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I guess I've moved on.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Toto'sDad, Sep 29, 2020.

  1. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Afflicted

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    We have a plethora of garden spiders (Argiope diadematus) at our barn. They are beautiful creatures. We enjoy having them.
     
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  2. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My wife is the arch enemy of spiders. I'm pretty sure she is that evil woman in their society. She kills with glee, she's been at it every since we married. Black widows are her specialty.
     
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  3. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    I hear you TD.
    I hit 72 this year, and along with Covid, it has caused to look at things a little differently.
    Perhaps rearrange some priorities.
    I frequently chalk it up to, "I only have so many F***s to give, and I'm not going to give one for that! (Whatever it is)".
     
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  4. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    My dad was military, so I learned to shoot on a range on base when I was six. I passed on the love of shooting as a sport and the corresponding respect for fire discipline to my sons. My oldest is an amazing shot. I can't think of a competition he's participated in over the last 7 years that he hasn't won. He's actually been approached by several law enforcement and military folks trying to recruit him because of his particular shooting abilities.

    I've always seen hunting for food as one thing and hunting for sport as quite another. My life-long held belief is that it is only a fair hunt for sport if the target is equally armed. Remember the scene in Crocodile Dundee where the bad guys are taking shots trying to hit Mick, but then see a kangaroo armed with a rifle which is being pointed at them?
     
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  5. bcorig

    bcorig Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Man has been hunting a long time.
     
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  6. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    If I were near starving or my life was threatened I would kill what was necessary to save me or my kin. Other than that, I have no interest in killing anything.
     
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  7. Mechanic

    Mechanic Friend of Leo's

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    I wouldn’t know what to do with Bambi if I tried. Never had an interest in hunting. That being said I do love a round of skeet when I have the opportunity. I’m no stranger to a pistol range and do a little smithing on 1911s.
    Like a lot here I’ve no interest in taking a life unless I need to feed myself. And I would be struggling to do it.
     
  8. big jimmy

    big jimmy Tele-Afflicted

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    Nothing wrong with hunting as long as your ethical about it. Most likely better for the environment than a cow.
    I was a big hunter of everything that flew, quail,pheasants, duck , geese, grouse, woodcock. Mostly it was training dogs that I enjoyed and putting them to work. Never had a dog that didn't want to go hunt. When the last one died and the kids were taking up to much time to train another I lost the desire I guess.
    I miss the dogs more than I miss hunting.
     
  9. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    This thread makes me sad, and kind of disorients me.

    My eyesight was bad, as a kid, and my Dad had to take my bow and arrow away from me after a few close calls. I had no business around firearms, obviously.

    I think there's way too much "habitat" in the USA that's not being hunted, and I think this is a terrible shame. I think if we developed land a different way, and encouraged hunting as before, we wouldn't be seeing all these terrible Tick related diseases. Hired hunters can help, but some parcels are just the wrong size and I'm not sure what besides contraception is gonna help.

    My neighbors have been trying to teach me to hunt, but it appears the Lasik surgery just came along too late in life and just as my Grandfather was a lousy driver (starting at age 60) I'm a very poor candidate - and it sure doesn't help that I don't even eat red meat.

    But somebody has got to get out there and make it happen. I hope some of you will reconsider, and take some new recruits out there and teach them what you know. We've created a sort of ecosystem that depends on aggressive hunting by our citizenry.
     
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  10. scrapyardblue

    scrapyardblue Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I own several pistols, but I don't hunt because I haven't found any game that I like to eat. I ain't shooting any cows, pigs or chickens.

    Not trying to be a wise guy, but why kill a fox or a bobcat? They bothering the livestock?
     
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  11. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Friend of Leo's

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    Pelts. When I was in high school we used to get $10 for a fox. You could make $200-$300 a week trapping fox and raccoons.
     
  12. NightOwl

    NightOwl Tele-Meister

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    I don't hunt anymore really. I still enjoy poking holes in things from a long way off. Paper targets are way easier to get into the truck than a deer. After Uncle Sam taught me some certain things, chasing critters isn't much fun anymore. I could certainly go for a three month camping trip though. I love the woods.
     
  13. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm pretty sure there's been a reverse corelation found between ticks, Lyme's disease and small carnivores...in particular foxes.
    Ticks mainly get their first meal from a mouse, shrew or other small rodent.
    Foxes and the like mainly feed on small rodents and keep their numbers down.
    People killing foxes and carnivores for sport or because...somehow...they consider them 'vermin' are only helping the rodents...and the ticks.
     
  14. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    I've had a (very) smallholding over here and I've personally raised and killed animals for food. Chickens, ducks, rabbits, goats...a pig once. I can do it.
    But pleasure or 'sport' is never a part of it.

    If I do have a built-in hunting instinct I'll fulfill it bird-watching. I don't have to kill.
    I don't accept tradition or instinct as an excuse for killing/cruelty for pleasure.

    We men have also got a built-in instinct to impregnate as many young women as possible.
    We don't have to do that either...
     
  15. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    Trivia.

    Concerning us males and our hunting 'instincts'...
    It seems that we men are programmed to 'search' for things at a distance, whereas women tend to look closer. Countless generations of us hunting and observing the distance and for them...women...concentrating on the near surroundings (including who in the tribe is getting along with whom) was more important.

    Roll on today and when us guys try to find our socks in the wardrobe, or ground ginger on a supermarket shelf, we can't find it until a female says, exasperated, 'it's right THERE...'.

    We should have mens' supermarkets with items spaced far apart and way back....even camoflauged up on the walls to be found with binoculars.
    Finding the ground ginger would be easier and much more fun.
    They could even have things move around and 'hide'...and we'd have to hit the barcode with a laser or something.
     
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  16. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    My father was a fully trained butcher but, a gentle soul, and had to " cut and dress" all the produce. he gave it away to dig ditches for telephone lines, then a linesman, technician, eventually managing 1/4 of this city. He couldn't live with killing animals. Only did it before going to war ( 1943) to provide the family with food. He kept 2/6d. for himself.
    Loved fishing but we ( now my sons) only keep legal size fish and fish we will eat that night.
    Gotta leave the little ones to grow and our children's children to eat.
     
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  17. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    It seems like we all hit a certain age where those things that once brought us much joy are no longer enjoyable, possible, or even worth pursuing.

    I have had to ponder this very notion recently, as I have chosen to wean-down on my beer drinking over the past few months and weeks, and, as of this very day, to give up drinking alcohol altogether.

    Drinking as a form of relaxation, and culturally, a time-honored pastime of this curious community of military aviators; it's not something to be left behind on a whimsy or a capricious quick-decision.

    Rather, it's a choice to turn a corner.
    And we all, whether we realize it or not, turn certain corners at different points in our lives.

    How many young men turn around one day and realize that they are getting too old to go skateboarding with their buddies, most of whom have gone off to college?

    In my late 30's, it was time to stop chasing strange tail, and to settle down. I did settle down, and married my best friend in the world.

    Early 40's, I retired from the active Army, and gave up traveling the world in search of new ways to get myself killed.

    Mid-40's, I had to give up distance running (indeed, running altogether) because my knees and hip joints won't put up with it any longer. I took up lap swimming for my cardio, and I have never looked back.

    Somewhere in there I stopped riding fast street motorcycles, and shifted over to slower, more nimble street/trail enduro bikes.

    By age 50, it was time to give up hard liquor. I just liked it too much, and it wasn't serving me well, in any fashion. I shifted over to dark beers, and then eventually light beer.

    A few years later, television was gone from my life. And movies, and all forms of corporate entertainment. I fully embraced being a writer and song writer, and became a producer rather than a consumer of creative endeavors.

    And so now, at age 61, I'm turning that corner and choosing to live the rest of my days without any form of alcohol. Men in my family don't have a history of living all that long, and I figure that I might eek out just a few more years on this earth if I can manage to keep my original liver in some sort of working order.

    Toto's Dad, I admire and respect you, sir.
    I can only imagine how tragic was the loss of your oldest son and hunting buddy.
    And I understand completely how the thrill and joy of the hunt is gone, and how sad it is to realize that you have turned that particular corner in your life.

    Many is the elder seaman who stands out on the end of the dock, and looks out onto the watery horizon, and scans for that vessel that sails out past the horizon without him aboard.

    And when the sun finally settles down into the sea, there's a brief green flash that blesses him, and wishes him a good but vaguely uneasy night's rest.

    :(




    bonaire-green-flash.jpg
     
  18. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There was once a considerable market for bobcat hides. They have to be skinned a certain way. You can't slice them down the front, they have to be sliced at the bottom of the body between the hind legs, then the skin taken off all the way to the tip of their nose. It's painstaking work to get all the meat off the hide. Fox hides weren't worth as much, but they were plentiful. Something happened to the market for them, I don't think it exists now.
     
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  19. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Your story is of a life well lived, but as you say, the changes come to us, whether we're ready for them or not. Thank you for you kind words about me and my son. He was born to me at an early age, and for years we could pass for older and younger brothers when he grew up. We were father and son, brothers, and best friends. The world can never be the same for me, I realize that now. I have much to be thankful for yet, my lovely wife, younger son, and daughter. Still, we must journey on until that brief flash of green of light!
     
  20. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You're 1955's cousin aren't you? :D:lol::lol:
     
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