Is my speaker damaged?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Jack Clayton, Oct 18, 2021.

  1. Jack Clayton

    Jack Clayton Tele-Holic

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    I've got a weber 12A125A that I use with my 68 custom princeton reverb through an external cab. Sitting in the room with it, it's a match made in heaven. At 20 watts, the speaker breaks up perfectly, and the alnico magnet gives the PRRI just the right amount of tweedish tone.

    But yesterday I took my rig into the studio and we tried to record. It was a no go. The second I pushed the speaker into breakup territory, we were hearing an awful buzz in the midrange. More than enough to make the sound completely unusable.

    The odd thing is that this buzz is barely noticeable standing five feet from the speaker, even when you're specifically listening for it. But miked with a sennheiser e609, the sound leaps right to the foreground.

    My first thought is that my speaker is damaged or blown. The beautiful thing about having a weber is that they will repair it for me for $30 plus postage. But I'd feel silly if I went through that and the problem weren't solved.

    Has anyone encountered this trouble before? Are we doing something wrong in the studio, or do I just need a repair done?

    Thanks
     
  2. corliss1

    corliss1 Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Try running the amp out to another speaker and see if the same issue happens. It could be the speaker, or it could be something else vibrating in the cabinet as well. You'll have to use process of elimination to narrow it down.
     
  3. Jack Clayton

    Jack Clayton Tele-Holic

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    This is good advice I hadn't considered. I have a different head I could play through and make a comparison, and a few other speakers I could swap out to see if the cab is the common denominator. Thanks.
     
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  4. Peegoo

    Peegoo Doctor of Teleocity

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    Another thing to consider: try mic'ing the amp in a completely different room.

    Chances are pretty good there was something in te studio that was resonating and causing that buzz.
     
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  5. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Really have to hunt down the buzz on site, we can't hear it or tell where it's coming from!

    I generally find a "blown" speaker of the buzzing VC kind has a gravely feel when you push the cone in an out, but you have to get to the front of the cone to do that.
    Cabs can buzz too, as well as mic stands and assorted nearby junk.
    Maybe the mic is bad?
     
  6. DrBGood

    DrBGood Tele-Afflicted

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    I vote for a cab glitch. Handle, input jack, grill, baffle, it could be lots of things. As someone is playing a note that makes it happen, press on all different parts of the cab to see it it cuts out the buzz.
     
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  7. Boreas

    Boreas Poster Extraordinaire

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    Possibly something crawled into the back of the speaker and died there. Stink bugs and ladybugs all over my place in the fall. Pick it up and see if anything shakes out of it. Also, look for errant wires or any loose screws/parts.
     
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  8. Chicago Matt

    Chicago Matt Friend of Leo's

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    Good luck with it. The 12A125A is a beautiful speaker for sure. I've been using mine for years in a cranked 5E3 clone (also rated at 12 Watts) with no problem. However, mine's the 30watt version. I suppose it could be pushing it with the 20watt over time if you play your Princeton wide open with added gain in front. Maybe someone here has more experience with that?
     
  9. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

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    At least specific to the cabinet.. get your screwdriver and cinch down any screw, nut or fastener in or on the box. Open the inside and be sure to check everything from that side too. I've built at least one where I *thought* I had everything put together well only to find a nasty buzz upon the first time I played through it.
     
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  10. itsGiusto

    itsGiusto Tele-Holic

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    I have a 1972 Princeton reverb that had a similar issue. I thought for sure the speaker was broken, I thought it was cone cry, sounded just like it. Turns out it's just that the preamp tubes needed to be replaced.

    Try that amp through another speaker, as suggested. And then try another amp (of comparable wattage) through that speaker.
     
  11. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Some Weber's are noted for developing "cone cry" . My understanding is Weber technology uses a very tight voice coil clearance. Part of the magic, but also more risk of developing that issue.
    As mentioned, confirm with another speaker cab first.
    As you likely know, the PRRI's have some buzzing problems. One person solved it by replacing tube sockets, the sockets were rattling in the metal ring that holds them.

    Either way, a separate cab and speaker test should remove the buzz. Then you have to figure if it's the sockets or the Weber.
     
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