I might be one of the first synthesizer players in the world

teleman1

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Yeah. Transistor radios came out in the early 60's. When I was 6 or 7, I got my first transistor radio, red. It had volume and an AM dial. The back was off immediately, LOOK, a Battery! I found that if you ran your finger over the electronics under the cover, one spot would get a high pitch note. I think it was louder than the am station it was set to. I'd have a blast cause it bent the note a bit, albeit, one note. Pitch shift.

For you youngins, this was the FIRST time ever to walk mobile listening to your transistor radio held up to your head. Local tv in LA had maybe 6-7 channels & no recording or streaming with it. If you wanted music playing longer than 20 minutes in your home of your own chosen music: Reel to reel tape machine. TV was Black & white. Children were the family's remote control. Movie theatres were the best media viewing source, but their audio systems were primitive.

Pretty soon everything around us will be primitive. They will figure a way to wire a patch on us that enables us to think of the video & audio we hear through an interface to any and all of your electronics. You would be able to think the equalization your want to hear and put a fuzz tone through your TV if you wanted to be insane.
 

Telekarster

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If you wanted music playing longer than 20 minutes in your home of your own chosen music: Reel to reel tape machine. TV was Black & white. Children were the family's remote control. Movie theatres were the best media viewing source, but their audio systems were primitive.

Yep... that's about right! Gosh... has it really been that long?
 

bottlenecker

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Yeah. Transistor radios came out in the early 60's. When I was 6 or 7, I got my first transistor radio, red. It had volume and an AM dial. The back was off immediately, LOOK, a Battery! I found that if you ran your finger over the electronics under the cover, one spot would get a high pitch note. I think it was louder than the am station it was set to. I'd have a blast cause it bent the note a bit, albeit, one note. Pitch shift.

For you youngins, this was the FIRST time ever to walk mobile listening to your transistor radio held up to your head. Local tv in LA had maybe 6-7 channels & no recording or streaming with it. If you wanted music playing longer than 20 minutes in your home of your own chosen music: Reel to reel tape machine. TV was Black & white. Children were the family's remote control. Movie theatres were the best media viewing source, but their audio systems were primitive.

Pretty soon everything around us will be primitive. They will figure a way to wire a patch on us that enables us to think of the video & audio we hear through an interface to any and all of your electronics. You would be able to think the equalization your want to hear and put a fuzz tone through your TV if you wanted to be insane.

I took apart a walkie talkie when I was a child and found a bunch of points on the circuit board that would make different bleeps and bloops. I made a little "robot" out of a 2 liter bottle and glued the board and speaker in, with a robot face drawn on paper inside the bottle. Hillbilly R2D2.
 

Flip G

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If you haven't seen this documentary, I think you would like it. It starts off with teenagers adapting technical drawings from Popular Mechanics to create drum pads and primitive keyboard devices in the 60s. Much Kratwerk, Gary Numan, and The Human League to be had.



It also reminded me of the existence of the song "Warm Leatherette" which I used to dance to like a maniac in the 80s.

 

Digital Larry

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My dad had a million cassette recorders. Of course I got one to play with.

I figured out that if you added an extension speaker then you could get an external mic (don't think it had an internal one) to feed back. Combined with the AGC it would pulsate and chirp. I made a 90 minute tape of "beeps and boops" which pre-saged my current run at the top of the charts. cough cough
 

David Barnett

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I got my first guitar amplifier, a Vox Cambridge Reverb, for Christmas when I was in the 8th grade.

One of the first things I tried was to plug a cord into the extension speaker outlet and plug that into one of the inputs. Instant oscillator! And all the controls changed the frequency of the oscillation. Plus I could add reverb and trem. I got hours of fun out of that, and never blew anything up.
 

David Barnett

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The volume control controlled not only the volume, but the frequency. When I first cracked it open, it would be a very low frequency, like I could count the clicks. But it quickly went across the audible frequency spectrum as I turned it up, and would go above the range of my 13 year old ears, so the useful range was between about 0 and 2 on the dial, and the top of that range was piercingly loud. The tone controls were like fine-tuning adjustments for the frequency, plus one could still hear them acting as tone controls.

I still have that amp, still with its original Vox-labeled Mullard EL84 output tubes, and it still works.
 

David Barnett

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Yeah? Let me at it. j/k

I guess the point I forgot to make was that the potential for damage was self-limiting, since the frequency got too high to hear before the amp got to destructo levels.

And I suppose the frequency probably exceeded the speaker's top end range before it hit the top end of my young ears.
 

Nogoodnamesleft

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If you haven't seen this documentary, I think you would like it. It starts off with teenagers adapting technical drawings from Popular Mechanics to create drum pads and primitive keyboard devices in the 60s. Much Kratwerk, Gary Numan, and The Human League to be had.



It also reminded me of the existence of the song "Warm Leatherette" which I used to dance to like a maniac in the 80s.


Synth Britannia is a great documentary. Some legendary stuff in there and how it parallels the punk movement.

Another good one is I Dream of Wires.
 
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radiocaster

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Wow, you're really old! So I guess you must have played that thing in NYC in the 1910s or whenever that was.
 




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