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I didn't know Stratocasters could be pretty

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by nobis17, Sep 10, 2020.

  1. RhinestoneStrat

    RhinestoneStrat Tele-Meister

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    My 2002 (20th anniversary) Squier Standard Strat sure is a beauty!:)

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  2. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    EVERYTHING

    Is the ugliest guitar ever, shape is wrong, the ergonomic is wrong, headstock is ugly, pickups are inane, position 2 and 4 are the WORST sound EVER. Is just a wrong wood body full of hole covered with ugly plastic. Jack plate is in the wrong shape and the wrong place, pots wiring is wrong, vol pot is the worst place to be, tremolo is wrong too, please, those springs covered with a plastic cover...

    Is justb a try of Fender to make a cheap guitar and that it looks and sound... Albeit some good players can make musis with a cheap guitar and any other guitar too, of course. Is not the arrow, is the indian...
     
  3. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Friend of Leo's

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    I see what happened. Epiphany. Been there. For the first 40 years of my life, I never even took notice of telecasters. One day in Amsterdam I saw one in the window of a shop. Hooked for life. You can't resist it. All you have to ask yourself is "what Strat do I want". That's the ONLY decision you have to make. Me, I'd go for something like this…

    57_Blonde_Stratocaster_9187-1000.jpg

    … or this

    63 65 and 62 OLY white strats.jpg

    BTW, strats are wonderful and a total must have in any guitarist's stable. Just sayin'…
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2020
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  4. esseff

    esseff Tele-Afflicted

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    I read somewhere waaaay back in a guitar magazine that the Fender logo reverse 'F' was inspired by the sensuous curve of a woman's back as she bent over. I can see the connection. Anyone else heard that?

    Ugliest guitar ever? How much more offensive to the eye can these be! :eek:

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  5. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Friend of Leo's

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    Hmm… it sounds pretty spurious. You can see early versions of Fender's spaghetti logo all over their early ADs and commercial literature and
    - it's a rather home-made affair, with a lot of variation, and in many instances there is an angle in the F
    - it's a rather straightforward derivation from the way you handwrite an "F"
    - at the time the logo appeared, the company was a small business centered around Leo himself and few collaborators. The main customer base were down-to-earth local musicians, and the idea you get from reading about Leo is pretty incompatible with risqué associations of this sort…

    That said, if anyone got more on the origins of the spaghetti logo, I'm curious!
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2020
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  6. bluzkat

    bluzkat Tele-Holic

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    upload_2020-9-11_7-51-23.jpeg

    I like Strats... :D
     
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  7. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    with regard to those original two-color bursts, the yellow was indeed a color that was in the Fullerplast sealer coat. If wanted, I will post a picture of the body of that 1954 I refinished that shows the original fullerplast in the cavities.
     
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  8. Mistahbrock

    Mistahbrock TDPRI Member

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    Hello Nobis

    Perhaps it's the simplicity or minimalistic design of it.
    As a big time fender fan, I was always into the rosewood veneer necks, but over time the genuiosity of the maple neck has grown on my perception of the design.

    One piece of hard maple with the thin "skunk" stripe is exceptionally simple and beautiful in my view, just as the whole telecaster is a masterpiece in design, nothing can be added or subtracted, it's just timeless and classic.

    I think the Gibson Les Paul has the exact same qualities.

    Best regards, Brock
     
  9. EllroyJames

    EllroyJames Friend of Leo's

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    Pretty in pink

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  10. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Strats pretty? They're certainly not the "natural beauties" that Telecasters are but, but sure, they can be pretty. That is unless they're Antiqua's...:confused::rolleyes:
     
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  11. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Tele-Afflicted

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    Yikes man. That sounds pretty rough. I don't think I can change your mind though, so I'll just leave it at that ;)

    One thing we can agree on is the springs covered by the plastic cover. That's why I take my plastic cover off. Builds that I do don't even get holes drilled.
     
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  12. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    That is just as I said.

    However, it wasn’t Fullerplast in 1954.
     
  13. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    well, Esquire, that is not how I read your post....I quote again....
    “2. It was really just a one color burst, because the wood wasn't dyed. It was just a very dark brown ring around the perimeter of natural colored ash. The sealer coats imparted a little bit of yellow to the wood, but not a lot.”

    Fender used a color...yellow....whether or not the first Strats had the color in the Fullerplast is something which I cannot firmly debate, but if not then a nitrolacquer coat or two of yellow was sprayed after the pore filler. Those Starts did NOT have a natural colored ash burst. Fender put a two color burst on them, and that is what they used until they went to the three color burst with some red sprayed before the dark edge was applied.

    Also, just to keep things straight, Fender did not dye wood. They applied color coats. That is why one will see natural wood if and when the finish color coats are chipped off or worn away. Dyed wood does not give up the color that way because the dye is IN the wood as opposed to a color coat that is applied over a washcoat, pore filler for the ash, and sealer coat.
     
  14. bigbreak

    bigbreak Tele-Meister

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    A pretty '57 Strat from the 1962 movie Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation. Looks like it already has wear on the neck. I think Herb Alpert and Doris Packer like it. Mr+Hobbs+Herb.jpg
     
  15. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    I was saying that the center color of the early bursts was not deliberately colored. I mistakenly said it was through '56, but of course it was not. My post was speaking generally of the up-to-'56 Strat specs, and I lumped everything together. The middle color of the very early burst came from the inherent warm coloring of the Homoclad (not Fullerplast) sealer used as their go-to sealer prior to 1963. The earliest Strats were finished this way, perhaps the first 100 or so. You are not talking about those, and you don’t appear to be aware of them. After that, yes, the center color was sprayed...until mid 1956. Both were nearly unique processes, not done again by Fender until decades later. My apologies for not making clear the difference between these two early styles of burst.

    Fender most certainly did dye wood. In addition to their necks, they dyed the alder used on bursts starting in mid 1956. They dipped the whole body in a vat of aniline dye, then sealed before bursting with the outer color. This continued through for a very long time, though starting in mid 1964, they started spraying the yellow again...but over the already dyed wood. The result being that the center yellow color became much more opaque.

    Dye does not penetrate all the way through a piece of wood. If you take a chunk out of the wood, or wear it down below the surface layers, no more dye!
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2020
  16. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Here is a 7/54 Strat with the guard off.

    This is once they has started spraying the yellow.

    However, look at the lower horn. Fender knew that would be covered with the guard, so they didn't bother spraying the yellow there. That is what the earliest burst Strats looked like all the way around. Pic pulled from the Internet.

    54_strat-july_8.jpg

    And here's what Gruhn calls the earliest known Strat. The lacquer itself has aged, but you can see that it was originally just a slightly warm ash, then the outer color. This is a perfect example of the early burst of which I am speaking. That is NOT yellow on the center color. It's a naturally aged amber clear coat.

    1954FenderStrat0100.jpg
     
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  17. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I stand corrected, it seems. My references say that Fullerplast was first used in 1961. I have never heard of Homoclad. Although I have never seen ab early Strat with the red that is in that 7/54 Strat. That looks like a three color burst fro: here???
    At any rate, here are a few pics of the 12/54 Strat I worked on. This is the oldest Strat I have had the privilege of working on. The owner refinished it in 1962. The neck was unplayable due to back now and a loose t-Rod, and it would not hold frets in the middle of the neck due to black rot....I saved it.
     

    Attached Files:

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  18. Mistahbrock

    Mistahbrock TDPRI Member

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    the lower one, the scarabee was created by Antonio Pioli - Wandrè, one of the most interresting guitar builders of all times.

    I can recommend digging into his creations and history, it's pure magic.

    His creation "Rock Oval" is a pure masterpiece.
     
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  19. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    It is rather hard to keep it all straight. From ‘54 to the ‘70s, there were at least nine kinds of standard Fender sunbursts that I’m aware of!

    1. Sealed and clear coated ash in the middle. Dark brown on the outside. Clear coated. On very early Strats – usually only the ones that have the the serial number punched into the vibrato cavity cover and 100K pots.

    2. Sealed ash, sprayed with translucent yellow in the middle. Dark brown on the outside. Clear coated. On Strats till about mid-‘56.

    3. Dyed and sealed alder in the middle. Dark brown on the outside. Clear coated. Mid-'56–some point in 1958.

    4. Dyed and sealed alder in the middle. Dark brown on the outside. Translucent red in between. Clear coated. Starting at some point in 1958.

    5. Dyed and sealed alder in the middle. Dark brown on the outside. Aniline tinted (“weak”) translucent red in between. Clear coated. These reds fade out to a variety of orangey-brown middle colors, or all the way to a two tone burst – kind of like how the reds in the famous Les Paul bursts have faded. Faded examples are what the term “tobacco sunburst” is talking about. ‘59–‘60.

    6. Dyed and sealed alder in the middle. Black (no longer dark brown) on the outside. Back to a more durable translucent red in between. The classic late-pre-CBS-era burst, which clearly shows the wood grain in the middle, retains its red very well, and has a black outer color (not brown). ‘61–mid-‘64. When most people think “3TSB,” this is what they’re thinking of.

    7. Dyed and sealed alder in the middle, oversprayed with translucent yellow. Black on the outside. Translucent red in the middle. You can’t see much wood grain (none at all on some), and the yellow center is very bright. The classic CBS burst, sometimes referred to as “target burst.” It’s generally viewed as Fender’s “ugly” burst, in the same way that Gibson’s infamous “clown burst” doesn't have that many fans. Mid-‘64–‘67.

    8. Target burst, but with urethane used for the clear coats. Started in 1968 with the switch to “poly.” However, the color coats remained lacquer.

    9. Back to more visible grain in the middle during the ‘70s. Not really sure why, because this is an era I don’t care much about. Perhaps they stopped dyeing the wood first...or maybe they kept dyeing it, and stopped spraying the translucent yellow on top of it. At any rate, it’s still a clear urethane shell over lacquer below.

    Fullerplast started being experimented with in the early ’60s, and was standard by ‘63.

    I have a mid-‘62 (original Custom Color) that does not have Fullerplast sealer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2020
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  20. Erdowonge

    Erdowonge Tele-Meister

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    Fender should stop making 21 fret necks though
     
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