Is there a really decent canned chili?

Jakedog

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Since we've moved on to Italian food, a quick aside which has been long weighing on me...what the heck was Italian cuisine like before the first tomatoes were sent back to Europe in the late-15th Century???
And didn’t pasta come from China? What the heck did they eat?
 

playforfun

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It’s actually really good. As long as you don’t use Skyline/Cinci style stuff. If you’re gonna do that, just grab the cheapest, nastiest, 99 cent jar of store bought pasta sauce you can find and stick some dog food grade ground beef in it. There’s no difference. I mean, a can of spaghettio’s is better than that stuff.
Lol message received
 

trapdoor2

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Ok, just back from Kroger's. Got two cans of Wolf's chili (with beans). I'll go all judgemental on it after we try it. Maybe tonight?
Ok, can of Wolf chili on tap. 2min in the microwave...

Not awful. It smells like chili, has a good consistency. Taste? Meh. It has a burnt component on the back of the tongue...bitter.

Sooooo...add cheese and sour cream. Much better!

At least it isn't greasy or sweet like Hormel. I would eat Wolf over Hormel.

FWIW, Stagg is owned by Hormel.
 

Phrygian77

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Sweet tea is the Devil, Bobby Boucher!

Some parts of the Deep South, they will put sugar in everything. For whatever reason, we ate at a fairly highly rated seafood restaurant in Bainbridge, GA, one time. I'm pretty sure this was just because we were passing through on our way up US 27 to get on I-185. Both their tartar and cocktail sauces were sweet! It was uneatable. Never, ever, have I been anywhere on the Gulf Coast where those sauces were sweet like that.

They do it with greens sometimes too. I get adding a touch of sugar to take the bitterness out of collards and other braised greens. Some folks take it overboard. I want a bumper sticker that says, "Save the sweet for the tea, don't put sugar in the greens!"
 

Jakedog

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Some parts of the Deep South, they will put sugar in everything. For whatever reason, we ate at a fairly highly rated seafood restaurant in Bainbridge, GA, one time. I'm pretty sure this was just because we were passing through on our way up US 27 to get on I-185. Both their tartar and cocktail sauces were sweet! It was uneatable. Never, ever, have I been anywhere on the Gulf Coast where those sauces were sweet like that.

They do it with greens sometimes too. I get adding a touch of sugar to take the bitterness out of collards and other braised greens. Some folks take it overboard. I want a bumper sticker that says, "Save the sweet for the tea, don't put sugar in the greens!"
Sweet tea is bad enough. I can’t even imagine sweet greens. Say it ain’t so.
 

Phrygian77

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Sweet tea is bad enough. I can’t even imagine sweet greens. Say it ain’t so.

My grandmother would make greens with nothing more than a smoked ham hock, water, and salt, absolutely nothing else. Nowadays, I use bacon (sadly, ham hocks aren't easy to find these days), chicken stock, throw in a bay leaf or two, and a little Crystal hot sauce. Smoked sausage works well too. I want a little acidity, vinegar (hot sauce) or lemon juice, to brighten things up. The latter I almost always use on chard or spinach (sour cream works well too).
 

Tarkus60

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Not a can but pretty darn good.

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11 Gauge

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Here's an easier question-- Is there any decent food that comes in cans? I'll give canned tomatoes a pass because they are just an ingredient, but otherwise I'm having a hard time coming up with anything
As a complete meal in a single can? I say no.

If I can assemble it from multiple cans, jars, and maybe boxes and bags, I'll say potentially maybe.

I guess I need to add the proviso to this that I love sardines, and canned is like the only way I've ever had them, although I do know they are basically 'small halibut', and I love full-sized halibut prepared fresh. Anyway, I know that a lot of folks will turn their noses up at sardines, pickled herring, and all that kind of stuff, so 'decent' is highly subjective.

I've also had some of those complete meal dinner thingies that are usually refrigerated or frozen from Costco, and some of them are kind of decent. But that's not really canned, is it?
 

fjblair

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I'm originally from Southwest GA and my Grandmother made her cornbread not sweet. My wife is from Northeast GA and her Grandmother made it sweet, almost cake like. I wonder if it's family traditions maybe more than regional.



I've wondered why some companies label it as "Hot Dog Sauce" instead of "Hot Dog Chili".
I think that is likely, because I don't encounter it very often in the South.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I'm originally from Southwest GA and my Grandmother made her cornbread not sweet. My wife is from Northeast GA and her Grandmother made it sweet, almost cake like. I wonder if it's family traditions maybe more than regional. . . .
Lots of exceptions, but in general, cornbread is sweet in the north and not in the south, and "sweet tea" is a southern thing, not a northern thing.

I like southern cornbread and northern tea.
 




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