Hypothetical question...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Jakedog, Jun 6, 2020.

  1. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    That isn’t actually hypothetical... about a guitar repair...

    Say one we’re to buy a used guitar. It feels perfect. It sounds perfect. It’s an incredibly rare color that you never see, is almost impossible to find, and you really like it. It’s already had upgrades done, and you actually like them! It’s what you would have done yourself.

    Everything about this guitar is the bees knees. But...

    The previous owner installed an LSR roller nut. And they didn’t cut the slot right. So the intonation on all your first position chords is crap. You didn’t notice what the issue was until you went to change the strings and tweak the setup when you got home...

    I have zero desire to return this guitar. I do not want to give it up. How hard is this to fix? Can the slot be suitably filled and recut? Even for a traditional nut? Or is this a case of I’m better off buying a new neck?

    I’m keeping it either way. Just want to know if somebody more skilled than I am could salvage this neck cost effectively.
     
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  2. shupe13

    shupe13 Tele-Holic

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    Anything can be done.

    Take it to a luthier. I can't see it obviously but it shouldn't be too difficult or expensive.

    Sent from my REVVLPLUS C3701A using Tapatalk
     
  3. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    You could have rosewood/maple spliced in and a new nut installed or move the LSR to the appropriate position

    As above anything can be done it just depends how much money you want to throw at it

    I have enough faith in myself to try fixing it myself and I’m only kind of skilled, so for someone who does that kind of work all the time it should be an easy fix

    I’d try to salvage it if I really like said neck
     
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  4. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Okay, the below video is how they are mounted, so if the top of the nut slot is original, then you have something to reference from. Check the neck alignment with the body first, because this is where a lot of these issues originate. Anyhow, my .02
    Good luck.
     
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  5. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think like the above posters, it can be done, and from what I’ve read you can do it. Since already open to replacing the neck, you have nothing to lose by trying to do the repair yourself.
    If you post some pics, then perhaps a plan of attack could be formulated and eventually executed.
    Sounds like this guitar is just what you’ve always wanted, for that reason alone it should be repaired, you can’t just get rid of the love of your life, and you can’t live with the defect, that only leaves one option, fix it.
     
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  6. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It’s the weirdest thing. All fretted notes are fine. It’s when you play a fretted note against an open string, or play chords that contain open strings, it’s noticeably wrong. That’s why I’m sure the nut is in the wrong spot. It looks 100% fine to the naked eye. But it ain’t.
     
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  7. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Have you check it on a digital tuner? Like tuning it to an open string, then move up the fretboard and see how each fretted note registers?
     
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  8. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I know you know your stuff, but how good is the intonation at the 12th fret?
     
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  9. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I just reread your first post and my question seems redundant. Here’s an explanation.
     
  10. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Figured it out. Whomever installed this nut, installed it too far forward. I got out a caliper and measured it. The installer positioned it so that the very back edge of the nut, is where the back edge of a nut would normally be. But unlike a regular nut, that’s not where the strings make contact. They make contact on the ball bearings. So the first fret is 2/32” too long.

    All fretted notes are fine. All open strings are flat. Because the distance from the nut’s contact point to the first fret is too long. This is gonna be a pain in the ass.
     
  11. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you tune to an open High E then start up the fretboard to F then to F# then G then G# to A.
    Are the noteS as you move up getting closer to being off key or are they each solidly zero cents + or - .
    Example, Open E zero cents +or - tuned open.
    F increases # by 10 cents. F# is 20 cents sharp, G is 30 cents sharp?


    OK, looks like you have found the problem.
    What your ideas on how to fix it?
     
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  12. TommyBaltimore

    TommyBaltimore TDPRI Member

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    It is fixable. I talked to my luthier about changing from an LSR to regular. It would be a visible fix. Removing more wood to glue in a new piece and cutting a new nut slot.
     
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  13. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The only “correct” way to fix it will be to fill that slot with a good piece of maple, and recut the nut slot in the correct position. I’m not doing it. I’m gonna have somebody who’s better at this stuff than I am redo it. I’m also gonna see if I can talk GC into paying for it. Since they took it in this way, and sold it to me.

    Im not thinking I’ll be successful at getting the money out of them. But it’s worth a shot.
     
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  14. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yeah. That’s what is gonna have to happen. Luckily I don’t really give a crap what it looks like. I just want it to play in tune.
     
  15. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Well good luck with it, I’d sure like to see how it all turns out.
     
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  16. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Is the nut not low enough?
     
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  17. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    This is the guitar in question. It’s a ‘05 American Standard in Plum Purple metallic. Like I said, extremely rare, nearly impossible to find. It’s been upgraded with a set of vintage Noiseless pickups, and a two knob master volume/tone setup. It’s the “where have you been all my life” Strat. It matches the ridiculous curtains, for crying out loud.

    B34DC94B-F19F-4FCD-949D-D396509BE95B.jpeg B04F5F5E-1787-4D3C-893E-639B10BDFF96.jpeg
     
  18. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It’s plenty low. It’s just in the wrong spot.
     
  19. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Is it possible to turn the nut around? Since the mounting screws are not in the center of the nut it might be just the right compensation. Just a wild ass guess that could save some work.
     
  20. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I removed a LSR nut on a JB Strat years ago... filled it with rosewood, and recut by hand with a fretsaw and a proper width, hyper sharp chisel. Installed a bone nut. Worked perfect. Not difficult to do at all.

    If you like the LSR and want to keep it, it should be a very easy repair for a qualified luthier.
     
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