I am gonna build a Tele

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by bamboofrog, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Clamps came off last night and it all looks good.

    I have a couple of questions. How would you recommend thicknessing the machine head without a bandsaw, I know this would be the best way, but what are my altenatives?

    cheers
     
  2. Casual_Reader

    Casual_Reader Tele-Holic

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  3. RnB

    RnB Tele-Meister

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    I guess you changed the pre-slotted Fretboard somewhere along the line from Maple to Rwd? What kind of Rwd is that? What a nice hunk of wood!

    Also, how did you keep the fretboard from slipping around on the neck come glue-up time?
     
  4. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Yeah I decided I wanted it a bit more of a contrast so rosewood it was. I don't actually know the type of Rwood, but it looks tasty so that's all that matters.

    As for the fretboard slipping I just glued lined up and clamped slowly, making small adjustments by hand an eye (scietific approach:D) as ncessary and then clamped tight.
     
  5. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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  6. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    That body turned out great, looks like it's a one piece with that grain.
     
  7. Schizotronic

    Schizotronic Tele-Meister

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    Beatiful job, frog. There is this guy, who has done something clever, and even better, you can use this "jig" during the whole process, for a bunch of things. Click on the pictures, they get bigger.

    http://home.asparagine.net/ant/blog/?p=111

    It's similar to the jig presented before, but the extra time on building this one is time well spent. :rolleyes:
     
  8. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Ok after advice and a bit of thought I constructed a very rough jig to help thickness the headstock.

    [​IMG]

    It went really well, its is a bit over 0.5", it is nearer 0.7". I have however removed a bit to much towards the nut and given myself a very steep curve down (more like a vertical drop ::)).

    [​IMG]

    More concerning is that it would seem that my truss rod is less secure than I previously thought. There is no rattle if you shake the neck but if you tap it then there is a very definite rattle.

    My next concern is that the neck is very thick overall, the maple is an inch thick and the fret board is about 1/4" I did not think of tis when glueing everything up. Is this likely to cause a problem or will it resolve itself on shaping the neck?

    I think I know how I will solve the first two issues, but would appreciate your thoughts:

    1. The steep incline - I plan on glueing a piece of left over rosewood at the base of the "cliff face" and blending this through to give a gentler curve

    2. Rattling truss rod - Now this may be back to front thinking, but my initial thought is to carefully rout from the rear of the neck (hopefully without destroying the rod), re-fix the rod and insert a walnut fillet as a one piece neck would be. That sounds easier than trying to get the very well glued fret board off.

    Any help is as always very much appreciated.
     
  9. Schizotronic

    Schizotronic Tele-Meister

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    I had a guitar with its rod rattling inside, it sucks.

    I believe that by scraping, rasping and sanding the neck you can shape it to match the thickness you want. There's nothing to be scared of though.

    I've seen some guitars exaclty like you said. With a "blending piece". I don't see a problem doing that. In fact, the nut walls will help you to hide the joint.

    Gee, this is huge. Are you really sure this rod was well installed? I mean, you said a lot about the channel but remember carefully, do you have any possible culprit? Remember all the steps you did. And tap the back and the fretboard: where is the noise comingo from? Even with the rod tighetened (only snug) lightly, can you hear the sound?
    I know it's frustrating, time-consuming and even very sad but if you absolutelly need to check the channel, remove the fretboar. Use a hot gun, or even a soldering iron with cloth underneath. And LOTS of patience. Expect to spend 3-4 hours. You look very skilled, I'm sure you can remove it with absolutelly no wood chips left over. :cry:
    BUT back to the old days, here in Brazil we had only Siminoffs old book. And the guys here at a locar factory (Gianinni) they used to fill completelly the truss-rod channel with glue; that's it. GLUE. A PVC based one, I think there in the US you have a "white" Titebond that is somehow more "plastic" and more "elastic", besides being weaker. With these characteristics, I believe the glue "moves" with the rod: I mean, you can tight the rod and loose it, letting the neck go to an upbow (the glue is malleable even whe dry - it's like regular school glue for kids). So, you can pour some glue through the "channel hole" and let it dry for a day and a half (here in Brazil it's hot so a day is enough - don't know your region's weather). This solution sounds cheesy for me, but at least you don't need to rout out the back of the neck and put the strip or remove the perfectly and recently glued fingerboard.
    I don't know, I'm just thinking loud... You can put your neck vertically an let the glue run through some space next to the visible part of the rod. And the guys at this factory I'm talking about did this as part of production routine. They saturate the channel completelly, install the rod, spread more glue onto the surface and clamp the board and the neck.
    Filling the channel like this might work.

    Or you can tell: "man, what is this guy saying?" - I know how terrible it is when we do something and we need to "undo" right after.;)

    Any help is as always very much appreciated.[/QUOTE]
     
  10. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Cheers for the advice and support, I am not sure what I am going to do yet, just thoughts and ideas at the moment. I will give the truss rod a bit of tweak first to see if this resolves things.

    ah dear, it was all going so well, still every mistake is an opportunity to learn.
     
  11. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    A bit more work

    The rattle got on my nerves so I decided to sort it out, quite pleased with how it turned out.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I then decided to rout the neck pocket and control cavity.

    [​IMG]

    As you can probably tell I had a bit of an accident on the control cavity, the plunge lock on the router slipped and the router bit cut into the template and subsequently the body.

    Fortunately the control plate covers up my mistake
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Schizotronic

    Schizotronic Tele-Meister

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    Don't worry, as you said, you are "saved by the plate". That happens or happened to all of us.
    But, God, you routed the back of the neck :cry:

    At least, could you spot the guilty?:twisted:

    Don't be nervous. Go get a tea, watch some TV and let the projet aside for a while...

    Your work seems superb so far.
     
  13. Leigh

    Leigh Tele-Meister

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    Glad you got that rattle sorted. Great work, it's going to look a lovely tele
     
  14. Celticophilia

    Celticophilia TDPRI Member

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    Great job on the project! I love the grain pattern on the body, and I love the way you "matched" the two pieces!

    One question: Is there any advantage to a two piece body, or is it hard finding a suitable Ash plank large enough for a one piece?

    Can't wait to see how she turns out! Good Luck!
     
  15. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Cheers. I don't believe their are any advantages except certain woods are easier and cheaper to find as two piece.
     
  16. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Not too much work today. I ran a round over bit along the top edge of the body and routed the bridge pickup.
    [​IMG]

    Drilled the holes for the string ferrules, not bad but I can definitely see what an advantage a drill press would be.
    [​IMG]

    Drilled the jack socket made a little mess, a few chips around the opening, so recessed it slightly.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. RnB

    RnB Tele-Meister

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    Are you going to use the Ferrules that are lipped or the type that sink into the body, so there's no lip on the body surface?

    If you are using the sunken type (3/8" wide), you can bevel the edges slightly & get rid of most of those chipped edges.

    I little tidbit I learned from J Wells was to use a grinding stone on the edges of the Ferrule holes, to chamfer the edges ever so slightly. It gives it a clean look.

    [​IMG]

    However, if you are using the lipped-type, this would not apply.

    If the holes are now 5/16", you could also bore them out to the 3/8" size, then use the type of Ferrules shown in the Pic above & below...

    I'd use a regular 3/8" drill bit:
    1. By twisting it in the ferrule hole in reverse carefully, so you don't get any more chip-out. Practice on scrap first!
    2. When you get it enlarged, use the forward speed on your drill to open the hole enough, so it will be ready for a 3/8" Forstner bit.
    3. A 3/8" Forstner bit can now be used to complete the bore to the right depth, which would be a tad more than 3/8".
    Nickel String Ferrules

    In the end, they should look like this (recessed):
    [​IMG]
     
  18. irishtele

    irishtele Tele-Meister

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    Are you usig the stewmac 2 way adjustable truss rod? It looks similar to it. Would you reccomend it? Is the channel and skunk stripe flat or are the curved? I will soon be building a neck similar to yours so I am looking for all the info I can get! :D
     
  19. bamboofrog

    bamboofrog TDPRI Member

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    Hi irishtele

    The truss rod is a double action from wdmusic, it is a bit thinner than the stewmac ones. The skunk stripe was flat, I think you would only use a curved stripe when using a traditional curved truss rod.

    I actually ended up ruining this neck, too much haste and not enough forethought. Ah well, I will be trying again soon.
     
  20. teleblues001

    teleblues001 Tele-Meister

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    I have to hand it to you bamboofrog, for your first build, you've been doing a pretty good job on it. And that grain match you did on the two pieces was really excellent. AS for the few issues you've run into....like you said, it all becomes a learning experience for the next time. I'm sure once you get the rest of it built and plug it in for the first time, those issues will fade into past memory paled by the sense of accomplishment you will have. I look forward to seeing your finished Tele.
     
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