1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Is it possible to attend college, while working full time?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by wayloncash, May 18, 2017.

  1. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    10,683
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2014
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Yes, possible. I have a wife and 3 kiddos, a full time job and I'm in school. Well, not anymore I needed a break. Expect everyone to forgive your neglect; your neglect of friendships, your marriage, your relationship with coworkers and kids. Forget social life, unless you like to watch things fold up quicker than a house of cards. It takes dedication but it can be done.
     
    Milspec likes this.
  2. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,627
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2014
    Location:
    Pahrump, nv
    I tried it. I lasted half a quarter, and that was with the GI bill. I was going to school 5 days a week 7-12 and working 6-7 hour shifts 6 days a week. Had 2 kids at the time. It was exhausting, and naturally school was the thing that had to go.

    I still intend to go back to school but I'm going to do an online or night course.
     
  3. elmoscafeo

    elmoscafeo Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    59
    Posts:
    1,467
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    Go to your local college and inquire about placement tests and CLEP. They'll be able to guide you through it and determine which credits you can use, which are duplicates, etc. I was able to CLEP 62 credits.

    https://clep.collegeboard.org/
     
    Flakey likes this.
  4. wayloncash

    wayloncash Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,735
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2012
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    UPDATE: I spoke with advisor, took my placement tests and am currently completing finacial aid and registering for classes. Just waiting on tax info from irs. Hoping to start fall classes.
    Pretty anxious about the whole thing.
     
  5. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,793
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    Older students are sometimes pretty good at finding other ways to accomplish the same thing. Someone mentioned doing an independent study project. Oh yeah. We had a grad student a number of years ago, who tried to do her coursework by substituting independent study projects. No can do.

    After you've been around and learned the ropes, you'll be a heck of a lot wiser than your younger classmates, who don't pay attention to the same sorts of things that 30-year olds do. It is common to see older students sort of game the system a little.
     
    Flakey and wayloncash like this.
  6. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    2,312
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Location:
    Branson, Mo
    Because college has become so expensive, I recommend getting a job with the university that has the engineering program that you want. Then you will get heavily discounted tuition and good health benefits and you'll be on campus, saving commuting time and parking woes. You might end up with a technician job in an engineering department or working to maintain the university's physical facilities.
     
    Flakey, Larry F, Matt G and 1 other person like this.
  7. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,377
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    My cousin became a medical doctor at 40 and my nephew graduated law school at 41.

    You can do it, maybe move to one of the states that are starting free college for adults (I
    think Tenn, and a couple of others will soon have it).

    Let us know how things work out.
     
    wayloncash likes this.
  8. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,272
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    YES!

    Best advice ever.
     
  9. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,793
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    There is merit to this. Professors are not the only employees that enjoy a positive work environment, great benefits, and job security. Life in a university town can be intellectually engaging, and have a good variety of eating traditions to choose from. Sports teams to root for, endless supply of young, healthy people rotating in and out, while bringing with them their personal discoveries in music and other areas, and all kinds of music scenes, venues, and styles.

    Our university has an interesting policy for its non-faculty employees. It is possible for one employee to donate his/her sick leave and vacation time to another employee. I've seen people band together to help out a colleague in this way.
     
    drmoniker, Jimmy Owen and Flakey like this.
  10. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,730
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Location:
    The Land of 10,000 Lakes
    Well sometimes. I'm a retired Director of Security 30 years in the field in variety of industries and settings. Spent 8 years as police officer military and civilian. A member of ASIS and a CCP and PSP. My college is one of the most veteran friendly in the U.S. When I started my initial lic./Masters in Ed. I applied for a position as a public safety officer/security. Willing to work overnights in a guard position with the college. I didn't even get a phone call. Go figure.
     
  11. Stefanovich

    Stefanovich Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    963
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2010
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Good for you for going for it. I tried and failed. I worked from 11 pm to 7 am and then had classes from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. I would make dinner, do homework, and go to bed around 7 pm. Lasted about 3 months before I quit my job. This was before I had kids too! I can't imagine even trying now. For me in the work/school/family competition school is always going to come last. Thus, I quit my job and am back at school. Not having a paycheck is unpleasant, but I pick up casual work where I can and get summer jobs too.
     
  12. Milspec

    Milspec Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,457
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2016
    Location:
    Nebraska
    I did it working 3 part-time jobs during the school year and a full-time job during the summers. It took me over 5 years to get it done after needing to take a couple of semesters off to earn more money, but it can be done.

    Having said that, let me offer some different advice. Don't go to college unless it is necessary to go to college. If you are entering a field that requires it (doctor, engineer, lawyer, etc.) then fine. If you are going to college for a business degree or liberal arts degree of some kind, you would be wasting your money. If you are contemplating it simply because you are hearing all the hype about how it will allow you to earn more money...you would be wasting your money and time.

    College is no longer about education. It is a degree factory where they make a ton of money off people by selling them this crap that it is mandatory in life. People take out huge loans under this premise and end up broke for life delivering pizza with a degree.

    I hold 3 Bachelor degrees (don't laugh) in English, Film Studies, and Geology from a State University. I ended up working law enforcement, a water chemist, nuclear radiation worker, and the obits writer for the local paper. None of those things required the degrees.

    Now I operate a cleaning business that makes $150 / hr which required nothing except some equipment investment and hard work. There are tons of jobs out there in the service trades that pay far greater than any of the office jobs that most college kids end up with.

    Sorry for the long-winded reply, but people need to be honest about the benefits of going to college before they waste their money and time. If you need it, yes you can accomplish it paying your way without loans, but you have to want it.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  13. rburd2

    rburd2 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    40
    Posts:
    1,299
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Location:
    Georgia, US
    I read the first few responses and applaud the OP. Now somebody quote this and tell me to get off my ass at almost 37 yrs old. Please. I'm tired of working so hard to me just above the poverty line.
     
  14. beezerboy

    beezerboy Tele-Meister

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    308
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2016
    Location:
    AK
    sorry, I didn't read all the responses, but, no, not advisable... its tough. been there, done that, have stories, etc. I have 3 degrees & a few certs. if you can't take off work and concentrate 100% on the goal it's better to go longer at a lower work load.... even if it adds a couple, 3 years.

    if you go college or even community college you want ACCREDITED course work, with accreditation through one of the major education agencies. if you go through trade school make sure the local union for that trade accepts the training. any other training, the VALUE in the working world is less.... and some of it is worth zero.... be careful.

    I've been in a couple trades, I've been in the academic world as well. I'm almost 67 with almost 50 years work history... I worked a couple trades, but I also taught in trade school and university. these are things I know.
     
    Milspec likes this.
  15. dswo

    dswo Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    737
    Joined:
    May 1, 2016
    Location:
    East Carolina
    I've been teaching college students for 18 years. Some students can make this work, but most would do better to trim expenses and/or take longer. The ones who work full time are often proud of that fact -- and in the abstract, they should be. The problem is that I usually hear this sideways boast as an excuse for bad or late work. I don't assume that my class should take precedence over work or other responsibilities, but if you only have a few quality hours for school, you shouldn't be surprised when someone else who puts in twice as many hours on a paper or project gets a better grade. A course grade is not meant to measure your value as a person, but knowledge or expertise that you can demonstrate in a subject.

    The OP is in a different category from most of my students, being a grown-up with family responsibilities.

    Veterans, in my experience, have realistic expectations and don't make excuses. Same with nursing students.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2017
    Milspec and dlew919 like this.
  16. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,793
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    Why did you earn 3 Bachelor degrees? Among academics, multiple degrees at the same level suggest that the holder is indecisive and cannot advance to the next level of education. How do you feel about this?

    I had a student who earned his PhD in composition, but started over again as an art major undergrad. From the way he talks, it sounds like he is trawling for young girls. I wouldn't casually just toss this out there, as I am sure there is something off about the whole thing, starting with him.
     
    dlew919 likes this.
  17. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,617
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, West Australia
    My nine yards too, 12 years ago. I went to college/Uni for the first time in my life at the age of 38. It was my last ditch to get out of the rut of work I hated. After graduating in the top 10% of my class it still took 8 years to get the career change I was after, and it happened with the company I was already with the whole time. But it wouldn't have happened without the study.

    First - I loved what I was studying. It didn't feel like work, it felt like a hobby. Being a mature student, you get to teach the kids stuff, like doing the work (many don't), an adult perspective on the topics that isn't curriculum, and genuine enthusiasm for learning.

    Second - I got breaks at college. Mature student often do when you talk to the lecturers, they cut you slack and help you out. They know your motivation is sky-high and you'll turn in good work.

    Look, I was 38 when I started and did not have the time for a degree to take 8 years, doing it part time. I'd be too old for employers to take me seriously. So I had to take on a full time study load, part time.

    I got notes and outlines before and after semesters started/finished, so I got a head start on the reading and prep. I didn't have semester study breaks, I worked through and made notes and researched. When semester started, I already knew what we were covering and what assignments I be doing - even had some of them drafted.

    But the other break I had, was working on the road. I could cut work and get to class when I had too, but again, tutors cut me slack - especially when they knew the quality of my work.

    Even so, I still pulled late nights into early morning when I had too. I wanted it bad, but it didn't feel like a chore. Never does when you're doing something you really love. I look back and can see that I was doing it all with no doubt whatsoever that I would blitz the course and finish well. It was what happened after that was out of my control.

    I was proud of what I achieved, and I wondered if they'd ever be a pay off. Thankfully, eventually there was and I'm grateful, and it shows in what I do at work. So if you can find a similar way, it's worth it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2017
    drlucky likes this.
  18. Milspec

    Milspec Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,457
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2016
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Indecisive is correct. I started out pre-law, then switched to journalism, and then decided to just go with what I was closest to in order to get it done. Turned out I was close to several, so I decided to just go with all of them hoping at least one would become valuable in the workplace.

    At some level, they were all valuable, but not as a direct link to any employment. I used to consider returning to academics, but I really do not see the value in it at my age and see it as an over-hyped activity for most fields. A degree (of any level) only proves that the person was willing to put in the time and money to earn it, not that they are better or smarter. That has value, but so does experience and applied skill-sets.
     
  19. CK Dexter Haven

    CK Dexter Haven Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    59
    Posts:
    3,435
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2017
    Location:
    GCDB
    People go to college for many reasons; some need the degree to enter a regulated field either real (education, medicine, law etc) or defacto (academia, high level business etc.) Others are looking for vocational training, that they did not or could not get at the secondary level, and some like myself just want to get the heck outta' Dodge. I worked 40 hours a week at two very interesting part time jobs in the university music department, and went to school full time. Never thought a moment about it (however I did not have family obligations) I have never used my performance degree in my vocation, but I use it every day, in my advocation. College gave me access to experiences and situations that would have not been available in my small town, I was so green that my first attended recital was a "piano trio", I fully expected to see three pianos on stage. Others make different choices, I have a friend who is a excellent musician; honor roll in H.S. would have made an outstanding music educator. He paints houses and makes a good living at it, plays in a bunch of things in our home town, has never mentioned college once, he'd did however once share that "I paint for a living, but I play to live." Like many things to each his own..
     
    drlucky and wayloncash like this.
  20. drlucky

    drlucky Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    826
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Location:
    Fresno, Ca
    Here's my story: started college in the early 80's, was lucky enough to have a part time job where the owner of the store would pay tuition on his employees in college (back then it was about 300 bucks a semester full time at CSU Fresno, and he had figured out a way to use it as a business write-off). However, being a major dumba$$ I spent most of that portion of my college career playing in bands and partying. Quit school in '91 30 units shy of graduating to work full time because I had gotten married and my (ex)wife never met a credit card she didn't like. Fast forward to 2005: I was tired of the job I was in, so I decided to go back and finish my BA. Being an "older (43) returning student" it wasn't hard to get back in, despite my 2.8 GPA from the 80's. Right after I got accepted, my (current) wife became pregnant with our first child. I did three semesters part time at night with a baby in the house, worked full time. Second to last semester took 22 units; 12 units the last while working part time. Had to cash out my 401k, sell my '56 Chevy to do it, but graduated in Spring 2007 with my BA. Funny thing is, I managed straight A's and was on the Dean's List every semester when I went back. I'd say the stability of family life helped.

    So yeah, it's doable. Not sure how old you are, but I found that the professors I had when I went back liked having older students in their class, as we usually were much more serious about learning.

    So, go for it! You can do it.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.