I just witnessed a real life "get-off-my-lawn" moment

Killing Floor

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Giving the neighbor the benefit of the doubt here, I feel a little sorry for anyone who’s so stupid they move next to a bar that has live music and after they’ve lived there a while they find out they moved next to a bar that has live music. How were they to know the bar next door with live music was a bar, let alone that the marquee with the live music schedule would indicate when the bands will play? Someone should have told him.

It’s the same reason I have never felt pity when someone is struck by a train. Some things don’t sneak up on you.
 

Peegoo

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I know some of these people personally and I have zero sympathy for them.

I'm with you 100%. It's like buying a house next to a train track and then complaining about noise at 2 a.m.

I live in a suburban area that first saw rapid development in the mid-80s. Prior to that, the area was all agro farmland. One of the land owners build a dragstrip (Capitol Raceway) where they run national-level competitions. It was a good place for a race track: out in the country. The only thing it annoyed was the tobacco fields and corn crops.

As suburbia began to encroach on the area, neighborhoods sprang up and next thing ya know--there's a drag strip in a bunch of back yards.

They race every Friday and Saturday in the spring, summer, and fall. Locals have tried to change the laws; they've run petitions and collected signatures to back up the argument that the drag strip needs to disappear.

The owner of the drag strip has been far more understanding than I would ever be: he's installed walls and tree lines to help break up the sound of the roaring bikes and cars, and he's cut back on hours of operation. He's trying very hard to be a good neighbor.

But the local goobers persist.

 

Nogoodnamesleft

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I’m going to suggest that choosing to live in an area close to public establishments or commercial trade in general probably isn’t the wisest choice if quiet nights are your desire. Perhaps he should think about a sleepy suburb or the countryside.
 

ChicknPickn

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It would suck living close to a music venue. In our area, a "lights out" ordinance kicks in at 11 p.m., and decibels at certain distances are measured. I know the lights out policy is followed. I can't confirm the decibel check, though people say it's real.
 

Killing Floor

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I'm with you 100%. It's like buying a house next to a train track and then complaining about noise at 2 a.m.

I live in a suburban area that first saw rapid development in the mid-80s. Prior to that, the area was all agro farmland. One of the land owners build a dragstrip (Capitol Raceway) where they run national-level competitions. It was a good place for a race track: out in the country. The only thing it annoyed was the tobacco fields and corn crops.

As suburbia began to encroach on the area, neighborhoods sprang up and next thing ya know--there's a drag strip in a bunch of back yards.

They race every Friday and Saturday in the spring, summer, and fall. Locals have tried to change the laws; they've run petitions and collected signatures to back up the argument that the drag strip needs to disappear.

The owner of the drag strip has been far more understanding than I would ever be: he's installed walls and tree lines to help break up the sound of the roaring bikes and cars, and he's cut back on hours of operation. He's trying very hard to be a good neighbor.

But the local goobers persist.


Where I live there’s always someone moving into a house in one of the entertainment districts and complain the city council constantly. @ wholes
 

Jakedog

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Where I live there’s always someone moving into a house in one of the entertainment districts and complain the city council constantly. @ wholes
Yeah. Ever has it been. Folks all want to move to Austin for all the great music, fun, food and drink, nightlife, etc. Then they act surprised to find out that to live IN a town like that, you have to live WITH that stuff.
 

ravindave_3600

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I was playing a community event that started at 9am and we were the first band. About 9:20 this guy comes over and politely asks if we could turn it down. "Well... sorry... I mean, we're supposed to be playing."

He then asked if we could just turn down the bass; that's mostly what was bothering him and he works nights so.... It then occurred to us there weren't any houses nearby. "Where did you come from?" Dude points to an apartment house 4 blocks away. 4 blocks. So yes, we talked to the sound guy about it.

But moving in next door to a punk bar I think you get what you paid for.
 

tonfarbe

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But moving in next door to a punk bar I think you get what you paid for.
Maybe, just maybe, the guy used to live there long before a club/bar opened next to him.
Happens all the time here in Berlin.

And didn't the club owner know about this guy?
If the guy is a notorious grumbler, the conflict should flare up at every concert and noone should be surprised.
 
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maxvintage

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When that’s no fun anymore, one doesn’t have the right to simply ruin it for everyone else. It’s time to move.
Maybe it's time to move, or maybe all neighborhoods change and evolve. There's absolutely no reason a person should be required to behave the same at all ages and stage of their life: a person who still acted like he was eighteen when he was 40 would be ridiculous. You move to a place, you make it your home, and very often there are generational changes.

And who has more "claim" on a neighborhood--a person who lives there, owns property there, maybe is involved in local governance issues, or a person who blows in to get drunk and then leaves?

We live in a semi-urban neighborhood have a nice beer garden near us that has live music. My wife and I like it--I've played gigs there--but some of the neighbors really hate it, like in-a-rage hate it. There was lots of beefing, the city got involved, as they should, and they reached a compromise, limited hours for music and a limited decibel range. We can still hear it from our house, which we like, but the people who hate it know it will end by ten and it's not going to be really loud. Nobody gets exactly what they want, but the business is thriving.
 

brookdalebill

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I promised myself I wouldn’t become a curmudgeon who only complains when I got, uh, as old as am now.
When I was young (under 30), it seemed like old people (over 50) were constantly bitchin’ about their ailments, and everyone else in their life.
Music was too loud, or too fast, or too something.
So, now that I’m, older, more tired, and less energetic than ever, I intend to keep that promise.
Y’all bust me if i don’t.
Really.
Who wants to be “that (old) guy”?
 

MickM

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A steel guitar engagment.
It's a bar in the city of Heerlen's centre.
Bluff-voorkant-nieuw-HMS-Kathsphotography-3278.jpg


View attachment 976520
I'm the one flashing the double horns with the Strat on my shirt.
View attachment 976523
Dog Eat Dog at the Cafe Bluff, again, I'm actually in that picture, I'm the guy with the heavy horn rim glasses. The guy on the far right is my kid brother.
I don't normally use the term "sausage party" but where are the girl punkers?
 




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