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Innovative Blues?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by PastorJay, Dec 16, 2019.

  1. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Thanks for clarifying. As mentioned earlier in this thread, different blues speak to different people. That is true with all music. If we all liked the same thing it would be pretty boring and no innovation at all. So, Mike, you have made a very valid point. There are certain blues throughout it's history that I personally don't like and I assume almost everyone here would say the same thing. I am to the point that blues is the only genre I listen to and play guitar to anymore, with the exception of my wife injecting other stuff on the iPod or her electric bass.:rolleyes: That probably makes me somewhat narrow minded and even perhaps why I don't "get" Miles Davis.
     
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  2. Ripradiant

    Ripradiant Tele-Afflicted

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    I think there are a lot of great artists reinventing, reinterpreting and developing the blues.
     
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  3. T-Bone

    T-Bone Tele-Afflicted

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    This is it.

    All good blues is innovative. It’s like painting an artwork in which you’re given a fixed-size blank canvas and 6 tubes of paint. The raw materials you start with are limited, but there a no limits to what you can paint.

    Blues is like a haiku. You get 17 syllables and a theme. But there’s no limit to what a haiku poet can say in just 17 syllables.

    Every blues tune is a structure that you choose to stay within, and it’s up to you to create something new and exciting inside that structure.

    if you’re trying to sound just like [insert famous musician name] then you’re missing the point.
     
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  4. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Innovative blues is an oxymoron.

    My brother despises the blues so much he calls
    it slow death march ballads.

    But I digress. I posted earlier about the 14 types of blues
    out now. Perhaps always room for more.
     
  5. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I'm suspicious when people claim their definition is the one true one.
     
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  6. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    Well said T-Bone
     
  7. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    Oops, hit the wrong replay.
    Well said T-Bone
     
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  8. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is a funny subject to me from a personal standpoint. I was once an actual judge in a blues playoff contest, and was congratulated on being the tiebreaking vote in the contest on my excellent taste in blues players for voting for the guy who won. The ONLY kind of music I have any real interest in in Okie music, I just thought the guy I voted for had great tone, and was an accomplished player.
     
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  9. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    The Blues is a narrative form. Blues-Rock is the sub-genre, beloved of the British Invasion fans and legions of subsequent guitar players. No surprise, on this great Guitar Forum, that the recommendations in this thread have been almost all variations on the six-string theme.

    I have seen hundreds of Blues acts, over the years. Most are the brainchild of a guitarist, who often has no interest in research, beyond the louder recorded works of Eric Clapton, Peter Green or Stevie Ray Vaughan. Singing- a Story- is often way down the list of priorities. When you see or hear a band who are painting a complete picture in your mind, you must treasure them. If you can't get your fill of them- or they move to another continent- you'll need to start your own band, to get that fix of West Coast Swing, Piedmont, Mississippi Hill Country- or one of the other regional flavours, which are neglected by guitar soloists and guitar solo fans.

    I formed a band, a few years ago, with a 70 year-old bassist, with a voice like sandpaper and a mere 50 years of live performance to draw on. He loves to sing Wolf, Hooker and Sonny Boy (2) tunes, I like to do Muddy, Elmore, Otis Rush, Willie McTell, Lowell Fulson, Magic Sam, RL Burnside, PeeWee Crayton, Jimmy Reed, T-Bone, Freddy, Hound Dog- and so on. The good news is- there is an audience for this music- and they like to dance. :cool:

    Innovation? How about.....saying all you want to, in sixteen bars of a solo? Or just with a newly invented riff? Or totally rearranging great tunes from the 30s or 40s? Playing Mud's songs, in the style of Wolf or Burnside? Sneaking your own lyrics into a classic 50s Chicago groove? It's not that difficult to do. The teenagers in the crowd- who are ogling your tatty amp and wondering why your guitar sound is so odd and fretboard fingering unfathomable- don't know what's original and what's a downright liberty. Either it's good music or it ain't.

    The early Black Keys records, the White Stripes stuff, Ian Siegal, the Dickinson brothers, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Larkin Poe, Corey Harris, Jontavious Willis, Keb Mo', Otis Taylor, Cedric Burnside.....Lots of Blues to appeal to a new audience, if you look around. Plenty of unknown bands, who don't want to thrill you with their speedy pentatonics, too- but you'll need to dig a bit deeper.;)
     
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  10. Pooks

    Pooks TDPRI Member

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    I may have missed it if someone mentioned him, but I've been digging Josh Smith. Certainly has deep knowledge of the form and its history, but beings in a bunch of Bebop and Jazz. Plus he's a MONSTER tele player to boot.
     
  11. MattyK-USA

    MattyK-USA Tele-Afflicted

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    Mate, reading this post? The one I know for sure is that I'd love to come hear your band play. I ain't dancing, but I'm definitely gonna be diggin' it.
     
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  12. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    Sit in, maybe? We bring up guests, all the time.

    :cool::)

    Last time out, we had one of my good friends, who never dances, hopping from foot to foot, during a Jimmy Reed tune. I pointed this out, to the rest of the audience, at the end of the song and he got a round of applause. :D:lol:
     
  13. MattyK-USA

    MattyK-USA Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm in. And if you give me a location and date, you might be surprised. :)
     
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  14. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

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    Wow, lotsa guys here who never studied music but everyone has an opinion....

    Damn.



    The Blues started as a very innovative form of music. Early Blues, by name, was full of harmonic embellishment. Go listen to the earliest stuff on record like Bessie Smith and many instrumental pianists on and on. All sorts of substitutions, interesting turnarounds, and lines that we would refer to today as "Jazzy." Lots of the early mainstream performers were well versed in conservatory training, especially the New Orleans scene.

    The lone-man Delta-esque ****? Really innovative, highly so. Almost like Sufi or some Indian music where what you lacked in formal harmonic rambling it makes up for in it's massive rhythmic bags. From the crazy syncopations of the thumb pickers like Gary Davis to the bad ass trance-type stuff done by early John Lee Hooker and oh so much more. The same could be said in studying it's subtle tuning shifts as in 1/4 step sharp minor 3rds being a true interval in the music.

    Oh man, then you get to the early electric guitar players all who, while attempting to copy, really developed strong individual senses of time, approach and physical technique. Another lovely rabbit hole you can go down in those 50's singles from record companies out of Memphis, Chicago and even Nashville. So much cool stuff.

    Then improvisational stadium Blues was just the ****. So many guys turning their playing into extended compositional form. The apex of these folks being Jimi Hendrix who had everything rhythmically you'd find in the Delta stuff but took it to a new level doing Red House from 100's of different approaches over his live career.



    Then, at the point Jazz became more about "sounding smart" Blues became about "PHAT tone GIANT VIBRATO" type stuff. More of a guitar-off competition whidlewhee thing quoting the classics with some shred in between.


    Now? Well, all the folks who have a loud whistle blowing between their ears will lecture you on the uselessness of having to pay attention to anything that doesn't follow a 3 minute same **** over and over again format. The anti-attention span brigade will smash you with their enlightened view of music. Thus, how do you learn to play not only with innovation but emotion in a live context when no one wants to pay attention to anything that's not a personal immediate climax for them? Sure, you can sit in the bedroom and make the Blues more & more complex all day long but doing it a way that's not useless chromatic wankery requires the performer to get a reaction out of those looking for emotional input.


    It's a hard knock world and even harder for the blues to innovate when no one wants to pay attention to anything deeper than Joe Bonamassa.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
  15. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    [​IMG]
     
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