Hybrid Drum Recipe (answer to IEM?)

Discussion in 'Worship Service Players' started by SBClose, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. SBClose

    SBClose Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    168
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Location:
    Flushing,MI
    Rather than hijack Goldie's IEM thread, I'll do a write up of our hybrid drum kit as per Studio and Cap'm Crunch's request. We put this kit together AFTER we got IEMs but I think if I had made this move earlier we may not have needed to go the IEM route. If your W/L or head engineer is making noises about IEM, see if you can try this first.

    We worship in a high school size gymnasium that makes for a pretty lively sonic environment. The hybrid kit allowed us to get rid of the plexiglass drum cage and get the volume to good levels for our space. As a result, the guitar amps, keyboard amp and bass amp could be turned down without taking them offstage as drum volume was no longer the dominant force. I know running tube amps on the lower end of volume capacity may not be ideal but no one has left our church because the guitar tone was lacking.

    My regular drummers are quite happy with this arrangement because they're satisfied with the sound, the feel is familiar and the look is right. I've had a few guest drummers over the last year or so who have looked at the kit and said, "I hate electric drums". When they're packing up after playing they ask me how they can build one.

    Here's the recipe.

    We started with a run of the mill Pearl Export Kit. (Substitute whatever is on hand or what you can score cheap on CL, provided the hardware is decent.)
    Then added
    Zildjian L-80 Cymbals and Remo Silent Stroke Heads
    https://www.sweetwater.com/store/de...ckage-l80-cymbals-and-remo-silentstroke-heads

    Mixed in
    Triggers from http://www.stealthdrums.com There are a LOT of words on this website which is great if you want to learn things. Jerry was really helpful and thorough in helping me get what I needed and making sure it was installed correctly

    Added
    PinTech Percussion VHHC1000 Hi-Hat controller. This takes some fiddling to get it right. Part of the problem is the hardware that is part of our Pearl kit.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OJ97D8A/?tag=tdpri-20

    Brought it together with
    Roland TD 11 drum module sourced used on eBay. This "brain" has been around for a while, is pretty flexible, and has good aftermarket support. There are more expensive modules out there but this one was sufficient for us and Jerry at SlealthDrums endorsed its use.

    Baked it with a
    Simmons DA200S amp sourced used from Guitar Center. We run the two lines from the TD11 into this and then two outs from the amp to the house. We turn the amp up loud enough that it fills the space between the drum kit and the FOH speakers so when the drummer hits the crash your eyes and ears are in agreement rather than seeing the action on stage but hearing the result in the mains above your head.

    Total cost was under $1,500 USD (I was able to sell the plexiglass cage to recoup some of the expense)

    Sorry I don't have access to pics. Imagine a drum kit with a single cable coming out of each shell and a Blues Jr size amp sitting next to the kit.
     
    GoldieLocks likes this.
  2. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,471
    Joined:
    May 27, 2013
    Location:
    California
    Thanks!
     
  3. GoldieLocks

    GoldieLocks Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,736
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2005
    Location:
    Abbotsford B.C.
    Sounds good. triggers can be awesome.
     
  4. SBClose

    SBClose Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    168
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Location:
    Flushing,MI
    ed840c58b9792bd300e734f6314a0f39.jpg
     
    hotraman and GoldieLocks like this.
  5. black_doug

    black_doug Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,798
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Reading this makes me wonder why we use IEMs at all. The drummer plays a standard kit and sits in the centre. At one time there was a plexiglass shield in front of it but it hardly gave any shielding at the sides. That's where I stand. Now they don't even put up the shield.

    I tried going direct to PA for about six months. Now I just use my head with the cab facing up towards me on the other side.
     
  6. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,529
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, USA
    Other than the obvious difference in appearance, how does this system compare to a high end electronic drum kit say from Roland or Yamaha in terms of playability and sound?

    I personally prefer acoustic drums if the musicians are monitoring each other "acoustically", i.e stage volume with a little wedge support for vocals. If you are using IEM's, however, there really is no reason to use an acoustic kit.

    Edit: I just checked out the links. Cool stuff.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
  7. SBClose

    SBClose Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    168
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Location:
    Flushing,MI
    Hey Cap, in terms of playability and sound... as I mentioned the Roland TD11 is pretty flexible so we were able to take most of an afternoon and custom build a kit within the module. We messed with a bunch of parameters to get the decay, reverb, tone, pitch, etc. that we felt worked well with our room and style. If you stood in the house and closed your eyes you couldn't tell the difference between our kit and a decently tuned acoustic set except perhaps that the sound source is more focused coming from the amp.

    Our goal was to set up ONE default kit that we knew would be the same every time we turned it on. If you were setting up a studio or traveling kit where you wanted to be able to change everything, a different kit for every song or the ability to make bird noises from your drum kit, there are certainly options with more bells and whistles and buttons and outputs.

    The skins feel right. They tighten up nicely and have a realistic response. The cymbals don't feel as good but once you start playing them, you kinda forget about it.
     
    CapnCrunch likes this.
  8. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,529
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, USA
    I didn't see that you were using the Roland, though I see it now. If you have people committed to make this type of kit work, it creates lots of options for the band and the sound person. The first real band that I played in, the band leader was the bass player and lead vocalist. He really hammered on everyone to keep stage volume down. If you couldn't hear the vocals or the other guitar player or keys, then you turned yourself down until you could. If the drums got too loud, he would really let the drummer have it. The drums really determine how loud the stage environment needs to be.

    With the type of kit you put together, it would be really easy to keep amp and monitor volumes well below the sound guy's threshold level, so I agree with you, IEM's would be really unnecessary with this type of kit. Also, if you already run IEM's, this type of kit is also ideal since there is no need for the musicians to monitor the drums acoustically. It's a win/win.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.