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Is a Yamaha C40 worth fixing?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by paulblackford, Nov 30, 2020.

  1. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Holic

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    I was just given a Yamaha C40, by my cousin, who found it in her basement. She had bought it for one of her kids years ago, but they had no interest. I appreciate the gesture, that she remembered that I'm a guitar player, and gave it to me, but it's missing the nut, saddle, strings, and the button of one tuning peg. To restore it, in both time and money, I'll probably be out over $50 at least. I've also never done a classical nut, or acoustic saddle, so it's a bit of an experiment. Anybody have one? Do they sound usable for recording, or anything? It's the beginners model, so... It reminds me of an article I read in a motorcycle magazine called, "Free Bikes, and Other Nightmares." :)
     
  2. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    Sentimental value is something.

    But your gut is correct, it is worth about what a small classical is worth today, no much.

    But it would be good wall art or an opportunity to work on your luthier skills.
     
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  3. summer_69

    summer_69 Tele-Meister

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    Rationally speaking not worth it. OTOH you might get some entertaintment fixing it. Thats also a value, and if you dont keep it you might give to someone in need of a guitar and think of yourself as a good person for doing that. But isolated seen not worth it.
     
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  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    As I recall the C40 was an inexpensive short scale entry level classical. There are a couple of things that would help my decision whether to work on it or not. First, how is the neck angle? Can you get acceptable action without a neck reset (which might not be possible on this guitar). Second, does it have structural issues? Does it look like it has ever been strung with steel strings (which is pretty much the death for a classical). Lastly, how are the frets?

    Replacing the tunes, saddle and making a nut are straight forward, but the nut requires some special tools and skills - do you want to buy the files and learn the skills? Will it be a good sounding guitar - probably not. I can't tell you more without seeing it, but I have a bad habit of repairing junky guitars and giving them to someone who needs one.
     
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  5. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Holic

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    I think I'm going to leave it as it is. I'm an artist, so I can always use it as a prop in a still-life painting, or something. So, for now, it goes in the closet. I've done several nuts on my own partscasters, but my nut files are specific to the strings I use. I was honestly more worried about the bridge saddle, as it is straight across, and it would be only a thickness of about 2+ mm. I don't know how I would intonate something so thin. I can probably buy something that is already somewhat compensated. Also the tuner buttons seem to be cast-on plastic with no apparent way to just replace the button on one. I can't bring myself to throw it away, though. I've never thrown away a guitar before. It just feels...wrong :)
     
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  6. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    sounds like 10 or 15 dollars and a half-hour of time. Fun, relaxing, and satisfying. Then you can give the guitar to a school or charity in your town.
     
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  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you have nut files it is not hard to make a classical nut - they are more or less flat across the top (unless the f/b is radiused which it might be on an old Yami). Classical strings range from about 25 to 45 thousands - all it takes is a file from your set that is a big wider. Classical saddles are not compensated (the slot is, the individual strings are not) - just round the top of the saddle blank off and it will be fine.

    Classical guitars usually have an action at the first fret actions from 0.025 to 0.030, and 12th fret action of 0.125 on the 1st string to 0.150 on the 6th. The action will seem high to you, thats the way they are. Here is one I just did

    IMG_6604-1.jpg

    Tuner button might be more of a problem - you might have to replace the entire assembly. Classical guitar tuners are pretty much standardized but you should still check the dimensions. Many people like me who work on guitars a lot will have a box full of tuners or you can buy something like the economy version here

    https://www.stewmac.com/parts-and-h...lyra-style-gotoh-classical-guitar-tuners.html
     
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  8. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Holic

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    Strangely, the saddle on this one is not angled at all. It's just straight across - parallel to the nut. That's why I figured I would have to do it by carving the saddle, but it still would not intonate it entirely. I think the tuners are what is killing the thing, for me. I'm not going to dump any real money in this. Thank you for the tips, though.
     
  9. harpdog

    harpdog Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    C40’s are economical but sound surprisingly good. Most need a little set up, but worth the effort.
     
  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    What I meant to say is that classical saddles do not need to be angled nor do they need the little kick that we traditionally do with steel strings - it has to do with the compliance of the string material. However the saddle is set back from the scale position - in other words compensated for string stretch and stiffness. You will sometimes see the third string given a little kink but most of the time it is not necessary.

    IMG_6553.JPG

    Sometimes the fretboard is planed a bit on the bass side so that you don't need to make the bass side of the saddle quite as tall - we can discuss this if you decide you want to go ahead with it.
     
  11. 1 21 gigawatts

    1 21 gigawatts Tele-Meister

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    I'd fix it just for the challenge and satisfaction of saving a lost sole. But I have bought a couple of basket cases that weren't worth fixing, just because I knew that nobody else would.

    I'd probably feel obligated to fix it to not disappoint my cousin.
     
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