less and drill them out preferably on a drill press. Another option is to enlarge the hole for the bushing with a tapered reamer. You can get by with cheaper ones for sheet metal. The taper is different than the official luthier ones though. I check the fit after every 1/4 turn or so.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2020
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  8. WalthamMoosical

    WalthamMoosical Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    I've done this; also, sometimes I've just used a round file to enlarge it a bit. Since the increase in diameter you need is so little, you could also consider wrapping sandpaper around a dowel (maybe 1/4") and use that instead of a round file.
     
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  9. frank1985

    frank1985 TDPRI Member

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    dowel and sandpaper should do the trick, cheers guys :)
     
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