I want to buy an e-bike conversion kit for my bicycle,,,

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ASATKat, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    You said your bike can't take a front motor hub... does it have carbon forks? Nice thing about a small front motor with planetary gears is it free-wheels when not being used. Direct drive has to be used all the time. I use mine like a passing gear to get around folks, then pedal normally. If I'm against the wind, then I keep it on. of all the options, front hubs are the easiest to install as well.

    This one has a 12 mile battery, which is what I had originally. I now have the 20 mile battery, but the 12 mile was fine, and never went dead in my normal daily rides. This company is in Seattle, and customer service is very good IME.

    https://hilltopperbikes.com/product...MIwN3Qx8XV5AIVsSCtBh1AnQCEEAQYAiABEgIK_fD_BwE
     
  2. trouserpress

    trouserpress Tele-Holic

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    This is true but imo it is more than worth the expenses.

    A friend of mine had bought one and within no time 4 more people we know had to have one installed as well. The whole system is nearly unremarkable and the power cell looks like a thermos flask. On it is a switch that lets you choose between 25%-50%-75% and max. power supply. It is a strong, unkapputtable and very elegant piece of engineering.
     
  3. Wallo Tweed

    Wallo Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    Here's another vote for buying an e bike over a conversion.

    A friend who is a below the knee amputee recently bought an e bike that is capable of moving without pedaling in case he has trouble with his prosthesis while on a ride. I went with him to pick it out. We rode bikes with the battery mounted on the rear rack, and ones with the battery in the down tube.

    The rear mount battery models felt a bit awkward compared to down tube models.

    Another friend bought a cheap rear wheel drive kit online. It felt squirriely to me when I rode it. After a few months he broke 2 spokes and he told me he was unable to find replacements.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
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  4. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yes. Behind my earlier post was recalling how my father in law had some falls on his Townie because that chopper style front and very sit upright rear had poor weight distribution. A conversion I tried that an associate had time and money into was not the strange geometry of the Townie but still with a lot of weight toward the back. My bro got his woman a modern bike designed to have e-assist plus for her 4'9" big 27.5 wheels and he got a 29r. They repeat that modern wheels, decent Shimano brakes, balanced weight and a decent cargo rack are why they're using them often.

    These handling and design issues might not be as important for everyone but wow did I notice it whether my time trying stuff or the input from associates.
     
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  5. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    With my townie conversion the entire kit only adds 7 lbs, half of that is down on the front hub and the other half is on the rack just under the seat I don't even notice the weight and it rides the same as it did without the kit. That said, townies do ride differently because of the feet forward design, with or without an e-kit. Meant for cruising only, not high speed. When the kit was on my comfort or mountain style bike I didn't notice the weight either, but it's a better handling bike as far as higher speed and quick moves.
     
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  6. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Check out Luna Cycles. They sell great kits, and they provide great service. Lots of YouTube videos to help you. I put a 500W, 52V Bafang direct
    drive (mounts on bottom bracket) system on my hardtail mtb. I bought a BIG battery-- 1 kwh-- I can go 25mph for 50 miles. A smaller battery
    pack would be cheaper.

    With the Bafang motors you have a pedal sensing system and can adjust the amount of assist somewhat. You can also add a thumb driven
    throttle, which is nice if you want to get going quickly when a light turns from red to green.

    Lunacycles has a full range of kits so you can build anything from a slowpoke, cheap hub drive up to a ludicrous vehicle that you can
    race motorcycles with.

    https://lunacycle.com/
     
  7. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    Hi Ari, I looked at the GRM iMotor on Amazon, I see what you mean it's better. I like, it gets 5 stars from how many I don't know. It's super easy to install. And has the sort of power I'm looking for, maybe a tinge overkill, but I'll wont be maxing it.

    Bafang and jaxpety look much harder to install. Plus my bike's shape may make it hard to find a place to put everything.
    But these products get high ratings. I was looking at a Jaxpety kit that if I was going to buy a disassembled one this would be a good choice.

    This is the bike I have to work with, not standard shape.

    https://www.google.com/shopping/pro...KP9YpHQYYqxD8-ToIEbZ18As_3tDVSNRoCE_EQAvD_BwE
     
  8. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    240W is pretty darn weak. Good luck going up a hill or carrying loads with it. I would rather have at least 500W so the motor isn't
    straining under normal loads.
     
  9. Torren61

    Torren61 Friend of Leo's

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    permission granted... next thread
     
  10. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    250 watts is fine, depending on where you ride etc. Also good on front fork installations without needing torque arms to prevent the motor's torque breaking the dropouts, and spinning off the forks. I go up steep hills pedaling with the motor just fine. But then most of the riding in my town is level, with occasional short hills. The 250 Watt Bafangs are pretty bulletproof. Been in use all over Asia for many years.
     
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