I need some country licks that don't shred.

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by stax, Dec 12, 2014.

  1. stax

    stax Tele-Afflicted

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    You know what, that is exactly what I was doing and why I asked in the first place after watching the 'what chord is Red playing' thread, obviously he is an brilliant player and does stuff I could never imagine doing but a lot of it is doable, a brilliant player that doesn't just rely on speed.
     
  2. motwang

    motwang Tele-Afflicted

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    He really is an inspiration to us that a little less gifted! He throws some bass notes, double stops, jazz chords into the mix and yet can sound like.... Well, Redd Volkaert !!!!
     
  3. eclipse

    eclipse Tele-Meister

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    :(
     
  4. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Sorry, buddy. I thought you actually wanted help playing some country guitar. Out and on with it,
    JB
     
  5. RCinMempho

    RCinMempho Friend of Leo's

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    To the cheap and easy department we go...

    Doubling a note is big especially the open G, B, and E. Hammer on or slide to the fifth or fourth fret from a half step down from the open string. Let that dissonance ring. It's a bit bluegrassy, but it's not a like that shows up much in other styles. Slow gives you one thing. Putting that in a single string run changes the entire character. Or play the two strings over and over (16th notes) with the sliding up thing just on the beats.

    Speaking of sliding up a 1/2 step... You can slide up a fret into any double stop - but don't do it once. Two or three times in rapid succession. That's the ticket. (Think grace notes). If you are essentially playing the melody, this little trick can hold you through points where the melody stays on one note and you don't have another idea to play.

    Big octave jumps are your buddy. In country you can literally change octaves on each phrase of a solo. It's so common the listener's ear will follow and it offers a cheap and easy way to avoid repeating a phrase exactly.

    Use chromatic double stops to move from one chord inversion to another or to the next chord change. Fortunately God put those on every fret so they are easy to find.

    Volume swells. If you can do them with your volume knob or pedal then you can milk at least two solos a night doing nothing different but the swells.

    Oh, and pre-bend up a step to the root note before that final resolution. Then release that bend down the b7.

    Hope this helps you cheat playing Your Cheatin' Heart.
     
  6. prebend

    prebend Tele-Holic

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    No ifs, ands, or buts. This is the way.
     
  7. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

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