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If you replace a body, is it the same guitar?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by LouM, May 25, 2013.

  1. Jack FFR1846

    Jack FFR1846 Tele-Afflicted

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    You put it on eBay and describe it as a 100% original 54 tele that the renouned 60 year Fender employee Abagail Warmouth Ybarra inspected.

    (go ahead and tell me that you would be surprised to see something like that)
     
  2. tschommer

    tschommer Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, and the brownies were delicious.
     
  3. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    im gonna take the side of yes... it is the same guitar. its like a person with a liver transplant or something. same person, new parts. i think guitars have a little soul inside them... or at the very least a mojo... that is more than just the sum of its parts. what makes that guitar that guitar varies... maybe its the neck, or the body... or that goofy pickup combo. who knows? i did a body swap on my first guitar... an early gold label squier... and it still very much feels like my first guitar... and i still love it like my first guitar. pretty much the only thing true to the original is the neck... but i wouldnt hesitate to swap that out and call it my baby...
     
  4. Lostinthe50s

    Lostinthe50s Tele-Afflicted

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    Sorry Kelnet, you chose a bad example. As long as the hull is rebuilt to the same specs, still the same boat. Happens all the time in wooden boat restoration. Many Chris Crafts, Monks, Gars etc that have been rebuilt from rotten or burned hulks. As long as the original tag is still there it is still the same boat.
     
  5. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is my favorite bit in this whole thread.
     
  6. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm not talking about a rebuild. I'm talking about everything on hull A being moved to hull B. Hull A continues to exist, and Hull B is not a restoration or a rebuild, just a different hull but perhaps made of better wood. Hull A, in fact, eventually gets all new parts of its own. Which boat is still the same boat?

    Let's consider THAT. The hardware and neck from one guitar gets moved to a new body. The old body gets all new hardware and a new neck. Which guitar is still the same guitar?
     
  7. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The serial number on fiberglass boats is molded into the hull, so legally the hull is that boat no matter what you do to the rest of it. Since I'm assuming we're talking Fender-style guitars here, the serial number is likely not going to be on the body, so we can go round and round on this one and never have a clear answer.
     
  8. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The clear answer is that if I change the neck, body, neck plate, neck screws, pickguard, PG screws, pick-ups, pots, knobs, switches, control plate, tuners, nut, frets, saddles, saddle adjustment screws, springs, strap pins and ferrules, but keep the bridge plate, I have the same CIJ tele.
     
  9. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    True. Plus, it's a goofy question, because why would someone go to all the trouble of removing everything from the body of a guitar simply to put it on an identical body? And if the new body is not identical, then it's a new guitar.

    "Hey, I replaced the old black body with this new white body."
    "Nice new guitar."
    "No, it's not a new guitar. It's the same guitar."
    "Um, dude, you're old one was black. This one is white. It's a new guitar."
    "No, it's the same guitar."
    "Oh, then you mean you repainted the old one."
    "No. It's a new body, but it's the same guitar, even though it looks different."
    "Dude, did you not wear a gas mask when you painted it, 'cause the fumes have messed you up."
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2013
  10. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

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    ......
     
  11. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The absurdity comes from assuming that it must be either a different guitar or the same guitar.
     
  12. claudel

    claudel Tele-Afflicted

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    Wait.

    Let's ask Herman :lol:
     
  13. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Joey has the right idea.

     
  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Exactly.

    Unless the previous body had sustained some ugly cosmetic damage, and the body was a pristine dead match replacement.

    Reminds me of the car repairs/restorations we used to see: The extent of the replacement of parts was so extensive, it wasn't really the same car. But the original car had high value options ( Hemi, paint codes, etc. ) and was the 2 door hardtop or convertible version and you wanted the serial number off that one, not the beige sedan.
     
  15. dbickford

    dbickford Tele-Afflicted

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    Far out maaan. I mean its changed...like how can it be the same.

    Dig it
     
  16. Axtklinge

    Axtklinge Tele-Meister

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    I really find it hard to believe there's more then one side arguing over this matter...

    Each slab of wood used to built a guitar body is different from the next one. Period.
    Even when they are from the same cut, they will most likely have different density, weight, etc., therefore the tone and sustain of that body will turn out to be different.
    No way around it.
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, but the body, if done somewhat right, is going to reproduce the same result or virtually the same in literally tens of thousands of electric guitar bodies. The differences are subtle even when they can be distinguished. A lot of bodies are essentially interchangeable. The difference is too small to effect the sound and even the feel of the guitar except for those counting angels on the heads of a pin. IMO of course.

    This is the paradox, that we perceive the ID of the guitar staying with the body when it should stay with the neck and pickups. Necks really can vary a great deal in sound even when identical on paper, and the pickups really are where the rubber meets the road.
     
  18. Lostinthe50s

    Lostinthe50s Tele-Afflicted

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    If you believe such things.
     
  19. LarsOS

    LarsOS Tele-Holic

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    Technically ... Yes.

    Think about it.

    :twisted:
     
  20. Flemtone

    Flemtone Tele-Meister

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    I bought my Tele new in '78, the pickups have been replaced a couple of times.
    Sometime in the early 90's I messed the neck up, and wound up getting a buddy's '69 neck in trade for some work. That's what is now on the guitar. It feels just like the original.
    I still think of it as the same guitar, although I guess I know it's not.

    When people ask me what year my Tele is, I tell 'em it's a 78 body with a 69 neck, averaging out to a '74.
     
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