I'm a "corrected" lefty, and honestly a little bitter about it

Rufus

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I mean, the elephant in the room is that it’s only guitarists who feel the need to unnecessarily complicate their lives (drums are trivial to set up lefty). And we often see a lot of posts about neck comfort and other stuff from people who honestly haven’t been playing long enough or at a high enough level to know what they need (i.e. blame the gear for their technique). Often times the solutions are really basic things - you’re not holding the guitar high enough, your wrist is too bent, your picking hand isn’t making the correct motion, etc.

But it’s a free country, I can’t really talk complicating my own life with say, Linux, haha. I just wouldn’t start someone out lefty or recommend they do.
Standard canned reply: If what you said about your dominant hand being better at fretting is true, you would be playing lefthanded…but you’re not.

You don’t strum a violin, piano, saxophone , etc.

How much rhythm do you have in your non dominant hand?
 

loopfinding

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Standard canned reply: If what you said about your dominant hand being better at fretting is true, you would be playing lefthanded…but you’re not.

You don’t strum a violin, piano, saxophone , etc.

How much rhythm do you have in your non dominant hand?

If right handed guitars weren’t the standard, and left handed ones were equally ubiquitous, then maybe I would play lefty.

You don’t strum a piano or a saxophone, but the wrist motion of picking is not horribly different from bowing. I played contrabass for years, it was really quick and easy to pick bowing up coming from picking.

As far as rhythm in my non-dominant hand? I play some drums. The left hand often having to be locked on to 2 and 4 might even force you to be more accurate. It can totally be learned, it isn’t some innate thing. I’ve tried open hand, but I learned crossing over and right hand on the main snare duty is just too awkward for me.
 
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twochiptele

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I am a lefty, my parents never bothered me with that, and I picked up the guitar as a lefty. Guitar teacher thought it was neat ( "as if I'm teaching myself in the mirror!"), so no probs there, actually...I never had any problem with my handedness. It happens to be that I'm in a band with a fellow lefty. Or, so I thought. My fellow lefty is actually a righty playing left handed guitars! I was like "why??" but he found it more comfortable to hold it that way when he started.

To the OP: Maybe your story generated a "what if?" but well.. you are here now with your righthanded guitar... I tried righthanded guitar for a while last year for the experience and I just gave up. Seemed like a nice fun challenge but too much hassle 😄.

Which leads me to the question: anyone here that can play just as good righthanded as lefthanded?
 
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trev333

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Sometimes you just have to flip your guitar and get on with it...:)

My childhood friend, the first kid I knew with a guitar, lost a bit of his arm in a bizarre grain auger accident in his mid 20's....

He just got on with it, flipped his guitar without changing strings around..... I jammed with him often, it was hard to figure out what he was playing by watching his chords... we played by ear mostly....

I did make him a lefty tele to get the controls out from his armpit....;)

he could pick a mean lead with his stump rig pick holder, too


(pics 10 yrs apart)...

Kev lefty.JPG
kev1.jpg
 

Southpaw Tele

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Lefty that plays lefty here. My mom is left handed and my dad was left handed but converted by his parents. I didn’t start playing guitar until my mid-20’s so I could choose and I went with left handed guitars. It felt more natural to me and it’s kept me from over spending on guitars (not as many available). I’ve also learned to put my own together from parts. No regrets playing lefty but would like more options, at times.
 

Lonn

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My Mother was a lefty born in '34 and they tried to convert her, never took. I'm not sure I'd call myself ambidextrous but I do many things lefty like eat, shoot a weapon (rifle and handgun), kick a ball, hit a baseball lefty but catch and throw righty. Carrying heavy things is far easier in my left hand. Someone who AMAZES me is Rafael Nadal. He can genuinely claim to be the greatest male tennis player of all time if he wanted to. He plays lefty but learned to do so in order to be a more difficult opponent. He looks totally unnatural doing so (to me) but you can't argue with the results he's amassed.
 

Southpaw Tele

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Standard canned reply: If what you said about your dominant hand being better at fretting is true, you would be playing lefthanded…but you’re not.

You don’t strum a violin, piano, saxophone , etc.

How much rhythm do you have in your non dominant hand?
THIS ^
 

oregomike

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I know there are a lot of natural left-handers out there who were forced into right-handedness when they were kids, it was a normal thing to do back in the day (I was born in '63).

I'm still 100% left-footed and do some things left-handed, without realizing it. My wife pointed out to me that I actually taught our daughter to tie her shoes left-handed, and I didn't even know that was a thing.

When I was in the US Army, I had to use a "lefty adapter" on my M16 to prevent the hot brass hitting me in my face. It was a big advantage when we had to collect our brass and mine was always in a neat little pile.

My parents bought me my first guitar when I was 13 or 14. I plunked around on it for a couple of months, picking up songs from my records - probably the Bay City Rollers and early Beatles, lol.

I thought I was doing pretty well like that, and after my parents saw that I was "serious" about learning to play it, they sprung for guitar lessons. The teacher was a retired jazz player who lived in the neighborhood and I guess was just teaching for some pocket change. He was boring and I disliked him immediately.

But he also did something that I'll never forget, or forgive. On our first meeting, he pointed out that I was holding the guitar "upside down". I had been playing a righty guitar left handed, without knowing it! It felt perfectly normal to me and I thought I was actually pretty good at it, at least I felt happy with my own playing.

Instead of telling my parents that I needed a lefty guitar, he just flipped it over and showed me how to hold it "correctly". And of course I just believed him that this was "correct". And then guitar playing became really difficult for me.

I only stuck it out with his lessons for maybe two months. And my parents weren't about to pay for another teacher after I quit on this one. So, I learned virtually nothing from him, but I've struggled ever since then to get that effortless feeling to playing that I had on my upside down Sears acoustic guitar.

Can anyone else relate to this?
I can't relate, but my grandma told me (more than once) that her teachers would hit her hand with a ruler if they caught her writing with her left hand, because it was considered an ailment.
 

trev333

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I think it was from the quill and ink days...

starting your script on the left of the page going to the right. your right hand/sleeve didn't drag on the wet ink you just put down...

the way our L-R system of writing is done favoured right handed writing...
 

rave

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I write, throw, kick and play racquet sports lefty. The only sports thing I did was bat righty. I play guitar right handed and thought it was a huge advantage, thinking my more dexterous hand was doing the hard work until one day my teacher told me my picking needed a ton of work.
 

KilroyWasHere

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I know there are a lot of natural left-handers out there who were forced into right-handedness when they were kids, it was a normal thing to do back in the day (I was born in '63).

I'm still 100% left-footed and do some things left-handed, without realizing it. My wife pointed out to me that I actually taught our daughter to tie her shoes left-handed, and I didn't even know that was a thing.

When I was in the US Army, I had to use a "lefty adapter" on my M16 to prevent the hot brass hitting me in my face. It was a big advantage when we had to collect our brass and mine was always in a neat little pile.

My parents bought me my first guitar when I was 13 or 14. I plunked around on it for a couple of months, picking up songs from my records - probably the Bay City Rollers and early Beatles, lol.

I thought I was doing pretty well like that, and after my parents saw that I was "serious" about learning to play it, they sprung for guitar lessons. The teacher was a retired jazz player who lived in the neighborhood and I guess was just teaching for some pocket change. He was boring and I disliked him immediately.

But he also did something that I'll never forget, or forgive. On our first meeting, he pointed out that I was holding the guitar "upside down". I had been playing a righty guitar left handed, without knowing it! It felt perfectly normal to me and I thought I was actually pretty good at it, at least I felt happy with my own playing.

Instead of telling my parents that I needed a lefty guitar, he just flipped it over and showed me how to hold it "correctly". And of course I just believed him that this was "correct". And then guitar playing became really difficult for me.

I only stuck it out with his lessons for maybe two months. And my parents weren't about to pay for another teacher after I quit on this one. So, I learned virtually nothing from him, but I've struggled ever since then to get that effortless feeling to playing that I had on my upside down Sears acoustic guitar.

Can anyone else relate to this?
 

JIMMY JAZZMAN

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I can relate. I am a total lefty. Baseball, tennis, basketball. Except guitar. In 1963, not many lefty guitars around.
My future brother-in-law was a bonafide righty, and was kind enough to teach me on his guitar. Fretting was
tedious at first, but I finally got it. The only thing, AND I DO MEAN, ONLY THING, I do right handed is play
the guitar. It's strange what you can do, once you get use to, now is it?
 

KilroyWasHere

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I know there are a lot of natural left-handers out there who were forced into right-handedness when they were kids, it was a normal thing to do back in the day (I was born in '63).

I'm still 100% left-footed and do some things left-handed, without realizing it. My wife pointed out to me that I actually taught our daughter to tie her shoes left-handed, and I didn't even know that was a thing.

When I was in the US Army, I had to use a "lefty adapter" on my M16 to prevent the hot brass hitting me in my face. It was a big advantage when we had to collect our brass and mine was always in a neat little pile.

My parents bought me my first guitar when I was 13 or 14. I plunked around on it for a couple of months, picking up songs from my records - probably the Bay City Rollers and early Beatles, lol.

I thought I was doing pretty well like that, and after my parents saw that I was "serious" about learning to play it, they sprung for guitar lessons. The teacher was a retired jazz player who lived in the neighborhood and I guess was just teaching for some pocket change. He was boring and I disliked him immediately.

But he also did something that I'll never forget, or forgive. On our first meeting, he pointed out that I was holding the guitar "upside down". I had been playing a righty guitar left handed, without knowing it! It felt perfectly normal to me and I thought I was actually pretty good at it, at least I felt happy with my own playing.

Instead of telling my parents that I needed a lefty guitar, he just flipped it over and showed me how to hold it "correctly". And of course I just believed him that this was "correct". And then guitar playing became really difficult for me.

I only stuck it out with his lessons for maybe two months. And my parents weren't about to pay for another teacher after I quit on this one. So, I learned virtually nothing from him, but I've struggled ever since then to get that effortless feeling to playing that I had on my upside down Sears acoustic guitar.

Can anyone else relate to this?
I struggled for decades to learn to play guitar for a similar reason. They attempted to force me into playing righty, it was beyond a disaster, and eventually I said no thanks, so they caved and said alright, but you need to get an actual left-handed guitar and learn to play that way. I listened, and struggled on and off for decades until one day, my best friend gives me a uke for my birthday. I’m trying to decide if I restring it to be lefty, or just learn to play “upside down” since it’s only four strings. I give it a go “upside down” and VIOLA!, suddenly everything makes complete sense. Not only does it feel correct, suddenly I no longer struggled to read tabs, chord charts made complete sense, everything just came together. I now primarily play right-handed guitars “upside down”. I reconfigured my lefties to play my way. It pissed me off that one of the very few times I listened to the so-called experts (who usually have ZERO experience with lefties), it cost me decades of playing time. Everything is relative, and with guitars, there is no upside down. When I read some of the comments on this site, it triggered the crap out of me, so much so that I registered to comment. The arrogance of the right-handers who start everyone out playing the same right-handed way, regardless, I hope karma comes and beotch slaps the heck out of you and all your descendants for ninety-nine generations to come. You’re getting off easy if that’s all you get. <SMDH>
 

KilroyWasHere

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It probably was normal. You were only playing for a few months like that, so it’s hard to say all these years later how well you were playing anyway. I started as a kid and I didn’t really play with basic competence until almost like two years in. Guitar is awkward and hard for everyone.
You’re projecting YOUR experience onto THEM. MY experience was very akin to effzee’s, and it SUCKED. Only decades later by accident did I come to be playing the way that works best for me, I play what they refer to as a right-handed guitar, left-handed. To H E double toothpicks with those who forced the wrong way upon us (wrong for US) and wasted precious years of learning opportunity, and to those who just don’t understand, try listening.
 




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