Is a Horse Dangerous (for children?)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Tele-beeb, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Simple answer yes. I grew up on a small horse ranch. We usually had 10-13 horses. My dad rented them out and gave lessons. Certain horses will bite, kick or try anything to get you off their back. My sis was the horseman, I was the person horses knew they had figured out. My horse "Chief" would run home from two miles away and in the process try every attempt he could to go under a low tree branch and scrape me off. He would take off with no notice, and run home. The bit in his mouth did no good when he did this. Other times he was fine... for a limited time. I either had to hang on or fall off, even on the road.
    Once he did this in the rain, at a sharp corner in the road , he cut into the wet grass. Next thing I knew he was upside down right over me and I banged into a fence. Fortunately he didn't land on me. He got up, ran home and I limped home on foot. There he was.... standing at the hitching post ....waiting for me to unsaddle him.
    There are good horses out there, but I would not leave children unsupervised around them.
     
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  2. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm kinda comfortable with horses, but I have no real desire to ride one... there's horses in two places across the road and in the paddock behind my house and if they get out they do laps around my place.....folks ride by here to get to the forest, etc...

    My granny lived near a race course and when we went to visit we kids often walked past stables in the backstreets and saw grooms walking race horses around... they were HUGE and often flighty as they went by, rearing up and giving handlers a hard time.... I was shiite scared of them and pressed back against the fence as they came closer....

    I also worked a lot with land surveyors and worked around paddocks with horses/cows as we went about our business.. I always called the horses over to the fence for a pat and a hand full of some grass, they seem to like me...

    I guess, kids who grow up on farms/ranches should learn to ride as it might become their work later on...

    magnificent creatures though..:)
     
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  3. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

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    The answer to the OP's question is yes. Of course the age, size, intelligence, temperament, and training, (both the kid and the hoss), all figure in determining how dangerous. The absolute respect for the ability of a horse to kill a person can not be over-emphasized. If they are treated properly, most horses are as safe as most active sports activities.

    I once saw a horse get annoyed at a dog; killed the dog first try, with a casual kick to the head. I'll never forget the sound it made. The brain-weight to body-weight ratio for a horse is less than one-twelfth that of a human, this is a general indicator of cognitive ability, so horses are very instinct-driven.

    Learning the proper way to relate to, and care for, a horse, can lead to a very rewarding relationship and can teach a child many lessons about life.
     
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  4. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Haaa, yup. I was riding a horse along the Mexican border. As soon as we hit the sand at the ocean, my horse decided to roll in the sand with the saddle on whether I was still on or not. I jumped off just in time and stood there waiting for my horse to complete his fun. He finally stopped and patiently waited for me to get back on. All was good after that and actually the horse seemed happier.
     
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  5. Owenmoney

    Owenmoney Tele-Afflicted

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    Same here, bit, kicked, stepped on, fallen on, bucked off, slammed in a stall, and wouldn’t have missed it for a minute. Cowboy up or go bleed in the truck. No helmets, just cowboyboyin. Helmets are for people who are planning on falling off. Watch little britches rodeo, little four year olds, boys and girls ride in like the wind barrel racing, goat tying, etc,no helmets but had proper horse educations from parents who know horses. Meanwhile , city people can get thrown by the fifty cent wallmart pony.


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  6. Torren61

    Torren61 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Yes. I am a lizard.

     
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  7. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    Ahhhh mrrrr. LIZARD!


    Peewee is great in that movie
     
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  8. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

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    Depends on the horse and the kid. If both are well trained and not erratic, then yes. If either are not well trained and erratic, then no. Almost every horse has more than enough strength to kill practically any human. A poorly trained or ill tempered horse is more dangerous than a well tempered, well trained horse. Horses that spook easily are much more dangerous than their calmer counterparts. If the child doesn’t know the basic rules and respect that horses should be shown, that child is in more danger than a child who knows what/what not to do. Same goes for adults.
     
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  9. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    When I was 9 or so the girls who lived next door had horses (and goats and chickens). Of course any boy wants to take a horse ride with the pretty girl next door. The horse didn't see it that way though. Get to know the horse before riding it.
     
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  10. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    "Horses are unpredictable, with that comes risk."

    ^^^THIS^^^

    I've been around horses most of my life. All it takes for some horses is for a bird to fly near their face, or for a greenhorn to do something innocuous like shake a blanket or open an umbrella, and a normally calm horse can go bananas.

    I've seen people get thrown, and I've seen people get stomped. I have had my foot broken once and I've been bitten twice. Never been kicked. Yet.

    So, are they safe for kids? About as safe as a dirtbike, I guess. Which means a helmet is required all the time, because falling off is not an "if," it's a "when."
     
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  11. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Very true. Horseowners here are "Ringers" or Cowboys as you say. Others are committed horse owners and work them daily.I can ride and after a jump the horse landed in a dry creek, splayed it's legs, off I went but one boot got caught in the stirrup and I was dragged a few metres ( about 20 feet). Took a lot of skin off my back. If you buy a horse for a child always have an experienced person supervising them. A horse will even try to drag you along a fence if it is not happy. JMHO
     
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  12. P Bill

    P Bill Tele-Meister

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    Eight of these very friendly little buggers live down the road.

    "A horse is a large unpredictable animal" Mark Twain

    My experience of horses is that they never throw away a chance to go lame, and that in all respects they are well meaning and unreliable animals. I have also observed that if you refuse a high price for a favorite horse, he will go and lay down somewhere and die.
    Mark Twain - San Francisco Bulletin, 12/6/1866

    I know the horse too well. I have known the horse in war and in peace, and there is no place where a horse is comfortable. A horse thinks of too many things to do which you do not expect. He is apt to bite you in the leg when you think he is half asleep. The horse has too many caprices, and he is too much given to initiative. He invents too many new ideas. No, I don't want anything to do with a horse.
    - Mark Twain's Speeches, 11/10/1900
    DSC04193.JPG DSC04253.JPG DSC04371.JPG DSC04374.JPG DSC04377.JPG DSC04245.JPG
     
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  13. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    We boarded "Frankie" for a summer around half a century ago. Frankie was someone's daughter's pet. Frankie was a biter. Frankie would wait for his opportunity and lay on a big ol' horse bite. Love handles were Frankie's favorite chomp zone.

    Our buddy Jimmy was around that day. Jimmy was a blacksmith, a mule skinner and a self styled mountain man.

    https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newsminer/obituary.aspx?pid=174907518

    My brother was taking care of Frankie that day. Jimmy was in the barn with him. Bro let his guard down for a moment. Frankie chomped him good.

    Jimmy immediately jumped into the stall, grabbed Frankie by the ears and bit him on the nose. And growled. Frankie's eyes got wider and wider. Jimmy finally let go when it became clear he might lose a few teeth outta the deal.


    We were at the Blue Hill Fair up in Maine for James McMurtry's set a couple years ago. Got a plate of Thai food and watched some of the horse pull before the show. We were just in time for the three horse hitch. The three horse hitch is dangerous. Most pulling organizations don't do it. Sure enough, one of the horses got spooked. The teamster lost control of his team. The inner horse ended up on its back as the outers stampeded. The out of control team headed straight for the crowd. Fortunately there were a dozen other teamsters there. They all jumped to subdue the stampeding team. There was no blood, no stitches, no broken bones, no hurt people and no harmed horses. Turned out o.k.. It was obvious to everyone it could have gone the other way.
     
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  14. stormsedge

    stormsedge Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    I always thought I'd have a horse...but neigh.
     
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  15. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    One drunken night I stumbled upon a paddock with 5 horses in it in the middle of the city parklands. I was taking a shortcut walking from one bar to another after closing time. I think they were sleeping standing up. I gave one a light slap on the rear and they all took off and scared the hell out of me and the mate that was with me.
     
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  16. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    the neighbours horse, Sunshine was born on their block behind mine, it's always been a bit nuts and hard to handle, good escape artist, etc...

    it's some special breed that was from showjumping/dressage parents, their older horse was the mother... but Sunshine was a few hands too short for the standard of that sport or something?, so it never got the full training required either and as the kids got older and rode less it's just a paddock horse these days... I can't remember seeing anyone ride it for years..

    weird eyes... a barbed wire scar on her shoulder from charging through fences... got a few good wire scars on her flanks, too... it's like having a pesky teenager in the street galloping up and down needing parental intervention... :)


    white horse, sunshine...JPG
     
  17. Marc Morfei

    Marc Morfei Tele-Afflicted

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    Lots of things are dangerous. Getting up off the couch is dangerous. Knowledge and respect for what you’re doing are what keep you safe.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
  18. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Where's your couch?...o_O:D
     
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  19. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

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    I am enjoying all the story’s.
    Thanks for taking the time to reply.
    I am several steps away from horse ownership.
    It seems, from the more first-hand replies, one must be a horse-master rather than a horse owner (if one is to be in close proximity.)
    Thanks again all.
     
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  20. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    Both my kids learned to ride when young and we have friends with horses.

    It’s not without risks, some of them significant and random. Our kids made it unscathed.

    If you have a good stables and trainers/leaders, it can be a great and safe experience for kids. Moving to ownership is expensive and lifestyle changing. Not for us.
     
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