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I need a new book.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by imwjl, Jan 16, 2021.

  1. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    My problems are.

    1) Tending to read non-fiction and behavioral economics stuff where it's complex and I go off into tangents reading the references and supporting material.
    2) Staying with same authors.
    3) Find lots of popular fiction too predictable.
    4) Not often liking Sci Fi but did or do like Vonnegut and the David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas, The Bone Clocks).

    In consideration:

    1) Finish Factfulness or buy it - the loan ran out.
    2) More Yuval Noah Harari - Everyone should read his Sapiens book.
    3) I should finish The Nutanix Bible but that's for work.
    4) 1, 2 & 3 don't solve my almost always reading non-fiction.
     
  2. 1955

    1955 Doctor of Teleocity

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    I read for specific purposes now. For instance, if I need to learn about something that might help me solve a problem, I will research it.

    I also enjoy weighing other people’s opinions against subjects that interest me.

    Back in high school and college I read everything perhaps an English major might’ve displayed on their cinderblock bookshelf, but now I feel that it was extremely dangerous and irresponsible.
     
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  3. Steerforth

    Steerforth Friend of Leo's

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    Here, this will keep you busy for a good long while, especially if you chase down all the related stuff and read it.

    I’ve got a big pile of related stuff in my waiting-to-be-read queue if I ever finish the one that I’m reading now. It’s not light fare.

    The Temple of Man by R. A. Schwaller de Lubicz
     
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  4. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Over the Wire by Andrew Carswell

    On the night of 17 January 1943, 19 year old Pilot Officer Andy Carswell bailed out of his burning Lancaster over Germany after a night bombing raid on Berlin.

    www.nationalpost.com
    Look under NP comment for the article by his son, John Carswell.

    The greatest generation for sure.
     
  5. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Afflicted

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    It's just the two volumes, you'll finish it in no time.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. Grandy

    Grandy Tele-Holic

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    I've also been interested in behavioral economics and neuroscience. A lot of that stuff is way beyond me. The psychology of it is fascinating though. Since this is a music forum may I suggest Daniel Levitin: This is your brain on music.

    And if 1, 2 and 3 don't solve the issue try 1 2 3 4 by Paul Auster.
     
    1955 likes this.
  7. drewg

    drewg Tele-Meister

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    You've got some books on there that have tweaked my attention.

    -Shogun? (James Clavell). Samurai Japan. A western sea captain, emperor, love story, plenty of action. Quite engrossing, I want to read it again. You'll even learn Japanese words and concepts.

    -Notre Dame de Paris– Victor Hugo. (The Hunchback of Notre Dame). The underworld of Paris, thieves, gypsies.

    -You want unpredictability? How about any of Julio Cortázar short stories. Maybe start with "The Night Face-Up" (or "Upside Down Night"? Not sure how they translated "La noche boca arriba"). It's about an Aztec 'guerra florida" (flowered war?). Another surprise ending: Axolotl.

    These are some of my all-time favorites.(I usually only read fiction).
     
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  8. drewg

    drewg Tele-Meister

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    I'd like to hear more about your last sentence, "dangerous and irresponsible." How so?
     
    1955 likes this.
  9. blue metalflake

    blue metalflake Doctor of Teleocity

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    Read Shogun more than 20 years ago and loved it. Aside from the story I found the bits of language and culture fascinating.
     
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  10. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    I started selling books 25 years ago and have operated the current incarnation of my business for the last 22 years. I concentrate on books issued in limited editions by US fine presses, but have some diverse stock, as well.

    When I want to read something I just pull something out of inventory, unless its in a pristine condition I need to maintain. I find that there is sufficient classic and later literature to occupy a lifetime of reading. Baudelaire, Shakespeare, Shaw, Morley, Fitzgerald, Bronte, etc. all get the job done. I do read books set in modern times, but sticking only to modern times limits reading to a small set of books that have been written. Most fiction is set in the present, no matter what year or era that present was when the book was written.

    There are also things I read routinely, like the Nero Wolfe detective mysteries by Rex Stout and the complete Sherlock Holmes cannon by Arthur Conan Doyle. I reread those every 2 or 3 years.
     
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  11. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Have you read Cryptonomicon?
     
  12. catdaddy

    catdaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    Given your mention of Yuval Noah Harari's Sapiens, have you read Homo Deus?

    If Vonnegut's and Mitchell's quirky sci-fi stuff is to your liking, I highly recommend Margaret Atwood's Mad Adam Trilogy.

    Try Timothy Hallinan's Pulped for an unpredictable fiction fix.
     
  13. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm not sure how to interpret the last sentence. My parents encouraged reading a lot and maybe one of the greatest gifts from my dad who died young was read things that might not fit with how you feel or believe.

    For the rest, I mostly read e books these days and spent time reading highlights and notes from Sapiens, and doh, found I can re-check out the Kindle books from library system so am finishing a loan that ran out earlier - The Lost Art Of Reading Nature's Signs by Tristan Gooley.

    Our state's digital content library now shows your place in line for some e book checkouts so I'm hoping to coordinate same time loans of paper and electronic version in the near future. Physical book for sitting in the sun room, e book for work breaks.

    Thanks for the suggestions. Some are books I read long ago.

    P.S. I'm also enjoying Apple's News+ more than ever. The library a mile from home only has pickup now but there are 300+ magazines and papers in that subscription. It's a digital version of a trek to the library.
     
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  14. Ben Bishop

    Ben Bishop Tele-Meister

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    I've been reading books on war. It's an extension of my interest in organizations and in management. I read a bunch of books on management and it was mostly nonsense - 300 pages to describe some principle that really should have been a thirty page magazine article. Military management? I paraphrase Eisenhower "planning is essential. plans are useless" Talk about moving targets! (Insert bagpipers joke here.) Try reading some John Keegan. I recommend starting with The Face of Battle and that'll get you hooked. The Barbara Tuchman oeuvre is getting old but I'd reread A Distant Mirror, The Zimmermann Telegram and Stilwell in China. If ethnographic elements interest you then grab a few books on the experience of T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia). These days I'm trying to read more on the Silk Road but aside from a few worthy books on Genghis Khan and his descendants I'm only getting academic details or big sloppy sweeps. Oh, you wanted less non-fiction?
     
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  15. DLReed

    DLReed Tele-Meister

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    Have you read anything by Haruki Murakami? The wind-up bird chronicle.
     
  16. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    I got on a slight Ike kick in recent years. It started knowing modern software apps replicate his 4 squares for prioritizing, and a revisit of vague memories from a boomer childhood.

    You might like the Sapiens book I've suggested often. A warning is some religious acquaintances loved it and some had a problem because of the overall timeline. I think that difference is my very religious associates who remember how many religions and cultures we have in the world vs some who are very focused and only knowing one religion.

    You might also like 48 Laws of Power - by Robert Greene
     
  17. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Every Time I Discover the Meaning of Life, They Change It (Daniel Klein)

    and

    The Design of Everyday Things (Don Norman)
     
  18. rand z

    rand z Friend of Leo's

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    Life of Pi
    by Yann Martel.

    Deep Fiction.
     
  19. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    That is a wonderful book.

    Another fascinating book that links music and neuroscience is Musicophilia, by Oliver Sacks. Remember the Robin Williams/Robert Deniro film Awakenings? It's a story based on Sacks' L-dopa research.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. MisterZ

    MisterZ Tele-Holic

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    If you want to go fiction, albeit based on historical facts, try Patrick O'Brian. 20+ volumes of the Aubrey-Maturin series should keep you going for a couple of weeks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2021
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