I USED TO THINK A DAY LIKE TODAY WASN'T POSSIBLE (sober content).

Kandinskyesque

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
2,170
Location
Scotland
I'm just home from a long drive, through the fog, after giving a talk at the rehab I crawled through the doors of 10 years ago today.
I'm wary of thinking that it's an achievement of my own. It's most definitely not.
There's a whole load of clean and sober people who led me by the hand to get here, for whom I could never repay other than to pay it forward.

Giving a talk to people just in rehab was an absolute privilege, that feeling of usefulness, lending them hope that was loaned to me when I had none, gave tonight a buzz at least equal to the best gig I've ever played.

I've a real affinity with the big house on Glasgow's south side where my clean and sober journey began.

Nearly 28 years ago, I stood in the car park of a pub opposite the rehab, smoking a jazz woodbine with my brother and a couple of friends. We were celebrating the birth of my daughter the day before, which was also the day of the first UK lottery draw.
While we were discussing our fantasies of what we would do with our winnings, if or when our numbers came up, a cold reality hit me.

I turned to my brother and my friends and said...
"Promise me something! If I ever win the lottery, stick me in that rehab building across the road or I'll be dead in 6 months!"

Fast forward 18 years, and I've still never won a brass farthing on the lottery but I'm crawling/staggering through the doors of that same rehab building with the prospect of missing my daughter's 18th birthday party in a week's time.

My daughter tells me every year that her favourite birthday present ever was me going in there and coming out a month later clean and sober. She got her dad back, she tells me.

Going there tonight, 10 years after my first time in the place and nearly 28 years after being honest enough to admit I had a problem whilst standing in the shadow of the place, felt like I've just completed an ever-increasing circle.

I can't guarantee I be able to go back next year but I'll promise myself tomorrow I'll do my best to keep it in the day. Just like I've promised myself each day for the last 3653 days.

I've no idea why I've posted this, other than seeing my thoughts turn into black pixels on my screen seem like a better option than having them swim around between my ears.
 

kuch

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Posts
2,213
Location
Great Northwest
long post, but I read all of it.
Congrats on your success!! I think it's great that you've come to the realization that there were other people who helped you get to where you are now.
But, in my opinion, you deserve a lot of credit for this accomplishment. You're the one who fought off the impulse to give in whenever it came up.

I don't know you but I'm proud of what you've done.

Keep up the good fight!!

:)
 

WingedWords

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 4, 2015
Posts
3,457
Location
UK Europe.
I'm just home from a long drive, through the fog, after giving a talk at the rehab I crawled through the doors of 10 years ago today.
I'm wary of thinking that it's an achievement of my own. It's most definitely not.
There's a whole load of clean and sober people who led me by the hand to get here, for whom I could never repay other than to pay it forward.

Giving a talk to people just in rehab was an absolute privilege, that feeling of usefulness, lending them hope that was loaned to me when I had none, gave tonight a buzz at least equal to the best gig I've ever played.

I've a real affinity with the big house on Glasgow's south side where my clean and sober journey began.

Nearly 28 years ago, I stood in the car park of a pub opposite the rehab, smoking a jazz woodbine with my brother and a couple of friends. We were celebrating the birth of my daughter the day before, which was also the day of the first UK lottery draw.
While we were discussing our fantasies of what we would do with our winnings, if or when our numbers came up, a cold reality hit me.

I turned to my brother and my friends and said...
"Promise me something! If I ever win the lottery, stick me in that rehab building across the road or I'll be dead in 6 months!"

Fast forward 18 years, and I've still never won a brass farthing on the lottery but I'm crawling/staggering through the doors of that same rehab building with the prospect of missing my daughter's 18th birthday party in a week's time.

My daughter tells me every year that her favourite birthday present ever was me going in there and coming out a month later clean and sober. She got her dad back, she tells me.

Going there tonight, 10 years after my first time in the place and nearly 28 years after being honest enough to admit I had a problem whilst standing in the shadow of the place, felt like I've just completed an ever-increasing circle.

I can't guarantee I be able to go back next year but I'll promise myself tomorrow I'll do my best to keep it in the day. Just like I've promised myself each day for the last 3653 days.

I've no idea why I've posted this, other than seeing my thoughts turn into black pixels on my screen seem like a better option than having them swim around between my ears.
You're putting the work in everyday. Enjoy the rewards. And so great to hear how you're giving back to people still struggling.
I know how good it still feels to have finally stopped smoking on 14th Feb 1999.
 

1stpitch

Tele-Holic
Silver Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Posts
735
Location
South Carolina, USA
I'm just home from a long drive, through the fog, after giving a talk at the rehab I crawled through the doors of 10 years ago today.
I'm wary of thinking that it's an achievement of my own. It's most definitely not.
There's a whole load of clean and sober people who led me by the hand to get here, for whom I could never repay other than to pay it forward.

Giving a talk to people just in rehab was an absolute privilege, that feeling of usefulness, lending them hope that was loaned to me when I had none, gave tonight a buzz at least equal to the best gig I've ever played.

I've a real affinity with the big house on Glasgow's south side where my clean and sober journey began.

Nearly 28 years ago, I stood in the car park of a pub opposite the rehab, smoking a jazz woodbine with my brother and a couple of friends. We were celebrating the birth of my daughter the day before, which was also the day of the first UK lottery draw.
While we were discussing our fantasies of what we would do with our winnings, if or when our numbers came up, a cold reality hit me.

I turned to my brother and my friends and said...
"Promise me something! If I ever win the lottery, stick me in that rehab building across the road or I'll be dead in 6 months!"

Fast forward 18 years, and I've still never won a brass farthing on the lottery but I'm crawling/staggering through the doors of that same rehab building with the prospect of missing my daughter's 18th birthday party in a week's time.

My daughter tells me every year that her favourite birthday present ever was me going in there and coming out a month later clean and sober. She got her dad back, she tells me.

Going there tonight, 10 years after my first time in the place and nearly 28 years after being honest enough to admit I had a problem whilst standing in the shadow of the place, felt like I've just completed an ever-increasing circle.

I can't guarantee I be able to go back next year but I'll promise myself tomorrow I'll do my best to keep it in the day. Just like I've promised myself each day for the last 3653 days.

I've no idea why I've posted this, other than seeing my thoughts turn into black pixels on my screen seem like a better option than having them swim around between my ears.
Congrats
 

PhoenixBill

Tele-Holic
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Posts
926
Age
62
Location
Phoenix
Congratulations! Getting sober was a turning point in my life too. Sadly I have seen far too many folks who have succumbed to the disease of addiction, including the woman I loved…found her dead on my living room floor. As I related in another thread, another woman I love dearly is spiraling towards that same bitter end. On the other hand, we see folks like you who turned it around and have a new life. Way to go!
 

danielreid27

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Aug 16, 2022
Posts
1,284
Age
66
Location
Toronto,On,Ca
sereneee.jpg
 




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