IS IT JUST ME OR HAS EVERYBODY BEEN HYPNOTISED?

Wound_Up

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I'm in the same situation, but a few months from complete retirement. However, I am going to miss my students. This generation is different from any that I have taught before, but they are not zombies. They are quite passionate about many things, just not the same things I am. I don't ban phones, but they don't use them in class. Some of them do exit the classroom to use them. It is true that a couple of weeks ago when I said, "Well, the world today is quite different from the world we were in last time I saw you," they had no idea what I was talking about. They knew about the war, but they did not understand the consequences. They listened to me outline them, however, and some had questions after class. Every generation in history has argued that the kids are no good, even the ancient Greeks.

Last time I was in school, at the local vocational college, our instructor said nobody could use their phones in class.

Well, except me lol. I had an issue with looking up stuff he said to see if he was right and then I'd correct the teacher if he wasn't LOL. I'd raise my hand and be like "well, it says right here that blah blah blah so & so..." <shrug> lol.

He got used to it eventually. I mean, he knew that he didn't know everything so he was pretty humble when he was wrong about stuff. And I was light years ahead of everybody else in class so I pretty much did what I wanted. It was automotive technology and I already knew it all. I just went so I'd have official training and someone would actually hire me as a service tech. And that's all it took. I had a job before I left school. I was also the oldest student in class @ 30 yrs old. Everybody else was fresh out of high school. So that's also why I was so far ahead of them with knowledge and skills.

That was around 2010. A few years after that, the instructor was arrested for messing with kids.

I was quite shocked.
 
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ZackyDog

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I was at Sushi-land in Tukwila WA a few years ago.

A father and his daughter were having lunch/dinner, and he was pointing out the different types of sushi on the conveyor belt. The daughter was engrossed in her cell phone. :(

1650535082896.png
 

BigDaddyLH

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About three years ago my Wife bought me an expensive cell phone. It's been sitting in my desk drawer with a dead battery since the day she gave it to me. I'd be happy to use it for talking like folks used to do but I can't get anyone to do that. All they want to do is type messages. It seems to me that texting is a poor form of human interaction to say the least. I'm a singer and guitar player and that stuff is like the equivalent of me showing up at a bar to do a show and handing everyone a set list. "Hope you find this entertaining folks I'm going home now". Call me over the hill but if they can't open their mouths and talk to me like a normal person I don't want to know them.

I'm out on another errand and my wife tests me a list of items to pick up at the grocery store. Something may otherwise require a description of what it looks like, so she'll send a photo. There, that wasn't so bad, was it?
 

telemnemonics

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Great photographs.
I really like the Rorschach Test at the top.
If a Shrink showed me that one my answer would have to be that I see Orpheus descending into a sea of hysteria.
Excellent even perfect interpretation!

My musical journey has focused on finding that line where audiences AKA humanity, sees and hears by association.
When they see a car they say CAR, and don’t see camshafts and connecting rods.
Music and all arts tends to require conformity to reach the majority of humans.
Stray too far from conformist standards of music, painting etc, and many humans comment that their five year old could do that.
Hysteria could be the dissociative state the listener experiences when exposed to paintings or music they cannot assign one of their concepts to.

But the artist must provide reassuring cliches to drag an audience or patron closer to that frightening state, or risks losing them and descending alone.
 

telemnemonics

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Stepping back a good ways, human perception really may be a sort of “everyone has been hypnotized” situation, given that humans assign symbolic identities to everything around them/ us, believing that if they/ we went to 16 years of institutional education, we understand the things we see in the world around us.

Understand is false, we only associate things we see with how we experience them but unless we are doctors or engineers we understand very little yet assign symbolic and often false understanding bytes to all that passes through our view.
 

telemnemonics

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No, I meant how the water reflected the land above it, there was nothing actually wrong with the first one except it's just like an optical illusion
Hmmm, I only see the world through my phones eye view and now that you mention it the water is too clear while the land appears to be having some sort of nervous breakdown or maybe an earthquake?
Also the horizon should be dead straight yet appears to wriggle like a serpent?
26179408-5DD0-4201-A86B-175DD5164D61.jpeg
 

telestratosonic

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As my health that left me bed bound for 75%+ of the last 3 years improves, I've been getting out a bit more often. Mainly the odd full English/Scottish breakfast at a cafe in the local village, or venture further and take a drive to one of the Perthshire towns for a coffee, so I haven't seen very many people until now except at the hospital.

Today, I ventured 25 miles into Stirling (small city) to have 6" lopped off my tresses and spent some time having lunch. Later, after a drive, I went to my usual fish and chip shop and sat by the river, in a small public park.

I'm by nature (a weirdo) a solitary animal but enjoy people watching. It feeds my lyric and short story writing. Airports were a good place for it in the past.

What I've noticed, more so recently and today in particular, is the amount of faces glued to their phone screens. Couples out for dinner, not talking, their faces fixed mainly on their left palms, right index finger poking at their phones. The smartest guy in the room appears to go by the name Bob Samsung or Jim Apple.
Queues are the same, I was asked by the shop assistant to nudge the guy in front of me today because it was his turn to be served but he was too busy scrolling his phone. He looked rather peeved about it being his turn.

It's not as if the people I've seen doing this are stuck in some hellhole, the places I go to are surrounded by outstanding natural beauty but none of them seem to look up from their phone screens. The vast majority are day trippers and tourists, which makes it all the weirder. Why travel 50-100miles to stare at a phone, when there's a perfectly good throne in the bathroom for that.

It seems to have accelerated while I've been away from public places and it's not just the younger folks either. Age doesn't seem to be specific in this behaviour.

Did I miss some mass hypnosis event, while I was stuck at home?
If I happen to be in a town/small city early in the morning, I'll sometimes venture into a coffee shop. Instead of buying a newspaper, I'll be on my iPhone 8 Plus. I won't be texting though; I'll be reading the online news from various sources. And the screen of the 8 Plus is big enough to read from.

I may be over your way sometime in the next year or two.

My wife's great-grandfather was from Dundee. He came out to Canada in the early 1880s. He joined the North-West Mounted Police (Reg. # 1075) at Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1885 and served in southwestern Alberta until 1889. The west was still wild and woolly in those days, especially down near the Montana border.

My wife's late mother has been to Dundee and the surrounding area but my wife hasn't. So, we've been thinking about a trip over that way.

So if you see an 70-odd, grey-haired/bearded guy hunched over an iPhone, nursing a strong black coffee, in a Scottish coffee shop, it may be me. I'll be catching up on the news.
 

Ted Keane

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As my health that left me bed bound for 75%+ of the last 3 years improves, I've been getting out a bit more often. Mainly the odd full English/Scottish breakfast at a cafe in the local village, or venture further and take a drive to one of the Perthshire towns for a coffee, so I haven't seen very many people until now except at the hospital.

Today, I ventured 25 miles into Stirling (small city) to have 6" lopped off my tresses and spent some time having lunch. Later, after a drive, I went to my usual fish and chip shop and sat by the river, in a small public park.

I'm by nature (a weirdo) a solitary animal but enjoy people watching. It feeds my lyric and short story writing. Airports were a good place for it in the past.

What I've noticed, more so recently and today in particular, is the amount of faces glued to their phone screens. Couples out for dinner, not talking, their faces fixed mainly on their left palms, right index finger poking at their phones. The smartest guy in the room appears to go by the name Bob Samsung or Jim Apple.
Queues are the same, I was asked by the shop assistant to nudge the guy in front of me today because it was his turn to be served but he was too busy scrolling his phone. He looked rather peeved about it being his turn.

It's not as if the people I've seen doing this are stuck in some hellhole, the places I go to are surrounded by outstanding natural beauty but none of them seem to look up from their phone screens. The vast majority are day trippers and tourists, which makes it all the weirder. Why travel 50-100miles to stare at a phone, when there's a perfectly good throne in the bathroom for that.

It seems to have accelerated while I've been away from public places and it's not just the younger folks either. Age doesn't seem to be specific in this behaviour.

Did I miss some mass hypnosis event, while I was stuck at home?
My 2 dogs hate the phone. When I'm talking on the phone,they attack me to get me to hang up.Not a bad attack,just pulling on my pants,shirt,ect.
 

Kandinskyesque

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My wife's late mother has been to Dundee and the surrounding area but my wife hasn't. So, we've been thinking about a trip over that way.
Dundee has became a great city in recent years, it was in decline in the 80s but has had real positive change over the last decade.
The new V&A museum is worth a visit, it's got a good coffee shop for reading the news on your phone, which I also do sometimes but never in company.
However, if in Dundee, I'd recommend a newspaper in its analogue form, the local Courier in particular. After all Dundee is famous for jute, jam and journalism.
 

telestratosonic

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Dundee has became a great city in recent years, it was in decline in the 80s but has had real positive change over the last decade.
The new V&A museum is worth a visit, it's got a good coffee shop for reading the news on your phone, which I also do sometimes but never in company.
However, if in Dundee, I'd recommend a newspaper in its analogue form, the local Courier in particular. After all Dundee is famous for jute, jam and journalism.
Interesting and thanks. Don't get me wrong; I like reading newspapers and when travelling, I always buy the local newspapers. Local newspapers, imo, give one a 'feel' for the area: upcoming events, festivals, et cetera. if I get over there, I'll be sure to pick up the Courier.

By the way, my wife's great-grandfather's name is/was Henry (Harry) Hope.
 

Kandinskyesque

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My 2 dogs hate the phone. When I'm talking on the phone,they attack me to get me to hang up.Not a bad attack,just pulling on my pants,shirt,ect.
I wonder if there's a plus 20KHz frequency they can hear from your phone and they don't like it.

...Which got me thinking about the possibility of extraneous high frequency noise from our cell phones, wi-fi etc that domestic pets might hear.
They may even be talking among themselves now, talking about the time the human race went mad and started to become rules by small rectangular objects!!!
 

Wrighty

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I've no idea how long ago you were there but I've saw the place improve significantly since I worked there back when I had the day job in the early 1990s. It's recently been polled as one of the best places to live in the UK and its got a big fancy sports centre with a good pool now.
That Indian restaurant is still there.
As for the chippy, the one I go to is in Callander which is en route to my 30(ish) mile home journey to the Trossachs.
A long time ago, pos. 40 years. Right Indian, wrong chippy! SIL lived in Roseberry place, end house next to a tyre fitting place which, when I last visited had been replaced by a new development. From your opening comment I can only think that it went downhill for a time. I thought it was great.
 

Kandinskyesque

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A long time ago, pos. 40 years. Right Indian, wrong chippy! SIL lived in Roseberry place, end house next to a tyre fitting place which, when I last visited had been replaced by a new development. From your opening comment I can only think that it went downhill for a time. I thought it was great.
Never really went downhill it just got better but also much busier, 365 tourism now too and the university has expanded. We nearly moved there a few years ago but opted for the rural life instead.

I know the area where your SIL lived (Riverside) well, I was the area engineer with the water dept when a whole lot of those new developments were happening in the 90s; I can't believe it's 30 years ago now, which also means I'm 30 years married this year and 30 years older.
 

1955

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Excellent even perfect interpretation!

My musical journey has focused on finding that line where audiences AKA humanity, sees and hears by association.
When they see a car they say CAR, and don’t see camshafts and connecting rods.
Music and all arts tends to require conformity to reach the majority of humans.
Stray too far from conformist standards of music, painting etc, and many humans comment that their five year old could do that.
Hysteria could be the dissociative state the listener experiences when exposed to paintings or music they cannot assign one of their concepts to.

But the artist must provide reassuring cliches to drag an audience or patron closer to that frightening state, or risks losing them and descending alone.
2AD1C251-3AC6-466E-80F9-720A69179007.jpeg

The ink blot vs. newcoke, the artist at enmity with the worldly. To communicate, they must concede that the symbology muffles the sharpness of their vision.
 




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