Is a Horse Dangerous (for children?)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Tele-beeb, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

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    Short answer, yes....
     
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  2. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

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    The best kind of horses to have...
     
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  3. RollingBender

    RollingBender Tele-Afflicted

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    My wife’s cousin has a boarding stable just a few miles away. She boards about 10 horses. One young couple visits and cares for their own horse a few times a week but most of the owners mail in a check monthly but rarely visit. One owner hasn’t been there on over 2 years. Very sad.

    My daughter has a way with the animals. She will just sit with them, feeding them hands full of hay or treats for hours... not saying a word, just being a part of the heard. They seem to respect her.
    956DAAE9-D32F-443B-9677-D7786D04FA5F.jpeg
     
  4. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Holic

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    Experience: several trips to ER, black and blue areas. Horses are big strong animals with a mind of their own. Proceed with caution. Watch the children at all times.
     
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  5. unixfish

    unixfish Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    My sister had a pony and then a horse growing up.

    I put the saddle on the pony, and took a quick ride to make sure it was tight enough. It wasn't. Three stitches in my head.

    My sister's horse got spooked by a grocery bag that had been there for hours and threw her, breaking her arm. She spend two weeks in traction before they could put a cast on.

    Stuff like this happens / can happen.

    My sister has good memories of 4-H shows in the summer, riding, and her horses. Most probably, someone will get hurt. Between the horse, food, vet bills, and the trailer to transport the horse, it also gets a bit expensive.

    It is a great teaching tool about responsibility, and something most kids will remember fondly. Just know what you are getting in for.
     
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  6. marc2211

    marc2211 Tele-Holic

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    Like most things, it's hard to make generalisations. There are dangerous horses, dangerous riders, and dangerous situations. Part of horse riding is balancing all of these, and even then, the statistics show that it is a dangerous sport - however everything we do has a level of inherant risk.

    My wife has ridden horses from when she was about 7 years old - we have 3 at the house, and 1 in a local stables. My wife is 36 now, and still rides every few days and usually every few months in dressage competitions. She has had some nasty falls, but it is sadly part of the game.

    All my kids (9, 6 and 4) ride every week and are of a good level. I ride about once a month, time permitting, but am purely a hack (I prefer my DH moutnain biking - where I have injured myself much more than horse riding!)

    No one in the family rides without a properly adjusted helmet and body armor.

    Horse riding teaches responsibility and discipline, as well as empathy for other animals and riders - but yes, there is a risk.
     
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  7. Owenmoney

    Owenmoney Tele-Afflicted

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    My wife and I love horses, have owned them for years and are both very competent with them. There is a distinct difference between the horsemen/ women and the average horse person, horse lover. Horsemen /women are students of the animals. We learn about their nature, their personalities, their hierarchy in the herd, their fight or flight nature. Horse lovers, horse people tend to treat them like
    Pets. They are NOT PETS. They can be your best friend, confidant, companion but they are livestock, they live In A barn or open pasture. They need to know you are the alpha in your herd. They need constant care, and handling. If you don’t prove to be their leader, they will take over that role in a heartbeat. They are the most beautiful creature on the planet, designed to be ridden and their ability to consent to that partnership has been totally beneficial to the human experience and progress. They plowed our fields, carried our armies, transported our ancestors and us, they enrich our lives but they need to be treated properly and understood to be appreciated.
    Things can go from zero to rodeo in a nano second and horses feed off the behavior of other horses around them. If one horse spooks, the herd instinct tells the rest of them to spook too.
    In Groups, people tend to be paying attention to other people when first priority is to pay attention to their horse first, other people second.
    It takes constant commitment to become a good horsemen , even naturals spend a lot of time learning from others .


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  8. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    It's like motorcycles or skydiving or firearms... there is fun to be had by responsible individuals and many people participate responsibly and without incident but it is dangerous period and you can get killed/maimed for sure.

    I used to motorcycle a lot.. I've always thought of horses as way more expensive motorcycles that can decide you're going to crash at any point on their own. Motorcycle does what you tell it unless it fails catastrophically. The Horse does what you ask most/some of the time unless it fails (injury) or just decides it doesn't want to do what you want.
     
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  9. maggieo

    maggieo Tele-Holic

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    Old farm girl here- that's the best advice. If the horse and the kids take to each other, you've got something pretty special, even with an old Quarter Horse. Make sure the kids meet the horse before you buy. It's even better if they can ride it before you take it home.
     
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  10. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That is a lovely Fjord. I used to have a couple.

    I train and compete with horses. I do a sport called cutting. Here is a pic of me and one of my 6 horses - his name is Bodhi.

    [​IMG]

    Honestly everything I know about how to be a good human being I have learned through horses. They can teach you an awful lot about life and what kind of person you are.

    But they aren't for everyone. And not every horse is right for every person. I have 6 currently. I would put anyone up on Bodhi, but I also have a horse named Mav that I would never have anyone else ride.

    The expression is: when you interact with a horse you either putting training in or taking training out. If you don't know what you are doing you are probably mostly taking training out. So you need a trainer putting training back in.

    As prey animals they interact and socialize in very different ways than predators. Even thought they are large animals they are very subtle communicators. And they communicate in a very different way than predators. Space and the manipulation of space is very important to horse. They are constantly trying to know where they are in the hierarchy and seeing if they can take your space is one way the do this. So, one of the problems people new to horses can get into is that they are giving really mixed messages to their horse and that tends to escalate the horse.

    Anyway, my point of all this is working with the right horse can be one of the most rewarding experience one can have. Being around the wrong horse - one that isn't suited to you or your knowledge level can be dangerous for all involved.

    I find it fascinating that there are so many folks with horse experience on the forum. Wouldn't have guessed it.
     
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  11. Owenmoney

    Owenmoney Tele-Afflicted

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    Very good answer. I was training for a while and I stopped when I would have the horse going great and within two weeks of the owner taking the horse, it would be untrained. People either aren’t committed enough, are too busy and just don’t care. They think a horse is like a car, you just ride when you want and put it away for weeks or months at a time while just feeding it. Winter puts people in the house and the horse is lucky it gets fed and feet trimmed. At least that’s what happens here. My wife and I rode all the time in all kinds of weather. It was our passion.


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  12. RollingBender

    RollingBender Tele-Afflicted

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    When I was a teenager, we had a mule that would cut with very little with very little direction needed from the rider. She would actually do it for fun if you turned her out with the cattle. Very special animal. She was the go-to mount for inexperienced riders visiting our farm.
     
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  13. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That is cool. If a horse/mule have the gene or the drive they will typically take to cutting pretty well. I had a horse named Stargazer that would beg you to let him go cut cattle if he could see them. You need them to be cowy in order to teach them to cut. On the other hand horses that are real cowy can take more time/work getting them ready for the show pen as they cut well, but they don't always cut in ways that will score points. :)

    My experience is that super cowy horses are usually pretty good all around horses, and make good beginner horses. But my sample size isn't huge.
     
  14. RollingBender

    RollingBender Tele-Afflicted

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    A horse, a length of rope and an inner tube are great fun (can be dangerous...ask Mrs. Bender) in the winter snow. The horse can change direction much faster than a snowmobile which will send the rider of the inner tube for a very fast ride!!!
     
  15. maggieo

    maggieo Tele-Holic

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    Man, Bodhi is one good-looking horse! Great photo, too.

    I reckon that if there was a guitar forum where folks knew about horses, it'd be one devoted to Telecasters! Someone give me a "HOWDY!"
     
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  16. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Thank you. He is a special horse.
     
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  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I will allow, that over my life, my most exciting "adventures" have always been on "pet horse" types of horses. They're simply not trained in the same way, so much of the time. I didn't bucked off; didn't get banged up but I was simply incredibly lucky. I was young and quick to heal in those days. I'd rather have a misadventure as a kid than as an older adult. Probably better not to have these "misadventures" at all -- and instead go with "pro" horses with tons of familiarity with strangers.
     
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  18. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    It's amazing the things we survived... Remember lawn darts lol
     
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  19. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    Would you put your child in a vehicle with dodgy brakes, steering that is random at best and depends upon hauling on two thin leather straps to make it occaisionally work, suspension that can levitate when least expected, one end that bites and the other that kicks, an exhaust that releases extreme noxious gases and solids at random intervals, can move suddenly sideways, backwards or forwards at any sudden noise, has acceleration that depends upon vocalisation (giddyup) and has no direct control by the operator? I have been bucked off, trampled on and kicked so now stick with wheeled vehicles powered by the internal combustion engine.
     
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  20. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    This seems to be the rule, rather than the exception. My girlfriend's sister boards I guess about a dozen and some owners make themselves so scarce. The division seems to be, places where people pay fairly promptly, and places where some people sometimes don't pay at all. What do you do when people don't pay their boarding bills? You can't call the Constable. You still have to feed and brush and exercise and doctor the horses.

    I think your daughter has the right idea. Horses might do things, sometimes, but they're better "people" than humans. That's what I think.
     
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