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Iconic Alder-Bodied Telecasters?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by NeverStock, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. Big Mike Blues

    Big Mike Blues Tele-Meister

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    If I recall reading from Robben's forum or some such, it's mid 60s. 65 is probably a good guess.
     
  2. psychotelepathic

    psychotelepathic Tele-Holic

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    This guy likes alder....

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Sterling Indigo

    Sterling Indigo Friend of Leo's

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    As a fan of the maple boards, that rosewood sure looks great on the sunburst body! That is one great lookin guitar. Cool picture, thanks!
     
  4. spankdplank

    spankdplank Tele-Afflicted

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    "Robben's is alder.

    I believe Mike Bloomfield's would have been Alder as well.

    Good call on Steve Cropper...Brent Mason's probably is alder I'd guess?"

    My best guess is that none of these guitars are alder, unless they are not the blondes they appear to be. Blonde was the standard finish in the 50's & 60's and those blondes are always ash. The blondes on 60's teles especially are very opaque and creamy, with less would grain showing, and often appear to be a solid white or cream in photos. Ford, Bloomfield and Cropper's guitars, if blonde, are ash. Also, the single layer 8 hole guards were used on the standard blonde/ash models from 59 to I believe 64 or so. The three layer nitrate "greenguards" were only used on the bound Cutoms and custom color models, that were alder. Brent Mason's tele was probably ash, as the majority made at that time were ash, but I have no idea what finish was originally under the grey auto primer (?) paint that's on there now.
     
  5. Whiskeyneck

    Whiskeyneck TDPRI Member

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    I was watching Blind Faith @ Hyde Park this weekend, and I believe, according, to spankdplank's post above, that Clapton's Fraken-Tele was alder. Could see much grain on there.

    Also, sorry I did not look up a pic, I will see if I can get a good one. There are some great closeups of it on the DVD however.

    Peace,
    WN
     
  6. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Both a bit blurry.
     
  7. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    The finish on Blonde 1960's Teles looks opaque in person as well as in photos, mostly because it is.
     
  8. Whiskeyneck

    Whiskeyneck TDPRI Member

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    Are we thinking that Clapton's is Alder? I'm surprised that I can't think of a time when Fender made a Clapton sig Tele. The Strat neck, etc... seems like a natural!
     
  9. jmclaren

    jmclaren Tele-Holic

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    I pulled out an October 2007 Vintage Guitar Magazine. Robben Ford is on the cover and was the featured artist for that issue. In the interview he stated that his Telecaster is a 1960, and is the only one he's ever owned.
     
  10. NeverStock

    NeverStock TDPRI Member

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    Thanks all. I have to say, while some alder telecasters here are somewhat noteworthy, a lot seem arguable, and on the whole, it does not seem as though alder Telecasters were ever really much of a mainstay for rock n roll, rock, or hard rock or even country as we know it. Very interesting...
     
  11. SantiRaf

    SantiRaf TDPRI Member

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    Hi guys, i literally signed up in this forum just to revive this thread, sorry, but i felt the conclusion that the ash bodied tele is in fact more important to the history of rock and blues than the alder bodied might be a little misgiven. I'm sure many, probably most of you know that by now, but for people from all around the world like myself who until today found in this forum an archive of solid knowledge regarding not only telecasters but the universe of solid guitars in general, even not being a part of the discussion, i believe it's important to organize and prevent the dissemination of such a somehow questionable truth.
    Alright. So, i know it was the Telecaster with an ash body the weapon of choice of many larger-than-life guitar gods such as Buchanan, Bloomfield, Greene, Gatton, Ford, Page, Richards and so on and that would lead any logical thinking mind to raise the ash as the ultimate tele tonewood, but i believe the disconsideration of the late 90's, 00's and nowadays rock guitarists is a serious flaw in that way of thinking. I mean, Nancy's cry will be forever in our hearts as one of the most beautiful sounds ever made using 6 silver strings but my point is there's some really and even equally iconic stuff going on in the tele range in the 00's. And those were made using - guess what - exclusively alder. I don't want to make my arguing any longer so i'll just point some names that just can't be disconsidered:

    Dan Auerbach - The Black Keys frontman had in the earlier (and better) days of his the tele as a go-to axe. I identified two: A custom tele in sunburst and what looks like a jerry donahue signature who some say was made in basswood(??). The thing is that his tones, mainly in the Chulahoma album, were great. Just look for the 2007 live version of "Everywhere i Go" on youtube.

    Jack White - in his two solo album tours his main guitar was a daphne blue highway one tele, which is most certainly alder. Sweet fuzzy tones aswell.

    Already mentioned is Frusciante. No comment... I rest my case.

    The conclusion i'm tending to believe is that maybe alder works better for fuzz/distorted tones than ash, which i concluded from various opinions on this forum is more unstabble in therms of variation of quality, and is what you want for really great clean/tube saturated tones. Not that alder doesn't produce good clean tones aswell. Let me know what you think guys, again sorry for reviving the thread. Cheers!
     
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