Hurricane Ian on the horizon.

El Tele Lobo

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Florida
good news .. I'm alive.
bad news .. this building isn't.

we had a minimum 8' surge.
generator died which actually turned out to be fortunate. That's because even though our flood doors held, water pushed in through low electrical and drain pipes under the tech floors where all the power junctions are. So we avoided burned out equipment, fire, and possibility of someone being electrocuted.

more bad news, I need to pee .. there's no working facilities 😮🥺

I'll upload one photo, cell service is struggling.

View attachment 1034356

that barrier is waist high -after- ground and parking elevation. btw, there is a car out there under the water.

Hang in there, Nicole. We are praying for you. This is so awful. Please stay safe.
 

Telekarster

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Earth
good news .. I'm alive.
bad news .. this building isn't.

we had a minimum 8' surge.
generator died which actually turned out to be fortunate. That's because even though our flood doors held, water pushed in through low electrical and drain pipes under the tech floors where all the power junctions are. So we avoided burned out equipment, fire, and possibility of someone being electrocuted.

more bad news, I need to pee .. there's no working facilities 😮🥺

I'll upload one photo, cell service is struggling.

View attachment 1034356

that barrier is waist high -after- ground and parking elevation. btw, there is a car out there under the water.

Very glad you're safe Nicole! Gosh... I hardly know what to say. Just glad ya'll survived it!
 

deytookerjaabs

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Maryland
FYI, here's "the models" from a couple days ago, even yesterday most had the eye west of Tampa landing further north:

UaU0JgFl.jpg


Very erratic making it hard as heck to tell if you're going to just get some outer bands versus getting completely hammered.
 

getbent

Telefied
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San Benito County, California
Here on the east coast, we were stuck in outer band rain all morning. Just training on us. About 6” of rain, and that rain brings the winds down to the surface. So we had sustained 35mph with gust to 55.

Now we’ve been dry for half an hour. But the worst of what’s left will come right over us in the middle of the night tonight.

Godspeed to you guys experiencing the eyewall right now. Video of storm surge starting to come in…

Heres a live feed of Naples pier. I’m surprised the pier isn’t severely damaged already.



edit - that live cam went dead about 12:37 EDT

be safe mi amigo!
 

dkmw

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Waking up to see storm exiting east coast right over us. With the help of some rum, I slept through the worst of it here.

The light of day will reveal the wake of this one. And there may be more to come in terms of rainfall for those north of us. But Florida is almost done with Ian.
 

dustoff pilot

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Vermont
My wife left the week before last from our home in Cape Coral to travel to VT for business reasons and she stopped at the our daughter's home in North GA to visit on the way back. I evacuated this past Saturday and beat the rush. Our next door neighbor who did not leave let us know this morning that we weren't flooded. We have a home on a canal in SW Cape Coral and I can't believe we weren't hit with the surge. I fully expected to lose the house and that my neighbor who stayed wouldn't survive. I thought I used up all my luck in Viet Nam, Bosnia and Iraq but must have had a bit left over! Steve
 

MarkieMark

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Eastern USA
Son and family in Ft. Myers, surprised by the turn. Rode it out. Modern code construction and storm shutters helped, but still a very scary ride. Power out but all safe.
Parents in Lakeland, Talked to them just before sundown, said they couldn't even see the boat dock on the lake behind them- (about twenty footsteps to the dock)
I'll be checking in on them again shortly. They have ridden out worse- but will expect a big cleanup with tree loss/damage.
Friends in Venice- worried about them. EVERYTHING is out.
Family all up the east coast- waiting...
 

NoTeleBob

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Southwestern, USA
Son and family in Ft. Myers, surprised by the turn. Rode it out. Modern code construction and storm shutters helped, but still a very scary ride. Power out but all safe.
Parents in Lakeland, Talked to them just before sundown, said they couldn't even see the boat dock on the lake behind them- (about twenty footsteps to the dock)
I'll be checking in on them again shortly. They have ridden out worse- but will expect a big cleanup with tree loss/damage.
Friends in Venice- worried about them. EVERYTHING is out.
Family all up the east coast- waiting...

Main storm is well north of Lakeland now. Still raining, still windy.
 

jman72

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Central Florida
I'm not being sarcastic or snide. Florida is sinking (Miami) , You get blasted every year by hurricanes , invasive species: iguanas , pythons and anacondas , have you ever considered moving to table top flat states with actual weather cycles?
I moved here 15 years ago for my job (I'm a college professor- these jobs are few and far between, so you have to go wherever you can get a position). I love most things about living in Florida, but even if I wanted to move- well, my job is here, so I'm here. And once Halloween rolls around, we get 6 months of fantastic weather while those table top flat states are shoveling snow and scraping windshields. I'll take the occasional storm over that.:)
 

joe.attaboy

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FYI, here's "the models" from a couple days ago, even yesterday most had the eye west of Tampa landing further north:

UaU0JgFl.jpg


Very erratic making it hard as heck to tell if you're going to just get some outer bands versus getting completely hammered.
I worked in a local Naval Weather facility for 8 years. Their primary mission was aviation support and support of a number of local base weather detachments in the southeast Atlantic and the Gulf. I was the IT director, but I learned a lot about how hurricanes work, as we were responsible for hurricane conditions of readiness for the region, so that activity was one of our primary activities between May and October.

One thing I learned is that while the initial tracks from the current storm location can be accurate in general direction (like the lower third of the track in the image),
tracking beyond 36-48 hours can be a crap shoot. Those spaghetti tracks are based on very large computers running millions of mathematical calculations on the potential directions of a storm, but the hurricane doesn't know this. So, beyond that 48-hour period, the tracks are at best a numerically educated guess.

The NHC track (the one you see all over TV) is frequently based on a combination of a few of the big tracks to try to get a general idea. Interestingly, the one track that ended up being pretty accurate this time was the UKMET, which showed the storm moving pretty much the way it did.

People down here seem to be aware that the movements of hurricanes are often difficult to predict, so if the landfall is predicted in Tampa, for example, you can bet if you live anywhere from Apalachicola in the bend to the Keys, you better pay attention and prepare to move.
 

joe.attaboy

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In case anyone cares, my area (NE Florida, south of Jacksonville) appears to have escaped the kind of disaster folks are seeing south and west of here. We've had wind and rain all night, but nothing damaged here. However, we have some areas that have flooding issues in big storms, and they may still feel some impact as it moves just south of us out to the water. I also haven't been out this morning, so haven't had the chance to see the area, but it's one of those days it's best to just stay in. No power loss. Ian still has to pass us to the east after it moves out over the Atlantic later today, so we may have impacts from the western side of the TS as it heads north.

My next concern is if it re-strengthens as my daughter's family lives in Savannah, which is expected to be affected late Friday. They have a standing order to immediately head here if necessary.

Also, the name "Ian" will most likely be retired from the repeating names list due to the devastation of this evil bastard.
 

jman72

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FYI, here's "the models" from a couple days ago, even yesterday most had the eye west of Tampa landing further north:

UaU0JgFl.jpg


Very erratic making it hard as heck to tell if you're going to just get some outer bands versus getting completely hammered.
Just imagine living here 100 years ago when your first clue that a hurricane was coming was when the waters started surging and the winds and rains came howling. No warning and no escape by that time. Big storms killed THOUSANDS because of this (8000-12000 people died from storm surge in the 1900 hurricane in Galveston).

These computer models are predicting pretty much the most complex, interconnected systems on the planet, and while they're not "perfect", I'll take the days of advance notice on the general direction of a storm over getting creamed out of the blue by a Cat 5 any day.
 

deytookerjaabs

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Jun 5, 2015
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Maryland
Just imagine living here 100 years ago when your first clue that a hurricane was coming was when the waters started surging and the winds and rains came howling. No warning and no escape by that time. Big storms killed THOUSANDS because of this (8000-12000 people died from storm surge in the 1900 hurricane in Galveston).

These computer models are predicting pretty much the most complex, interconnected systems on the planet, and while they're not "perfect", I'll take the days of advance notice on the general direction of a storm over getting creamed out of the blue by a Cat 5 any day.

I remember seeing a documentary interview with an old lady in southern Louisiana talking about how people used to climb up the trees then tie themselves to the tree with a rope.
 

deytookerjaabs

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Maryland
Just imagine living here 100 years ago when your first clue that a hurricane was coming was when the waters started surging and the winds and rains came howling. No warning and no escape by that time. Big storms killed THOUSANDS because of this (8000-12000 people died from storm surge in the 1900 hurricane in Galveston).

These computer models are predicting pretty much the most complex, interconnected systems on the planet, and while they're not "perfect", I'll take the days of advance notice on the general direction of a storm over getting creamed out of the blue by a Cat 5 any day.

No, we know they're not perfect. But, if you're one of those who is "watching" to see where it goes in this particular hurricane it was really the last 24-12 hours where we saw it headed that far south. Not a lot of time to prep for those who avoided evac orders thinking it was going to track north.
 




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