I wonder if online stores are trying to kill CD sales.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by bassmantweed, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. tdu

    tdu Friend of Leo's

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    There can't really be a significant loss ripping a CD to WAV, AIFF, FLAC, or Apple Lossless. They are all lossless formats.

    Mp3 and AAC are lossy/compressed codecs and are a completely different scenario. They are designed for portability.

    iTunes stores uses 256 kbps AAC for their Plus downloads now. That is fairly high quality. I hope they offer lossless at some point, but at least they are working in the right direction.
     
  2. bassmantweed

    bassmantweed TDPRI Member

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    Not sure i understand this?

    yes i understand convenience over quality we are an increasingly lazy society, that settles for less - I for one do not subscribe to this...... when i listen to music i do so through speakers not .99 cent ear buds.......

    not a conspiracy theory ......... distribution is the name of the game...... there is no need for me to own an asset (some file - lossless or other crappy format.) i should own rights to an asset. If i buy stairway to heaven i shouldn't have to download it to my PC..... transfer it to my ipod..... My ipad.... or my whatever..... i should be able to access that asset from any device i own in it highest quality possible over wifi......

    You say Hard drives are cheap well guess what so is wifi service..... i can see why they would restrict quality over cellular........
     
  3. fezz parka

    fezz parka ---------------------------

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    Simple: Napster devalued recorded music by letting you access it for free. That's why we have $0.99 downloads. The Genie was out of the bottle, and wasn't going back in.
     
  4. Slow Reflexes

    Slow Reflexes Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not so sure about that... $.99 tracks is an Apple thing. I saw Napster more as a giant tasting room, where I was introduced to music that I would otherwise never have bought.

    The way I see it, free samples inspire purchases, whereas selling lossy copies o f portions of an album as a replacement for the actual album kills an industry.
     
  5. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

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    Did you by chance buy those .70 cent blowout CD's off Amazon the other
    day? If so, those turned out to be a price mistake and they cancelled
    the orders, at least they cancelled mine.
     
  6. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    I buy CDs from Amazon. I have found that depending on where the vendor is located and the particular company, you can have you merch in 3- 7 days. Prices and shipping are good to fair and I have yet to have a problem with over 50 CDs purchased.
     
  7. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    on napster
    I remember finding games without frontiers , Peter Gabriel with massive attack version , I really liked it, so I went to the record store and inquired about it, can I buy it, is there more.... They could not find anything
    Get with the program dude
     
  8. DeepDrummer

    DeepDrummer Former Member

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    I buy my CD's from Amazon. I have never had any trouble with Amazon....ever. And I've been buying from them for a long time. I prefer the quality of the music on CD as opposed to downloaded. And then of course I burn them to Mp3 at a loss and store the original CD away. I may have to rethink my plan.
     
  9. Mark Moore

    Mark Moore Tele-Afflicted

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    I buy very little music these days; mainly releases from people I know. I like having a physical CD, but it's not a deal breaker. "Perceived quality" isn't a big deal to me either; mp3 quality is fine as far as I'm concerned--then again, I grew up listening to AM stations on a transistor radio. ;)

    One other thing: Carbonite backup.
     
  10. Vladimir

    Vladimir Friend of Leo's

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    I've bought hundreds of CDs from Amazon, yet I'm not aloud to buy mp3s (not that I really wan't to).
    Musical downloads are subject to different legislature in each country and Amazon (or Apple) has to consider special aggreements in each case.

    Sent from my iPhone using TDPRI
     
  11. Dirty Al

    Dirty Al Tele-Meister

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    I still love vinyl. CD's & MP3's are good for storage but the sound quality still doesn't move me as much as putting a great record on the needle.

    I miss Wolfman Jack.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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  13. tdu

    tdu Friend of Leo's

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    I think .99 cents a track is overvalued. For a 15 track CD, that is $15. Same price as a physical CD... except with very little distribution costs, and no packaging costs.

    Pricing is all based off the old model and it doesn't apply anymore. Even at 50 cents a track for downloads, bands would make way more money per sale than they would have with most old school record contracts because they actually get more of that 50 cents. Any band can get their album on iTunes, Amazon and everything other service for around $25 a year (or less with some submission services). That means everything they make after that is profit. Some services take a % of sales instead of a flat fee. But even so, they % the band get's is still high.

    It's ridiculous to be paying CD prices for downloads that aren't CD quality. 99 cents a track would be more reasonable for FLAC, Apple Lossless, or even Wav/AIFF. But it's too high for MP3 or AAC.
     
  14. emu!

    emu! Poster Extraordinaire

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    I really don't think anybody killed anything.

    It is just the natural process of technology. Why didn't we call record stores 8-track stores when 8-tracks took over...or cassette stores...or CD stores???

    Record stores will survive because they offer RECORDED music. And, as long as they offer something to music listeners in some format, they will be around. The next probably phase will be to have digital music available to people who bring in or buy an empty shuffle. Yeah, consumers can get it over the internet, but there is a social concept that makes record stores attractive to music lovers. You can buy posters, or souvienirs, or tickets there...and maybe a latte. Plus, you get to mingle with other music lovers.
     
  15. tdu

    tdu Friend of Leo's

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    One thing to remember is there are a ton of people who have never had a good record store though. Either because of their age, or just because they live in an area that has never had one. For them the digital downloads are fantastic. I think the demographic is only going to increase as time goes on.
     
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