If the Milkyways stars were grains of sand….

4pickupguy

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There are an estimated 400,000,000,000 stars in the Milkyway.

There are approximately 2,534,400 grains of sand in a gallon.

An average residential swimming pool is 25,000 gallons.

It would take a little over six swimming pools to hold a Milkyway worth of sand/stars. (157828.28 gallons)



The Milkyway is a disk with a diameter of 100,000 light years and a thickness of 1000 light years. This is approximately the ratio of a compact disc (remember those?)



The average distance between stars (as grains of sand) is 6 miles……. Representing an average of 4 light years between stars…….. Let that sink in.



Now, imagine even as grains of sand, how big an object our galaxie is……



That’s 1500 miles thick and 150,000 miles in diameter. IN GRAINS OF SAND!!!!

Andromeda has a TRILLION stars!!!


Discuss.

6EC78B67-DB87-4CB9-B089-FA9BD0CF084B.jpeg
 

Toto'sDad

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There are an estimated 400,000,000,000 stars in the Milkyway.

There are approximately 2,534,400 grains of sand in a gallon.

An average residential swimming pool is 25,000 gallons.

It would take a little over six swimming pools to hold a Milkyway worth of sand/stars. (157828.28 gallons)



The Milkyway is a disk with a diameter of 100,000 light years and a thickness of 1000 light years. This is approximately the ratio of a compact disc (remember those?)



The average distance between stars (as grains of sand) is 6 miles……. Representing an average of 4 light years between stars…….. Let that sink in.



Now, imagine even as grains of sand, how big an object our galaxie is……



That’s 1500 miles thick and 150,000 miles in diameter. IN GRAINS OF SAND!!!!

Andromeda has a TRILLION stars!!!


Discuss.

View attachment 987146
So, do we have a plethora of stars Guapo?
 

dogmeat

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and the sum distance approaches infinity in an asymptotic line, do the math
 

Texicaster

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Oh yea……so…..try this on for size!

If the Earth were a grain of sand, then how big would the rest of the universe be in comparison?
Let’s make earth be a largish grain of sand, about 1.27 mm in diameter. This gives us a scale of 10^10 or ten billion to one. Fairly easy to make calculations this way.
All in this scale:
  1. Distance to the moon: 40 mm, about 1.6 inches
  2. Distance to the sun (1 AU): 15 meters or about 50 feet.
  3. Distance to Jupiter: 78 m.
  4. Distance to Pluto: 600 m.
  5. One light year (9.5 trillion km): 950 km. BTW, this means light moves at 0.03 m/s.
  6. Distance to nearest star (4.22 LY): 4000 km.
  7. Distance to galactic center (26,000 LY): 25 million km.
  8. Distance to Andromeda galaxy (2.54 million LY): 2.4 billion km (but at this scale, still within our real-world solar system).
  9. Distance to the center of our Virgo supercluster (about 65 million LY): 60 billion km (deep in the Oort Cloud, in the real universe). There are probably 10 million superclusters in the observable universe, so we are still a big step away from the size!
  10. Distance to the edge of the observable universe (94 billion LY): 90 trillion km, almost 10 LY in the real universe.
So scaling the earth to a grain of sand, Pluto is a 10 minute walk, local stars are a plane flight away, our local group of galaxies fits in the solar system, but the edge of the universe is way past the nearest star! A freaking big place!
 

boneyguy

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And that's just stars...not counting all the planets surrounding those suns and the moons and various other celestial objects of each of those solar systems. AND that's just our Milky Way galaxy!! And there is likely to be somewhere in the realm of 200 billion galaxies in the universe (best guess at this point)!! That's a lot of stuff out there!!
 

3fngrs

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A good time for a quote from the Hitchikers guide to the galaxy.
“Space,” it says, “is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly hugely mindboggingly big it is. I mean you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist, but that’s just peanuts to space."
I'm going to have to read those books again before I die. Haven't read them since the'80s.
 

Wrighty

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There are an estimated 400,000,000,000 stars in the Milkyway.

There are approximately 2,534,400 grains of sand in a gallon.

An average residential swimming pool is 25,000 gallons.

It would take a little over six swimming pools to hold a Milkyway worth of sand/stars. (157828.28 gallons)



The Milkyway is a disk with a diameter of 100,000 light years and a thickness of 1000 light years. This is approximately the ratio of a compact disc (remember those?)



The average distance between stars (as grains of sand) is 6 miles……. Representing an average of 4 light years between stars…….. Let that sink in.



Now, imagine even as grains of sand, how big an object our galaxie is……



That’s 1500 miles thick and 150,000 miles in diameter. IN GRAINS OF SAND!!!!

Andromeda has a TRILLION stars!!!


Discuss.

View attachment 987146
My boggler just cut in big time!
 

Wrighty

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Oh yea……so…..try this on for size!

If the Earth were a grain of sand, then how big would the rest of the universe be in comparison?
Let’s make earth be a largish grain of sand, about 1.27 mm in diameter. This gives us a scale of 10^10 or ten billion to one. Fairly easy to make calculations this way.
All in this scale:
  1. Distance to the moon: 40 mm, about 1.6 inches
  2. Distance to the sun (1 AU): 15 meters or about 50 feet.
  3. Distance to Jupiter: 78 m.
  4. Distance to Pluto: 600 m.
  5. One light year (9.5 trillion km): 950 km. BTW, this means light moves at 0.03 m/s.
  6. Distance to nearest star (4.22 LY): 4000 km.
  7. Distance to galactic center (26,000 LY): 25 million km.
  8. Distance to Andromeda galaxy (2.54 million LY): 2.4 billion km (but at this scale, still within our real-world solar system).
  9. Distance to the center of our Virgo supercluster (about 65 million LY): 60 billion km (deep in the Oort Cloud, in the real universe). There are probably 10 million superclusters in the observable universe, so we are still a big step away from the size!
  10. Distance to the edge of the observable universe (94 billion LY): 90 trillion km, almost 10 LY in the real universe.
So scaling the earth to a grain of sand, Pluto is a 10 minute walk, local stars are a plane flight away, our local group of galaxies fits in the solar system, but the edge of the universe is way past the nearest star! A freaking big place!
So, what’s at the end of space? Two theories I’ve heard are it doesn’t end, ever and it’s curved in on itself so that you would eventually finish where you started. Also, if, in the ‘it doesn’t end hypothesis, presumably the outer reaches are filled with nothing, zilch, nowt, a true vacuum. If we send electromagnetic waves through it, is it still a perfect vacuum, or has it then got something in it?
 

Wrighty

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And that's just stars...not counting all the planets surrounding those suns and the moons and various other celestial objects of each of those solar systems. AND that's just our Milky Way galaxy!! And there is likely to be somewhere in the realm of 200 billion galaxies in the universe (best guess at this point)!! That's a lot of stuff out there!!
And it all weighs a lot more than it should. Dark matter is heavy. Therefore, a LP is made up of dark matter. I’m going for a lie down now……….
 




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