I like this. Many don't.

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Larry F, Apr 5, 2015.

  1. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,261
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    I don't actually use the internet much, considering how much time I spend here everyday. But I just move around between a few types of things most of the time. This is my excuse for not knowing who this fellow is:


    The name is Brown. Pebber Brown. I gather that he has a good business making instructional videos and giving online lessons.

    Anyway, I get a kick out of the first 5-10 minutes of this.
     
  2. rave

    rave Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    517
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Larry

    Pebber is out here in souther california. He has tons of lessons and resources on his site. Some people find him abrasive but there are a couple of lessons on his site I really like. He is also legendary for having taught Buckethead how to play. I am away from my computer but there is a lesson he calls cheap jazz tricks which is actually a great lesson on adding notes to the pentatonic scale and moving it up a whole step and up a fifth that is cool.
     
  3. LeftyAl

    LeftyAl Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,278
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    Fl.
    I am a member of his guitar forum. Like you say, many people will not like his style of teaching.I feel that if he knows more than me(And he does) I can learn something from him.(and I have).
     
  4. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    12,441
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    Location:
    Annapolis, MD
    Good exercises.
     
  5. Space Pickle

    Space Pickle Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    393
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    OUTER SPACE
    Don't like his attitude or his "system".
     
  6. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,559
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    NELA, Ca
    I like Pebber.
    He says a lot of $h1t folks don't want to hear.
    He talks to you (the student) as if you want to be a 'professional musician'. Even the one's that want to be - most won't (99.5% won't). The truth is, most won't do the work.

    Do you have to do it exactly his way?
    Of course not but unless you're Cole Porter, Albert King, Mozart, Stevie Wonder or Paul McCartney, etc. ... you're gonna have to practice like a mother trucker and get some type of 'method' or you will fail.

    Pebber's talking about time. About your meter. When I go out to see 'local' music one of things that I notice the most is that soloist's - whether it be guitar, piano, sax or whatever - their time, their sense of meter and groove just sucks. And I'm talking any style. Same thing with the students I coach at the perf arts high school. So many of them know a lot of 'stuff' but have no sense of time. *And there are exceptions - which is awesome.
    I notice it with lead singers and rhythm guitar players too. Something just doesn't feel good.

    It's all about tone and time. If you have that, everything else is superfluous.
     
  7. Surf n Music

    Surf n Music TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    50
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2015
    Location:
    Santa cruz
    I never heard of him but I like him. Practice or you will suck! Love it. How is my kid doing? He needs a lot of work hahaha good stuff.
     
  8. rokdog49

    rokdog49 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,358
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Location:
    Ohio
     
  9. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    9,454
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    Plundertown (Gasville) OR
    I turned on the "Daily Practice Module 1" video. My kids came through and said, "What the heck are you listening to?" and I said, "I'm taking guitar lessons." They said, "You suck." Funny, that's what Pebber said.




    I like his videos, saved one in my "lessons" file. Thanks for steering me to him, Larry.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2015
  10. Erik8

    Erik8 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    190
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Is it a good idea to learn his scale systems?
     
  11. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,109
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    Amazing that after all these years on YT vids for lessons, I have never seen this guy or maybe I discounted him too fast. If it wasn't for the above accolades I would not have made it past the first 30 seconds. Nevertheless, I don't have the time for so much talk or maybe it is his way of delivery or maybe my patience. I made it to 3:22 (and it was difficult to put up with even that long) ... and I have lots of patience (I thought). I seem to have developed a similar practice regimen as him, but I guess I'll never really know. I'm glad he connects to some out there.
     
  12. the embezzler

    the embezzler Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    821
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Yep. We tend to forget about this when we focus on things like modes, exotic scales and speed. Look at Stevie Ray Vaughan - dude used basically two scales for his entire career but his tone, feel and time were on point. Ditto Angus Young.

    Guitarists (as a rule) tend to either rush or sit right on top of the beat. I include myself in that observation. There's a story about Emily Remler at Berklee being really depressed because her instructor observed how she rushed her time so she went away and worked with the metronome on 2 and 4 'til she fixed it.
    To me one of the things that makes Scofield Sco' is the way he sits waaaaayyyyyyyyyy back on the beat at times.
     
  13. Danjg

    Danjg Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    110
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Location:
    Omaha
    he certainly isn't going to sugar coat it
     
  14. rave

    rave Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    517
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    This was the lesson i was referring to. Short and very useable. I too have a hard time watching an hour plus video, but this was one immediately useful.

     
  15. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    32,859
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Lubbock, TX
    Thanks for this thread, Larry. I see something here that makes me want to take some lessons from Mr. Pepper. rave, thanks for that video there....I heard the 'jazz' thing in rick Derringer's playing at times, and Pepper reveals that trick.
     
  16. rave

    rave Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    517
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I like Derringer's playing, I will have to see if I can hear this trick. Any examples that you have?
     
  17. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    32,859
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Lubbock, TX
    rave, I heard it at that concert more than I have heard it anywhere else..Derringer's work with Cindy Lauper exposes some of his techniques, too. The Parish concert did with Lauper lets one hear something besides his 'rock and roll hootchie coo' approach....which is nothing to laugh about for straight ahead rock, right? I just heard the Johnny Winter cut with Derringer while driving down the hgihway. First song I learned by Derringer??? "Hang On, Sloopy" with The McCoys.....so there...I am dating myself. Long time ago....50 years??? There is no jazz influence in that one!! lOL....
     
  18. hotpot

    hotpot Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,309
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Location:
    Lancashire UK
    Thanks for the link, I hadn't heard of him before. Very good dexterity practice. I like him:)
     
  19. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    464
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    Location:
    Virginia
    Things like this really make me question what I can practice and how long. I honestly don't have the kind of time he talks about for practicing... 12 - 18 minutes alone just warming up the right hand plucking a single string!

    With a job, kids, volunteer responsibilities... I feel lucky to get 30 -60 minutes practice time in. Sometimes I even miss a day for practice ... then there is the time to prepare for playing out (which is not the same as practicing new things) which eats into that 30 - 60 minutes as well.

    Maybe when the kids are grown and I am up there in years I will have that time, but not now. I wonder what a guy like this would recommend for someone who knows they do not have the time to ever exceed intermediate status... what do you practice when every minute counts?

    Right now...
    I pick a song I am getting ready to play
    practice its chords
    practice the scales for that song
    make adjustments to the arrangement the song
    practice the song
    improv over the song

    That is it... all the time I have. No time for r-hand studies, l-hand studies, learning others licks or grooves, abstract theory... I have piles of things I want to dive into... but no time.
     
  20. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,261
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    Pualee and others: all we can do is make an honest attempt at improving, using what we hear others say that works, as well as using what we know works for us.

    In terms of what we might think of as advanced practice techniques, I think it is completely valid (as if you need my permission) to tackle some weirdo thing just for the pure entertainment value of learning what you seem to enjoy more and which seems to give your hands, ears, heart, and brain something enjoyable to try out, even if only for the experience.

    Here's one: learn to recite this:

    C E G F A C Bb D F Eb G Bb....

    This would be the notes of the major chords spelled out in the circle of 4ths/5ths. Can you do it in 30 seconds? It's easy to do, if you just decide to try it. Once you can do this, it is not nearly as difficult to go the other direction in the circle of 4ths/5ths:

    C E G G B D D F# A A C# E...

    Now that you have made it this far, it's easy enough to do these with minor chords.

    Now what? How about dom 7th chords?:

    C E G Bb F A C Eb Bb D F Ab...

    Major seventh: C E G B F A C E Bb D F A...

    Minor seventh: C Eb G Bb F Ab C Eb Bb Db F Ab

    Here's another one: start on any random note and go up/down the circle of 4ths/5ths, stopping on the 7th note. If I start on D and go up in 4ths, I get: D G C F Bb Eb Ab. Now, let's re-order these alphabetically, starting on Eb: Eb F G Ab Bb C D. Look, it is the Eb major scale.

    Let's make up a rule for our students. To generate a major scale a major scale, write down 7 notes from the circle of 4ths or 5ths, ascending or descending. Here I go:

    A E B F# C# G# D#

    Alphabetize them starting from the second note as the tonic or the second to the last note as the tonic. (You will need to make up a rule for deciding which note is the tonic.)

    Here is the correct ordering: E F# G# A B C# D#. How did I know to start on E and not C#? That's for me to know and you to find out.

    That's it for now. To learn this stuff, start with the first task I gave above and learn it well. When you're ready, go on to the second task, etc.

    All this takes is repetition. It's fun. Get a stopwatch and keep a log of your timings. Note: if you can afford it, get a real stopwatch, the analog kind. It looks cool, sounds cooler, and brings with it all kinds of positive associations. Be a nerd. Make it a game.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.