I need advice on soldering.

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Digiplay, Dec 7, 2019.

  1. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    I'm swapping the pu's on my 50's Roadworn, and I need some advice on soldering.


    I've looked at several YouTube video's, and it seems that on the handful of times that I have soldered in my life, it turns out I have been doing it TOTALLY wrong (I always put the solder tip on the solder wire) :)


    Now that I'm armed and ready to start soldering the new pu's wires, I'm curious if I need to completely remove the existing solder and start over with new solder, or if there is enough remaining solder after I have taken the original wires off, can I use what's left for the new wires?
     
  2. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    just how much solder did you put on those old connections, @Digiplay ???

    2 thoughts from a hack-solderer -
    1/ get yourself a solder-sucker, for tidying up;
    2/ be a big-spender and use fresh solder on those connections on the new wires

    Peace - Deeve
     
  3. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    You can usually just tin the wires and solder them right on. Use a hot iron.
     
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  4. boop

    boop Tele-Meister

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    You can "reflow" the solder by heating everything up. If you have excess solder on the joint you can scoop some of it up with the iron tip and wipe it off on a damp sponge or paper towel. As Chunkocater said, you can usually flow solder into the end of each wire, and then just heat em together without additional solder. The flux in new solder (the stuff that smokes off that you don't want to inhale) helps the solder adhere to the metal, but if both wires have a good coating you can just reflow with what you have on there.

    You'll know a good solder joint when you see one
    [​IMG]
    http://www.dansmc.com/soldering.htm
     
  5. 2 Headed Goat

    2 Headed Goat Friend of Leo's

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    Use a damp sponge or paper towel, to wipe the soldering iron tip clean before and after each use. Ensure that the solder tip is properly tinned. Look up this procedure on YT.
    Finally, always apply a small bit of solder to the tip before placing the soldering iron down or in the holder. This prolongs the tip and keeps the heat from burning thru the 'tinning' for lack of a better phrase.
     
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  6. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    Hi Deere!

    The solder on the old connections is the original factory solder :)


    I'm going to put a small amount of fresh solder on the new wires, so I was asking about the solder that was still on the terminals/pots that were soldered by Fender.
     
  7. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    In that case, @Chunkocaster 's suggestion to re-flow makes sense.
    The picture in my head was an appalling scene of pooled-up dull-grey cold-solder.
    Glad to hear you're referring to a factory set-up (prolly done right)

    Peace - Deeve
     
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  8. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    Hi boop and 2 Headed Goat!

    I bought a Weller WLC100, Goot Heat Clips, and some WYCTIN 60-40 Tin lead rosin core solder wire on Amazon, so I hope that's what I need :)
     
  9. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    All good advice .....only thing I would add is to be sure and use flux on the new wire ends, and be sure you're heating whatever you're soldering and THEN adding solder, and not just heating solder from a spool and "dropping" it onto the components. For years, I mistakenly thought I could put liquid (heated) solder on two things, and they would "stick". It's important that they are hot enough to "accept" the solder.
    Certainly not brain surgery, but with practice it becomes second nature.
     
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  10. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    The original solder job is so good is why I was scared Deeve, but I hope I'm just over thinking, and all I need to do is what my truly appreciated fellow Forum Members suggest I do :)
     
  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Using new solder gives you the rosin flux to better etch the surfaces and grip.
    Clean off the old pots and wires the best you can.

    You'll have the best luck by doing this:
    -sand a spot on the back of a pot (if it's new) to heat and put a little solder on there
    -heat the wire(s) you want to put there and put solder on the wires.
    -now press the wire(s) to the pot with the iron, putting just a little more solder at the iron where it touches the wires (this will transfer the heat faster to the blob and not cook the pot.
    -use a wood stick/pencil to hold the wires in place when you take away the iron.

    Do the above and you can use an inexpensive Harbor Freight $10 iron instead of the $100 soldering station.

    .
     
  12. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    That's the way I always soldered in the past as well nojazzhere :)


    But like Danny Vermin said in Johnny Dangerously,

    "You shouldn't hang me on a hook, Johnny. My father hung me on a hook once........................... Once.".
     
  13. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Holic

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    I almost never have to put new solder when soldering a lead to a lug. I even often do not even put solder on the lead itself, just a bit on the soldering iron tip.
    Just be aware to have a hot enough iron to make a good solder joint.
     
  14. vid1900

    vid1900 Tele-Meister

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    Old solder joints are oxidized, and can be tough to melt.

    A dab of Flux will make them instantly melt, by cleaning off the oxidation.

    THE most important part of soldering is the Flux. If the joint is not clean, it won't stick.

    A dab of Flux on the back of the pots will again magically make the solder **wet up** and stick beautify .

    https://www.parts-express.com/caig-rsf-r80-2-deoxit-rosin-soldering-flux-jar-56g--341-221

    -

    A big, old fashion solder gun can quickly heat up those pots, where a little solder pencil will take forever - BUT keep the solder gun far from your pickups as it will demagnetize them.

    341-221_HR_0.jpg
     
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  15. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    Hi Chunkocaster!

    The Weller WLC100 is adjustable up to 40 watts.

    What temperature would you recommend I use?
     
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  16. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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  17. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Meister

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    Generally speaking, always use a hot iron and work quickly. A 60 watt iron will solder just about anything, but don't leave it on there too long. A cooler iron used for a longer period will heat the pot up more, so increasing the chance of damaging it.

    If you can find an old pot to practice on, its worth the effort.
     
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  18. mmekler

    mmekler NEW MEMBER!

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    About to jump into the same project and this is the best video I have found on Youtube yet on how to create a clean, new connection after cleaning. IMHO the fact that the original soldering was good does not guarantee a good clean future connection.
     
  19. coolidge

    coolidge Tele-Meister

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    Tip: Punch it in the face with heat quickly, then remove the iron. You don't want to be holding an underpowered iron on the connection trying to heat it up.

    Tip: Heat flows from the iron tip through a dab of clean solder on the tip to the connection. This is very important, the dab of solder is the conduit for heat to travel. If your iron tip is dry it takes a lot longer to transfer heat from the iron to the connection. The longer the iron sits on the connection the farther out heat spreads beyond the connection point.

    Tip: Cut a sponge backed green kitchen scouring pad in half and wet the sponge. Wipe your soldering iron tip on the very damp sponge before each soldering attempt.

    Tip: Here I'm using multi-wire ground lugs (I use in amp building) soldered to the back of pots.

    ground1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2019
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  20. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

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    I'm more confident of the pot soldering, and the reason I bought the heat clips for the terminal soldering.


    I'm still a little confused about the 5 soldering points I have to solder.

    1) Can I simply use the existing solder that's there?
    2) If not, do I need to remove the old solder with a solder wick?
    3) Do I need to use solder flux?
    4) If I need to use solder flux, and as I want to do the project this weekend, can I go and buy some from Home Depot or Lowe's (they are both close to me)? If not I'll order the recommended solder flux online, and I'll postpone installing the new pu's until I receive it.
     
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