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Is it "locked and loaded" or "nocked and loaded"?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by emu!, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. emu!

    emu! Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't know if all these years I have been hearing this wrong...but I always assumed it was "locked and loaded"...basically because...I didn't know there was such a word as "nocked". But apparently, there is. :confused:

    edit:

    Maybe I should be more clear...

    I knew there was a word as "nocked", as in "nocked up"...but I didn't know it related to guns.
     
  2. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Have you updated getbent's defecation / defection thread yet?
     
  3. solly

    solly TDPRI Member

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    you nock an arrow
     
  4. smallstoner

    smallstoner Tele-Meister

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    Yeah, I'm sure this makes sense to somebody.
     
  5. BelairPlayer

    BelairPlayer Tele-Afflicted

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    "Locked", as in the firing pin is locked in the firing position and "loaded" as in the firing pin is gonna come down on a round in the chamber.
     
  6. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    Nock is an archery term, but I don't know if you could say a bow is "loaded" unless it's a crossbow.
     
  7. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Lock is a firearm term that goes back a long way. The firing mechanism on older firearms( think flintlock or muzzleloading guns) was referred to as the lock.

    Also, after proliferation of the John Browning designed 1911 .45acp, the term "cocked and locked" came into use, referring to the manner the firearm was carried when ready for duty. The hammer is cocked, and one of the safety catches is locked into the slide to prevent the hammer from falling accidentally, firing the weapon.

    Over time, the term locked has taken on several different meanings, but often refers to a weapons hammer which commonly has three positions: resting( fallen), cocked completely back ready to fire, or positioned in between on a safety notch or loading notch( like a peacemaker). Placing the firearm in these positions is commonly referred to as locked back or a variation there of.

    But generally, the term locked, means the firearm is in battery, and ready for action. Meaning the guns mechanism for loading and firing is in position.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  8. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    Knocked up and loaded? :D
     
  9. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Next on Jerry Springer...
     
  10. stnmtthw

    stnmtthw Friend of Leo's

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    I have some cousins like that.
     
  11. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I always assumed it meant the gun was loaded but in a locked position (safety engaged) so when you stormed the situation you were ready, but not going to put a bullet into your mates in front of you until the enemy was engaged.
     
  12. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    "Locked and loaded" is specific to the Colt 1911 .45 ACP pistol. It's a John Browning design. John Browning was the Leo Fender of firearms.

    "Locked and loaded" as it relates to a Colt 1911 means there's one in the chamber, the hammer is cocked and the safety is on. The safety locks the gun so the hammer can't drop. That's how you carry a 1911, locked and loaded.
     
  13. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    My thoughts, too.
     
  14. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    if youre referring to pregnancy...its knocked up not nocked up
     
  15. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Colt nailed the term "lock". I always thought the term "locked" did refer to a gun in battery on safe. The other term relating to lock that is referenced in gun lingo is "lock time", referring to the actual time it takes between sear release and hammer contact with primer.
     
  16. smallstoner

    smallstoner Tele-Meister

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    Nock Nock.

    Who's there.

    Miss.

    Miss who?

    Miss Spelling.
     
  17. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Usually referring to the 1911 .45 Cal Semi Auto Pistol:

    Conditions of readiness:

    Condition 0: round in chamber, hammer cocked, safety Off
    Condition 1: round in chamber, hammer cocked, safety On
    Condition 2: round in chamber, hammer uncocked
    (note: all of the above include a loaded magazine in the weapon)

    Condition 3: empty chamber, hammer uncocked, loaded magazine in weapon
    Condition 4: empty chamber, no magazine in weapon
     
  18. sjtalon

    sjtalon Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    ala Jeff Cooper ▲
     
  19. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    When I hear "lock and load," it's always in reference to an automatic rifle rather than a handgun. The usual internet references make mention of it being first used with the Garand. The "lock" part is the insertion of the magazine (or clip, in the case of the Garand) and the "load" part is the release of the bolt to charge the chamber.
     
  20. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    sjtalon, you are correct of course.
     
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