1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

I'm getting more claustrophobic !!!

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Big_Bend, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    48,855
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    Here in the states there's not much chance of that. If you get shot in the head, they cut you open and take all your guts out and put 'em in plastic bags after determining the cause of death, then sew you back up. If you are alive after all that stuff going on, you're one tough son of a gun. :D
     
  2. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    49
    Posts:
    901
    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Location:
    Fayetteville, NC
    I'm airborne qualified and on jump status but really struggle with climbing ladders. This makes even less sense when you consider that every landing is about equivalent to a two story fall.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  3. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    54,538
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA + in the
    I hear that!

    I think my fear of heights was triggered by 2 things, or one or the other of them;

    In Ohio my Dad borrowed some spikes from a Phone Company buddy and went up this huge white oak tree after one of his model airplanes got stuck up there. I didn't like that at all - he was up easily 100 feet;

    And in Tyngsboro, NH he worked on that Lowell Observatory thing and was always scampering around up there in the structure of the thing, over my head.

    Had I not been there, no big deal. But being say 10 years old and seeing your Dad so high above you, doing something that looked so risky, changed the way I saw climbing trees and towers and cliffs and so on. I'd been so relaxed when I was doing it (not that high) myself, even fallen a number of times without a bad result. I just felt helpless - if it had been the neighbor man up so high, I don't think I would've sweated at all.
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    56,708
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    What if you're merely trampled in a Black Friday stampede?
     
  5. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    17,827
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Western Connecticut
    Hey, we all watch CSI and the like down here. No foolin' us. They'd do an autopsy to make sure you weren't really killed by poison smeared onto the heel of someone's shoe, or a coordinated attack where a lady with a little dog on a leash trips you (sorry Toto), and the guy with the steel-toed clodhoppers grinds you to mush.

    One of them CSIs I remember, the coroner makes the first cut for the Y incision, and the dude starts bleeding.

    "Hey, that's not right..."

    Oh man, snapping your head down, that would freak me out, too. I think it was an MRI when I first realized I had a problem. They asked if I wanted the mirror thingie (which helps a little, but only a little). I said "wha...? Nah, I'm good."

    I wasn't exactly crying like a baby when they fished me out...

    Makes me wonder if all this apparent insult to injury (to illness) is a planned distraction from the other horrible thing going on.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  6. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    22,416
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    Oh yeah - all of this.

    If I'm zoning out way up high on a ladder I'm fine - the work is in front of me.

    I had a friend step on the bottom rung one time and yell up "Here - I'll hold the ladder !":eek:

    If there had been something non-lethal to throw down, I would have.

    Fortunately for him, everything I had up there would have killed him...
     
  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    54,538
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA + in the
    Yeah, but one of the things we had to try to explain to the younger kayakers was.......

    Dying was a possibility but not a very likely one, unless you did something unspeakably stupid in the boat like paddle into a large downed tree or underwater sieve or something.

    The bigger issue was, 25 years later all the beatings and the broken bones and bruises and damaged joints from all the close calls would mean, that getting out of bed every morning would be a painful ordeal. And those would be the good days. I'm sure the guys who raced motocross or did downhill racing on skis or mountain bikes could attest to some of this.

    You only have to be 1/20th as banged up as Evel Knievel was to have a very painful second half to your life that seemed to go on forever. If your buddy had died back then, he'd have missed out on much of the "fun". :oops:

    You can't get 19 year olds to think in those terms, though. That's why so many of the combat soldiers are quite young men. God Bless them, the way they think they're immortal. The way they don't flinch when you talk about injury.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  8. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,301
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    You're not alone there. I used to do a fair bit of caving when I was a kid, narrow spaces, far underground. Even thinking about it these days is enough to give me the horrors. Clearly not as extreme as some of the lads here, but it is clearly a change and I don't know why.
     
  9. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    48,855
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    Unless you've been seen by a physician in a certain number of hours before you die, or are in a hospital, as I understand it, everyone gets an autopsy in California. When my mother passed I insisted there be no autopsy, and since she died in the hospital they relented. Had I not opposed it, they would have gone ahead with one. Laws could be different now. My son died during hospice and also avoided an autopsy.
     
  10. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    48,855
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    I once climbed a tree above the old road to Isabella to jump a cat out. When I got up there, a bobcat we had treed kept inching a little further out on a tree limb, and I kept inching out after him. A couple of guys who were with me were standing on the old road looking up from down below. It was a pretty well lit night as the moon was full and no cloud cover.

    I realized as I looked down at them, that I was actually on a limb hanging out over the road, and it must have been a hundred feet straight down. I inched myself right back to the main body of the tree and got down out of it. In the mean time the cat passed me somehow in the deal and ended up back on the ground long before I got there (thankfully), and the dogs were after him again. I quit climbing trees a long, long time ago, but it can make you awfully nervous.
     
  11. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,351
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    R.I.P. 2019
    I don't like unenclosed heights; balconies, open second story overhangs like in hotels, upper decks at sports stadiums, roofs with no railings, tall ladders... All man made objects. But I don't mind cliffs, or looking off a mountain or something like that. I'm OK climbing trees.
     
  12. ricardo1912

    ricardo1912 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,067
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I find as I got older I got worse with heights. At uni holiday jobs on building sites I was happy on scaffolding or loading tiles onto roofs. I won't even go up a ladder to get the autumn leaves out of the gutter now.
    Maybe, as someone has said, all these things become more of a worry as we get older and realise that we're not indestructible and stuff hurts.
     
  13. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,740
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Location:
    The Land of 10,000 Lakes
    WOW Yes. It happened this weekend I was flying to Chicago from Minneapolis. Everything is fine. I sit in a inside seat next to the window and I get hit with a panic attack right out of nowhere. So i get out and go to the back and the flight attendants let me stand until everyone is done boarding. Fortunately the lady on the outside seat is willing to switch and it no problem for me on the flight.

    I like flying. I've flown on UH1s with my feet dangling over the side. I've piloted private planes so flying wasn't the issue. Its being cramped up against the bulkhead in a seat that won't let me stretch out and being blocked in away from the aisle by two other people. It doesn't happen every time in fact I'd even say less than seldom but this time...wow it was the worse I ever had. Elevators I'm fine as long as they keep moving but any delay of the door opening and I feel my heart rate start to increase.
     
  14. JRock1971

    JRock1971 NEW MEMBER!

    Age:
    49
    Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2021
    Location:
    Airdrie, Alberta, Canada
    I am 50 years old now and I am 100 times more claustrophobic than I once was. I believe there is a simple reason for this:

    1) Not enough practice: When you're younger you do more physical activities and play in tight spaces often. the more you do it the more use to it you get

    2) Not in shape: The older you get the bigger, less flexible, less cardio shape you're in. Places feel tighter and smaller when you're fat and tall and out of shape

    3) Your smarter: you have a much better understanding of your mortality, young people throw caution to the wind and haven't experienced as many family deaths or emergency situations

    4) Older people have more stresses: Their job, children, home, spouses. Stress causes anxiety and worry. Being in a closed space amplifies that feeling ten fold.

    I just became a volunteer firefighter and had to undergo a stress test. The test comprised of gear up in thick firefighter outfit, SCBA mask (40 pound of equipment) tightened to your face with a balaclava underneath and helmet. The mask was blacked out so I couldn't see. I had to crawl around for 15 minutes in a maze of enclosed spaces with 2x4 pieces of wood blocking the tunnels that you had to climb under and over. I got stuck man many times in awkward positions. I honestly felt like ripping my mask off a few times as I was sweating, had a hard time breathing and couldn't see anything. Part way through the maze they put a mattress on top of me with a couple people on top of it. I prayed to God to help get me through it. I'm happy to report I made and did extremely well.

    Long story short I believe as you get older you develop more fears. It is important to overcome your fears because the reality is that those fears are unsubstantiated. It is not normal to be fearful of dying in an MRI Tube, being in a washroom, airplane, or a tight space that doesn't pose any actual danger (or little danger). That said, cave diving, being locked in a coffin alive, being trapped in a coal mine, etc. are real dangerous situations and It would be normal to be highly uncomfortable in those situations.

    Life is strange isn't it.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  15. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    7,270
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    London
    For me it’s acrophobia.

    I was doing ok, then I went on several hikes alone summer before last, and each involved me getting stuck on a mountainside alone. I made it back down (obviously), but now my fear of heights is far worse. I have trouble walking across the same bridges I used to walk across every day in London. My legs just freeze up on me now and I feel like I’m gonna fall over.

    I don’t think I’ll be able to stay above the third floor in a hotel anymore.

    The worst was Valentine’s Day last year. My wife wanted me to take her to eat at the top of The Shard, the tallest building in Europe. The walls are glass. They gave me a seat at the window, and the building is like a tall, slender pyramid. So you see the outside wall all the way down to the ground, as if you’re hanging over the edge.

    Not a happy moment, until my wife saw I was getting ready to pass out and had us move to a table farthest away from the window with my back to it. I never took my eyes off my plate for the next two hours.

    Maybe it’s best not to confront your own worst fears.
     
    Digital Larry likes this.
  16. Blister

    Blister Tele-Meister

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    308
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2020
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    He'll yeah
     
  17. Dog Bite

    Dog Bite Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    284
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2018
    Location:
    Montana
    Could be an age thing, the older we get the closer to that tight little box they're gonna put us in and cover it with dirt.
     
  18. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    42,082
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    I can't get through "Dont Fence Me In" without tears streaming and my voice cracking.

    Room. We all just need a little more room. The problem is so many people get more room and they fill it up!

    We go for drives often and hikes and long walks... it helps. The thought of ever being in a crowded stadium again... I dunno, we'll have to see.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.