I'm a "corrected" lefty, and honestly a little bitter about it

Rufus

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I can relate. I am a total lefty. Baseball, tennis, basketball. Except guitar. In 1963, not many lefty guitars around.
My future brother-in-law was a bonafide righty, and was kind enough to teach me on his guitar. Fretting was
tedious at first, but I finally got it. The only thing, AND I DO MEAN, ONLY THING, I do right handed is play
the guitar. It's strange what you can do, once you get use to, now is it?
The fallacy in that logic is that just because it worked for you or some famous celebrity, it will work for ALL lefthanders.
 

JIMMY JAZZMAN

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Brooks Robinson of the Baltimore Orioles (HOF), did everything in life, left-handed except
baseball. I'm sure there are others, but he comes to mind. Oh, and how about them Orioles?
Homer rant, sorry.
 

LGOberean

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I know there are a lot of natural left-handers out there who were forced into right-handedness when they were kids, it was a normal thing to do back in the day (I was born in '63).

I'm still 100% left-footed and do some things left-handed, without realizing it. My wife pointed out to me that I actually taught our daughter to tie her shoes left-handed, and I didn't even know that was a thing.

When I was in the US Army, I had to use a "lefty adapter" on my M16 to prevent the hot brass hitting me in my face. It was a big advantage when we had to collect our brass and mine was always in a neat little pile.

My parents bought me my first guitar when I was 13 or 14. I plunked around on it for a couple of months, picking up songs from my records - probably the Bay City Rollers and early Beatles, lol.

I thought I was doing pretty well like that, and after my parents saw that I was "serious" about learning to play it, they sprung for guitar lessons. The teacher was a retired jazz player who lived in the neighborhood and I guess was just teaching for some pocket change. He was boring and I disliked him immediately.

But he also did something that I'll never forget, or forgive. On our first meeting, he pointed out that I was holding the guitar "upside down". I had been playing a righty guitar left handed, without knowing it! It felt perfectly normal to me and I thought I was actually pretty good at it, at least I felt happy with my own playing.

Instead of telling my parents that I needed a lefty guitar, he just flipped it over and showed me how to hold it "correctly". And of course I just believed him that this was "correct". And then guitar playing became really difficult for me.

I only stuck it out with his lessons for maybe two months. And my parents weren't about to pay for another teacher after I quit on this one. So, I learned virtually nothing from him, but I've struggled ever since then to get that effortless feeling to playing that I had on my upside down Sears acoustic guitar.

Can anyone else relate to this?

Another southpaw here. I can relate to some of what you're saying. I'm a decade older than you, and there were early attempts to change my "handedness." However, what memories I have of that are vague, and I neither relish them nor remember them with rancor.

The only one that immediately comes to mind is my Dad teaching me to offer my right hand for handshakes. He wasn't harsh or mean-spirited about it, but I remember being embarrassed at the time when he corrected me in front of others. But I'm glad now that he did. In retrospect, I know that the nature of my offering my "wrong" hand would have been a constant problem whether Dad had confronted it or not. I believe now that even had I been "left" to my own devices, I would have eventually adapted on my own. Dad just helped me get there sooner.

So I learned to adapt on a lot of things. I do some things to this day right-handed. And I wasn't in the Army, but I too relate to being hit in the face with hot brass when firing semi-auto handguns or rifles. To this day, I still prefer revolvers. BTW, I'm left eye dominant/left-handed.

I learned early on that it's a right-handed world. I could rant and rave now and shake my fist at clouds, but the fact remains, it's a right-handed world. 90% of the world is right-handed. Manufacturing and marketing is geared towards that fact, and rightfully so. It's unfortunate for the southpaw that doesn't do whatever righty, but that's not a manufacturer's or retailer's fault. Retailers couldn't make a good living stocking disproportionate numbers of items that most of the world can't use.

But as for guitar playing, I don't relate. My Dad played guitar, and was right-handed. I have no recollection of or experience with a home without guitars. But as a boy, all I ever saw was standard guitars. I plunked around on one of Dad's guitars at 10 years of age, but didn't get serious about playing until I was 14.

Dad was traveling quite a bit at the time, so I had been learning chords and trying to pick out songs for a couple of months before he knew it. When he realized I was interested, the first thing he did was to assume that I would want to play left-handed. So he restrung one of his guitars for me (a mid-60s/then new Harmony Archtone H1213). But I had been playing guitar the way I saw Dad and others do it. It felt "wrong" to me when I tired it after Dad restrung it. So he put it back standard, and I learned that way.

Neither restringing the guitar nor flipping it upside down even occurred to me. I had never seen anyone play lefty, so that wasn't even a thought in my mind. (Well, I had seen Paul McCartney playing that violin bass left handed, but somehow didn't associate that with playing a 6-string guitar.) Honestly, when I decided to get serious about it, I guess I was just unconsciously applying the life lesson learned about it being a right-handed world, and was just focused on needing to use both hands to play.

Of course, I'm very glad about the way it turned out. I've never had issues finding guitars or playing the guitars of others.
 

Festofish

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Joe Perry is a lefty that plays right. To me it makes sense to put your dominant hand on the neck but alas…I ain’t about to switch now.
 

PaddyPaul

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I'm a lefty and, to be honest, it's a challenge. To the righties I would ask:

Would your guitar-shop experience (buying or browsing) be reduced if from, say, over 1000 instruments you could only test maybe five? Would you be frustrated if that instrument was usually a basic cheapie or an entry-level "quality" model? That apple-red or goldtop or burgundy mist or pewter finish you craved? Sorry sir - black, white or sunburst only. That you may have to pay a subsidy? That reading your favourite guitar magazine reviews is a wonderful experience - if you like sad endings.

Ok, a bit exaggerated, a bit of a whinge. But you get where I'm coming from. If offered right-handednes I'd grab it. I probably still couldn't afford the beauties I covet - but at least the dream is dreamable.

PS: My current line-up is a black Fender US Standard Tele (2012), sunburst Fender CIJ (1998), Fender sunburst US Strat De Luxe (circa 2010) and a rarely used black Epi LP (2009).
 

trev333

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I was watching a local cooking show which has a host and two guests who cook up their fav meal/dessert/other...

One guest was a concert violinist from Finland who grew up in Japan, then went back to Europe to follow her violin career... now playing in our national orchestra..

While she was cooking is was obvious she was a lefty.....most of the prep was done with her left hand and when holding a bowl, her right grip looked awkward...

I assume she plays violin righty, rather well..;)
 

BatUtilityBelt

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I think everyone should play however feels best to them. This is coming from a lefty who didn't play decently until 40-something because before that, I tried to play righty and it just would never take. Lefty guitars held lefty and strung lefty is the only configuration that works for me, but go with whatever works for you.
 

thesamhill

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plucks and strums

Pshaw! Electric players :)

Really though, I'm decent at fingerpicking fairly fast and there are times when my right hand seems like it's going a lot faster than I realized.

That is not something I'm likely to say about my slowpoke left hand, lol


How much rhythm do you have in your non dominant hand?

I was kind of agreeing with this, like it's much easier to imagine fretting with my right than strumming with my left. Almost impossible to imagine strumming with left, actually. Weird

But then again, I can play drums with my left and right hands and I feel like they both do ok. And I can switch left and right on the hat fairly easily.

So actually now I'm now sure. Is this non dominant rhythm thing something you observed or is there like, science on it? Honestly not taking sideways potshots or anything, I'm genuinely curious because I can't tell the answer
 

dougbgt6

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There are no left-handed violins, violas, cellos, contrabasses
I wish people would check their facts before spouting their prejudices.
einstien.PNG
chaplin.PNG lhdviolin.PNG lhd2.PNG

Doug
 

loopfinding

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I wish people would check their facts before spouting their prejudices.
View attachment 1022687 View attachment 1022688 View attachment 1022689 View attachment 1022690

Doug

The top two were amateurs, the next is kids, and the last is a woman who had an accident and had to learn the other way. There may be some self-taught fiddlers playing lefty, but virtually no one who studies an orchestral instrument seriously or plays one professionally plays lefty...because it doesn't really matter which way you learn it.

Handedness may be a legitimate grievance in other areas (like scissors), but I mean, all you have to do is learn an ambidextrous instrument to see that it doesn't really make anything less awkward as far as playing an instrument. If you look at the harp, some cultures favored right hand playing the higher strings, and some the left...most people are right handed, regardless of culture or era, and it doesn’t seem to make any difference in that world. Instrument positioning is just an arbitrary convention.

If you step out of the rock world, it becomes pretty apparent that guitar players are way more fussy compared to other instrumentalists. Lefty guitars are just one of a thousand things they’re fussy about.
 
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blue metalflake

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The education system “corrected” me to be right handed, and I became quite ambidextrous.
As far as musical instruments were concerned I learnt everything the right way round so it’s no big deal. Try looking for a left handed saxophone!
 

Tonetele

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Mark Knopfler is a leftly a r/h guitar as his first.
Now let's be positive. MK is a lefty but chooses to play with his dominant hand ( left) as he seems to belive gives it better playing with the more dominant hand. Maybe all us right handed hould be following suit. I have played for 55 years and regard hin as the best ever, as good as Chet.I fell in love with his style in the late 70s and threw away my picks. Only just using them again in the last year.
 

dougbgt6

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The top two were amateurs, the next is kids, and the last is a woman who had an accident and had to learn the other way. There may be some self-taught fiddlers playing lefty, but virtually no one who studies an orchestral instrument seriously or plays one professionally plays lefty...because it doesn't really matter which way you learn it.
Oh, amateurs, kids and people who've had accidents don't count?

Your original claim was "there are no lefthanded violins" You are incorrect, there are. I've seen them at the Albert Hall during the London Proms season in what you would call "professional orchestras"

I thought this unpleasant urge to make people do it right handed was stamped out 50 years ago, but apparently not.

Doug
 

ChicknPickn

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I know there are a lot of natural left-handers out there who were forced into right-handedness when they were kids, it was a normal thing to do back in the day (I was born in '63).

I'm still 100% left-footed and do some things left-handed, without realizing it. My wife pointed out to me that I actually taught our daughter to tie her shoes left-handed, and I didn't even know that was a thing.

When I was in the US Army, I had to use a "lefty adapter" on my M16 to prevent the hot brass hitting me in my face. It was a big advantage when we had to collect our brass and mine was always in a neat little pile.

My parents bought me my first guitar when I was 13 or 14. I plunked around on it for a couple of months, picking up songs from my records - probably the Bay City Rollers and early Beatles, lol.

I thought I was doing pretty well like that, and after my parents saw that I was "serious" about learning to play it, they sprung for guitar lessons. The teacher was a retired jazz player who lived in the neighborhood and I guess was just teaching for some pocket change. He was boring and I disliked him immediately.

But he also did something that I'll never forget, or forgive. On our first meeting, he pointed out that I was holding the guitar "upside down". I had been playing a righty guitar left handed, without knowing it! It felt perfectly normal to me and I thought I was actually pretty good at it, at least I felt happy with my own playing.

Instead of telling my parents that I needed a lefty guitar, he just flipped it over and showed me how to hold it "correctly". And of course I just believed him that this was "correct". And then guitar playing became really difficult for me.

I only stuck it out with his lessons for maybe two months. And my parents weren't about to pay for another teacher after I quit on this one. So, I learned virtually nothing from him, but I've struggled ever since then to get that effortless feeling to playing that I had on my upside down Sears acoustic guitar.

Can anyone else relate to this?
Yep. Had a weird thing going on when I was learning to write. The teachers saw that I was left-handed, and allowed it, but were perplexed that I wrote letters and entire words backwards, even my name. I'm not ambidextrous exactly, but I perform most fine motor-skill activities left-handed. Stronger arm is the right, and I throw and kick on that side. But play a regular right-handed guitar. Other odd thing is that I can write cursive backwards from right to left with relative ease. Turn the paper over, hold it up to the light, and it reads as normal script.
 

loopfinding

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Oh, amateurs, kids and people who've had accidents don't count?

Your original claim was "there are no lefthanded violins" You are incorrect, there are. I've seen them at the Albert Hall during the London Proms season in what you would call "professional orchestras"

I thought this unpleasant urge to make people do it right handed was stamped out 50 years ago, but apparently not.

Doug

it isn't standardized practice, and it just creates complications (certain things with instruction or construction not being able to be standardized, people getting poked with bows for no reason, etc., etc.) cause it's arbitrary (look at the harp example).

there are right-hand and left-hand drive cars, and righties and lefties drive them with equal proficiency in their native systems. lefties learn right-hand drive slightly faster than righties (their dominant hand is on the wheel and dominant leg on the clutch for manual) and righties learn left-hand drive slightly faster than lefties...but it all equals out and makes no difference in the long run.

i'm willing to bet that if history had it that righties play with the neck to the right of them, then lefties would probably be making some argument about how it's a hindrance they can't use their dominant hand on the neck for increased dexterity. don’t even mean to single out lefties, that’s just how people are.

point being, many things are a legitimate slight against lefties, but some things are just arbitrary (this being one of them). it's just a standardization thing.
 
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effzee

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Yep. Had a weird thing going on when I was learning to write. The teachers saw that I was left-handed, and allowed it, but were perplexed that I wrote letters and entire words backwards, even my name. I'm not ambidextrous exactly, but I perform most fine motor-skill activities left-handed. Stronger arm is the right, and I throw and kick on that side. But play a regular right-handed guitar. Other odd thing is that I can write cursive backwards from right to left with relative ease. Turn the paper over, hold it up to the light, and it reads as normal script.
Mind. Blown. That's amazing stuff you wrote there 🤯
 

ce24

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Both my parents are right handed... My two older brothers and I are lefty's....I was born in 1950. Fortunately we were not changed... My dad was an all American athlete in college and he understood the advantages of being left handed in sports. I play guitar right handed lol. I throw left, bat right, golf right putt left... Go figure.
 

kplamann

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Yep. Had a weird thing going on when I was learning to write. The teachers saw that I was left-handed, and allowed it, but were perplexed that I wrote letters and entire words backwards, even my name. I'm not ambidextrous exactly, but I perform most fine motor-skill activities left-handed. Stronger arm is the right, and I throw and kick on that side. But play a regular right-handed guitar. Other odd thing is that I can write cursive backwards from right to left with relative ease. Turn the paper over, hold it up to the light, and it reads as normal script.
Leonardo da Vinci wrote like that.


leonardo-writing.jpg
 




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