Ideas on fixing a stripped screw hole on a hollow body

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by jwp333, May 28, 2017.

  1. jwp333

    jwp333 Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    I've got an Aria guitar similar to an es-175. Closest to the neck, the mount screw goes direct into the maple laminated body. A humbucker screw was holding it. After some recent work where I took the pickguard off, the screw wouldn't hold. Should I just get a bigger screw? Current screw was a #3, but the #4 screw like a strat pickup screw that I tried is too big. Maybe something like a #3 wood screw? Can I use glue in some way to fill in the hole?
     
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  2. Spacemanspiff500

    Spacemanspiff500 TDPRI Member

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    Take a round toothpick with some wood glue on it, shove it in the screw hole. Bust it of and trim it off. The old screw should hold in that same hole just fine
     
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  3. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    Break off the end of a toothpick/match stick and glue it into the hole.
     
  4. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In other words, fill the hole with some wood and glue. Use end nippers to cutnthe toothpick flush. Then, drill an appropriate relief hole for that #3 screw.
     
  5. perttime

    perttime Friend of Leo's

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    Might not even need glue with the toothpick or match. Insert the tiny piece of wood, screw in the screw.
     
  6. Old Tele man

    Old Tele man Friend of Leo's

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    Feed an old/used treble guitar string thru a 1/2-inch x 1/2-inch x 1/8-inch piece of hard wood backing "plate" until the retainer is solidly against the back of the wood. Now, "fish" the pointed end of the string thru the closest "ƒ-hole" inside the body and UP thru the screw-hole you need to repair. Before pulling the wood "plate" thru the ƒ-hole, apply GOOD wood-glue to the surface that will be contacting the under/inside of the body...then...CAREFULLY feed the plate with glue thru the ƒ-hole while simultaneously pulling the guitar-string end UP thru the screw-hole. The idea is to hold the hard wood plate tight against the inside of the body centered on the existing screw-hole. Once the glue sets, carefully feed the metal guitar string back down thru the screw-hole and hard wood plate into the body cavity and retrieve with a magnet. Be SURE the hole in the hard wood plate is smaller than the existing screw-hole in the body; the goal is for the plate to become the "nut" for the attaching screw to screw into rather than the guitar body.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
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  7. JD0x0

    JD0x0 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm partial to JB weld. Fill the hole with it, lube the screw (I use silicon lubricant usually) and then carefully spin the screw into the epoxy. Sometimes it helps to wait until the epoxy is starting to set, so it's a bit less goopy. If you do it correctly you end up with epoxy threads holding the screw, rather than wood/glue.

    I've done this to a bolt on neck that had the holes in the neck stripped out at the factory, because they used a high powered screw gun to insert the screws, I'm assuming. Seems to have no issue bonding to the wood
     
  8. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    Easiest solution is to just wet the sides of the hole with super glue. Do this a few times, allowing each coat to dry. Let the 3rd coat dry overnight, apply a little wax to screw threads and done. No need to stick wood in the hole, drilling not necessary.

    Works perfect every time. This also works for neck holes.
     
  9. Darkness

    Darkness Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes. Yes. Yes. I learned this trick from Dan Erlywines book. It fixed a stripped neck screw. When the glue was dry, the screw bit into the wood better than it did when it was just wood. It's been years now and the screw has held as if it was in cement. I've removed the neck a few times for work, and that screw is probably the most secure one in the heel.

    Forget about glue and toothpicks/matchsticks. They don't provide a rock solid thread to bite into like superglue and sawdust does.
     
  10. SamClemons

    SamClemons Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like the superglue idea as long as you don't make a mess with it. I have also used bits of solder to fill a hole and make a fix as long as the screw in question is not holding a lot of pressure like a neck joint.
     
  11. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    The reason I prefer cyanoacrylate for stripped holes is because of the minimal amount of work involved, and because of how the glue bonds with the wood fiber. I have tried using wood glue, and in my opinion, it creates a weaker hole.

    Of course, if being messy is the norm for.ya, put some tape around the hole to prevent the glue from getting on the finish. But a steady hand holding a toothpick with superglue shouldn't be too tedious of a job. And just takes a few minutes.
     
  12. Spacemanspiff500

    Spacemanspiff500 TDPRI Member

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    The only reason I didn't suggest super glue is it is easy to make a mess of your finish that isn't easy to repair. Wood glue will wipe off clean with a wet rag or paper towel. I don't know how handy you are but the tooth pick method is probably the safest if you don't have a lot of experience with this sort of thing. The only thing that may give you a problem is turning the toothpick cleanly without hurting your finish.
     
  13. Spacemanspiff500

    Spacemanspiff500 TDPRI Member

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    Trimming the toothpick. Stupid auto correct.
     
  14. jwp333

    jwp333 Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Finally got around to addressing this. I wasn't pushing to do it since the guitar has been rattle free since the removal of the pickguard. But I decided to buy a #4 wood screw while at Home Depot today. 1 inch long. It went in firmly and held. I think it has solved the problem. And so far no rattles either. Feeling good.
     
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