I Swear This Will Be My Last Gibson

Discussion in 'Acoustic Heaven' started by zombywoof, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. teleman1

    teleman1 Tele-Holic

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    Mr Woof,

    Do you or have you played slide on it? I have a 65 LG-1 Sounds sweet,incredible for slide, but low on the volume side. I have tried a late 40's or mid 50's LG-1 at Norms rare guitars. I turned to mark,(the guy who went to Gibson), I asked "whats with this, it is as loud as a Hummingbird". He said, "Man, its the wood. Aged wood".
     
  2. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    The LG-2 that remained with me the longest as a 1947 script logo guitar. Its staying power though had a lot to do with the fact it was the last full year for the 1 3/4" nut. I found the best feature of LG-2s to be their punchy, heavy mids which brought to mind a really good archtop. But the 1940s guitars were all over the place. I once had a 1947 LG-2 in the house with my '46. Those guitars sounded so different you would not think they rolled out of the same factory. Then again, in those days a part was considered finished when it looked "close enough."

    The L-1s and LG-2s though were very different beasts. I have heard people say that the L-1s were so different it seems like they must have been built on Mars. As I said beginning in 1933 Gibson almost yearly bulked up the guitars. Weight was increased even more in 1936 when they started adding bolts to the bridges. I am convinced that one of the reasons Gibson went to scalloped bracing in their X braced guitars (other than Martin was doing it) was to lighten things up. As far as builds though, an early 1930s L1, even though it had a wider lower bout than the LG-2, clocks it at no more than 3 lbs which is about 13 to 14 ounces lighter than the 1940s scalloped braced LG-2s.

    I do know more than a few folks though who think early 1950s Gibsons have a certain magic to them. Gibson had not only just come under new management but had retooled and reorganized. Lots of changes coming in. Headstocks lost their taper and went to full thickness, necks got a shallower C carve, while the stiffened fabric side stays began disappearing. Did not happen all at once, of course, so the guitars can have a pretty interesting mix of specs. All part of the fun with transition era Gibsons.
     
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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Interesting, thanks for the info. The neck on my '51 is at least medium C leaning toward thick a touch, The nut is 1-11/16. I cant do 1.75 nut .
     
  4. howardlo

    howardlo Tele-Holic

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    Nice guitar! Really like 12 fret guitars.
     
  5. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    The L1 has a scary thin bridge plate measuring only around .040" thick which means stringing it with heavier gauges strings is not going to happen. I have a couple of long scale ladder braced Kays that I use for slide.


    The LG1, of course, started off in 1942 as an all-mahogany X braced guitar, Very few were built (Gibson issued a run of 50 of them in 2013) and when it re-emerged in 1946 it was transformed into a ladder braced, spruce top guitar. As your LG1 was built in 1965 it should have that bolted down hollow plastic bridge on it and a soft spruce bridge plate. If so, have you thought about having them replaced?. They offer little in the way of supporting the top. If you are not so inclined, just keep an eye out for that telltale hump developing under the bridge.
     
  6. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    I always felt the key to the 12 fretters is they shifted everything south which placed the bridge more central in the lower bout. Unlike Martin, which altered the body to accommodate different necks, Gibson used the same body for 12, 13 ad 14 fret necks.
     
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  7. Post-HK

    Post-HK Tele-Meister

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    Oooh yeah...congrats!
     
  8. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    wow. congrats! looks amazing, and would hope to hear it someday or play one - but haven't really come across any. Those flattops from the 30's could apparently be very, very special guitars.

    As far as the tiger-stripe pickguards go, I don't really have any first hand knowledge, but from pictures I've seen, it was not unheard of, at least. Gibson has used that style quite a bit in the re-issues they have offered for L-series and for the Advanced Jumbo. I can't recall if they have offered a Roy Smeck style reissue or not, but a lot of folks seem to think that's a holy grail guitar in the original versions.

    Here's a few photos of 30's era Gibson flattops with the tiger stripe or something sort of tiger-stripe-ish anyway. I have no idea what was available as far as pickguard material goes at that time:
    Gibson 35 and 36 Smecks.jpg

    Gibson 30's L-00 at Dave's.jpg

    1936-Gibson-L-00 TVG.jpg
     
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  9. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    Not the pickguard but the top finish. Glued on pickguards first appear on Gibson ftattops in 1932. Striped tort scratchplates were fairly common in the 1930s and continue to show up on some Banners. They all but disappear after WWII. This one on my 1933 (based on the binding) Gibson-made Recording King mandolin remains my favorite. You can really see where the name "Firestripe" comes from.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2019
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  10. mimmo

    mimmo Friend of Leo's

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    Wow, congratulations!
     
  11. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    yep. Wow! thanks for the photos and the info. I can see what you're saying about the sort flame/tiger stripe in the finish. Glad to know that guitar is in good hands.
     
  12. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    My last one was the cheapest...having never owned one
     
  13. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

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    That looks awesome, I've been enamored by a number of 12 fret small body acoustics built long ago but have yet to own one.
     
  14. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Great guitar!

    5F01675B-A4B6-495B-B093-96F845AF80AB.jpeg

    There’s my 1930 L-1 on the right and I love it. Someone mentions these being great slide guitars and I have to agree.

    Here’s me playing my L-1. I took an adult Ed course on country slide this quarter and this was my version of a medley of country blues, “Bad Moon Rising,” “These Boots are Made for Walking,” and “Folsom Prison Blues.”

    Sorry about the awful, tinny sound. I recorded it on my phone. The Gibson actually is loud with lots of bass and resonance.

    Also, sorry about the playing and arrangement. I’m new to slide and never made an arrangement before.

     
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  15. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    Nice! I would guess the J45 next to the L1 is a 1953-1954? I also own a 1942 J50. The low end on it is bottomless. So deep it would make a pre-War Martin D-28 Herringbone run for cover.
     
  16. rob2

    rob2 Tele-Holic

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    ....bloody hell,that is simply stunning!...and what are those bridge pins made of?
     
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  17. Greggorios

    Greggorios Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    ...yes, please sir, a little close up on the hand rubbed top would be much appreciated! Congrats, that's stunning and a guitar for life.
     
  18. zombywoof

    zombywoof Friend of Leo's

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    They are non-slotted hard celluloid so most likely the originals.
     
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  19. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Holic

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    There are certain things I have learned not to say in my lifetime. Turns out that anything that remotely resembles swearing off the purchase of another guitar is very close to the top of that list. Congrats on the awesome guitar, and best of luck upholding your oath!
     
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  20. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Friend of Leo's

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    I never swore off but about 20 years ago I realised i had the complete set and never needed to buy another guitar

    That is about 25 to 30 guitar purchases ago
     
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