Infamous Relatives? You had one

Hey_you

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I tried to find info on Mr Beltran. Hadn't come across any yet. I did find a better copy of the Wanted Poster tho-

Beltran.jpg
 

Stubee

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Not all are infamous, some simply tangentially…

My cousin was the man who wrote the letter to Susan Smith breaking up with her and indicating he didn’t want a relationship involving kids. I’m sure he regretted adding the bit about children.

A cousin of my wife caused the Mall of Americas to lock down while police searched for him and a girl. I’m not sure if they caught him then but he was nabbed soon enough.

Another of my cousins was not infamous but was the victim of one such. She was the 3rd known victim of the East Lansing/MSU Strangler in the late 1970s. My sister was one of the last to see her alive and she kept up a correspondence with a law enforcement lead to help ensure that the killer—who was given a plea deal in exchange for leading authorities to victims remains—is never paroled. I saw what such crimes can do to the victim’s immediate families, my Aunt & Uncle and remaining cousin.

A bank robbery attempt occurred in our town in 1937. Both fleeing robbers were shot by a dentist using his deer rifle from a second floor window, one fatally from 150 yards. The second robber was convicted and became the only person ever legally executed in Michigan in 1938. My town then became seemingly off limits to bank robbers, so imagine the attention my older brother received when he absconded with a large amount of cash from a bank 60-odd years later?

He was quickly apprehended as he left a long string of evidence—security cameras, a rental car in his own name, told friends he’d do it etc—and the authorities knew him on sight. My elderly Dad was on a cruise and he was happily surprised when I was at the airport that night for his late arrival with my stepmom. I told him the latest news when he sat down to wait for their luggage, and as he said, “Well, that’s a first for the Stubee family”!
 

Fiesta Red

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My dad’s family was pretty rough…bootleggers, con men, gamblers, swindlers, hussies and thieves…supposedly a couple of killers in there, too…so much so that he didn’t tell me anything about them until a few years ago.
 
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boris bubbanov

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Not to mention the probability in America of having ancestors who owned slaves.
I think I've got forebears who owned slaves.

But most USA folks didn't. Why? They were too poor to be able to afford them, or they lived in a locality where folks tended not to own slaves or finally, because they're of more recent immigrant stock and they just got to America too late to be able to accomplish this. If you are of Italian lineage or Greek or Polish or Armenian, you simply can't be guilty because you were not in the right place at the right time.
 

boris bubbanov

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My English last name evolved out of a French name from the last 11th century. When William the Conqueror conquered England, he decreed that everyone have a surname. One of his men took on the French name of his hometown. Over the years, it evolved into an English name and dropped the preposition.

So, I am descended from one of William the Conqueror's henchmen. The family settled in Scotland and it was there that the name gradually became English.
Sounds like my paternal line. Except the existing family surname was changed to the point many would not recognize it. But, didn't most the Henchmen get a large grant, either in Scotland or Ireland? That's where some of my Irish line goes, not to being Celtic.
 

Chester P Squier

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Sounds like my paternal line. Except the existing family surname was changed to the point many would not recognize it. But, didn't most the Henchmen get a large grant, either in Scotland or Ireland? That's where some of my Irish line goes, not to being Celtic.
I didn't know about the grants in Scotland and Ireland, but I am not surprised. My last name only has the first two letters of the French name it evolved out of.
 

dukewellington

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Well… not exactly notorious. But in the early 20th century, my great grandmother, an Irish Republican, was arrested for attacking a police wagon with a mob of other likeminded ladies, and one priest. The newspaper clipping said they flipped over the wagon and then stripped the police officers of their clothing, shouting unruly sentiments in coarse language. Later, she was imprisoned for teaching Irish in school. Way to go, granny! Her brother was a well known horse thief. True tale!
 

Ben Harmless

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My grandparents took up genealogy as self-therapy after they lost my aunt. They found a distant ancestor from the who in the 18th century lost her husband and then opened up a bar at the corner of Wall St. and Broadway in NYC. The authorities apparently ran her out of town for serving alcohol to the American Indians. She just left the area, moved upstate, and opened another bar, doing exactly the same thing.
 

Timbresmith1

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Given some of my few extended family members that I know well, and others who are
long since estranged and not discussed, it's hard to imagine that
there's not somebody infamous on the family tree. I haven't set out on any
genealogical research, it's just a feeling. In my small hometown, many shared our name
but were generally warned to stay away from one another. This is the way it was as
long as I can remember.
That you, Hatfield?
 

GGardner

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Not on my side. But there's at least one knucklehead on my wife's side of the family who was involved in a headline grabbing felony back in the day. Thankfully, it was pre-internet.
 

offsideref

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Aside from the guy I discussed in a different thread, the great uncle who mixed gasoline and milk during prohibition and had to have part of his stomach surgically removed, no.
Crikey. My dad told me about poor people in Glasgow in the 1930s who would attach a rubber hose to a gas light (not while it was lit), bubble it through a bottle of milk, and drink the resulting mixture. Town gas was coal gas then. Drinking it wasn’t a good idea, eh.
 

offsideref

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My ancestors were a pretty law-abiding lot, as far as I know. Once, on the Welsh side of the family, two brothers were entrusted with taking a flock of sheep to market in London. Not sure what year it was, but you had to walk all the way there with the sheep, and walk back with the money. They decided to stay in London. Funnily enough, however many years later, granddad worked as a porter in Smithfield, London’s big meat market, until WW1 came along. I guess it was good news for me, or mum and dad might not have (eventually) met.

I did wonder if the brothers had announced that they were going to the Big City, and the family said, we can’t give you any cash to tide you over until you find work, but you could take these sheep and sell them. But, mum visited the ancestral Welsh valley a few years back, and found that the family had been a bit hacked off about the whole thing.

Not terribly outlawish, I know, they wouldn’t even have appeared on a Wanted poster.
: )

My mum once punched the Duke of Argyll, but you would, wouldn’t you.
 

TheCheapGuitarist

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Crikey. My dad told me about poor people in Glasgow in the 1930s who would attach a rubber hose to a gas light (not while it was lit), bubble it through a bottle of milk, and drink the resulting mixture. Town gas was coal gas then. Drinking it wasn’t a good idea, eh.
Dang .... I thought I'd heard of everything.
 




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