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Hunting, how do you do it ? Not the hunt, but the other things.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Sep 29, 2020.

  1. ViciousDoctor

    ViciousDoctor TDPRI Member

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    I once liked to hunt but when I started working in restaurant kitchens it somehow lost its appeal, headcheese on the other hand is freaking delicious i have made my own a few times, mostly just to freak out my ex wife with the pigs head tho...now the divorce makes sense
     
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  2. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    And yes, I have eaten headcheese... Definitely not a taste I have acquired yet...
     
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  3. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    I hunt the deer that inhabit my property.
    I hunt with either a bow and arrow or a rifle, depending on what part of the season is ongoing.
    I either stalk, or sit and wait in a stand placed in a preselected location.
    I have eaten game on the same day it was taken, but ordinarily I bring deer to a local processor.
    I prefer venison to any other red meat.

    Yes, I’ve eaten hog head cheese. My maternal grandfather was a butcher and had a knack for making it.
    I have a handwritten copy of his recipe, but I can’t duplicate it.
     
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  4. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    Most people I know who hunt ask permission from a landowner, or they are the landowner.
     
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  5. stormsedge

    stormsedge Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Required by law everywhere I've ever hunted. In TN, one must have written permission on your person to hunt another's land...TWRA provides a specific permission signature card to that end.
     
  6. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Why can't you ? i guess this is the kind of recipes that stay in the family right ?
     
  7. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    There is something that happens to the grain structure and the connective tissue of meat as it ages that enhances flavors and tenderizes the texture. Strident flavors become more mellow and refined. I've forgotten the whole science of it, but any grocery store butcher ought to be able to explain it to you. The whole food prep side of it is where the art happens. If you are French, then I'm sure you've heard that your whole life. You guys know how to eat. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
  8. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    I can’t duplicate it exactly.
    He wrote it down from memory one day for my Uncle. It probably is his best recollection at the time, but I imagine he couldn’t verbalize all the process. Difficult to describe years of experience.
     
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  9. Allan Allan

    Allan Allan Tele-Holic

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    My dad would wake me up and it was still dark. I'd put on all the clothes in the world, then we'd drive somewhere and he'd set me up then go to his own spot. He'd say don't move or make noise because you'll scare the deer. I'd sit in the cold and see nothing and be cold, very very cold. Eventually he'd come back and ask if I saw anything, he never saw anything either.

    It was great.
     
  10. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    Not a hunter, much. I like to fish. There's a whole lot of regional variations, across the US. Bear in mind that Texas alone is the size of France, and I say that as a non-Texan.

    Spent a weekend on a big ranch in South Texas, as a guest of a corporation. Sort of client schmoozing. Little deer stands dotted all over a many-thousand acre spread (another word for ranch) (think 2,000 to 4,000 hectares), with a hunting lodge. Yeah, not exactly roughing it. The local ranch hands drive you (in a small ATV) to a little hut - with openings on all four sides, where you can rest your rifle on the window ledge and just wait. So, not really "hunting", but "waiting".

    The deer wander through and you wait until one presents you with a shot that will do the job. Nothing more cruel than to be a bad harvester. If you shoot well, there is only a short tracking to find where the animal died. I grew up in the mountains, so following things is something that you do out of curiosity, I guess. So the deer I shot went maybe 50, 60 yards into the scrub oak, where I found it.

    Since this was S. Texas and the little whitetails there are not much larger than a dog, I'll I had to do was drag it over to the side of the dirt track ranch road and wait for the afternoon pickup. When they came to pick me up, they scolded me for doing the tracking! I was supposed to just wait and let the ranch hands do the work. I told them I would prefer to walk back to the lodge. I'd had enough waiting.

    About two weeks later, a cooler showed up at work, nice little cuts and ground meat to make chili with. That was the last time I did that.

    Another version, brother in Montana. It's a weeklong event or a long weekend. Horses, campsites, whisky around the campfire. They actually go out hunting every morning, on National Forest lands with permits from the State of Montana. Camping in tent or just sleeping in the back of a truck.

    In his part of the woods they are hunting larger mule deer, some elk, etc. In this version, there may have been some pre-hunt scouting involved. This is not fenced in land - and a certain familiarity with the how and why of what animals do is required. You maybe walking, slowly or finding a vantage point. Being quiet is a great skill. Knowing which way the wind blows, etc. There's a whole range of skills - some more seasoned hunter can explain it all.

    If you hunt well, a horse may be needed to bring the animal back, but once the deceased animal is found, then it is field dressed; disarticulated into carrying size pieces. Most people of hunting persuasion learn how to do this as kids or teenagers. Large coolers are at the campsite, plus everyone typically has a large freezer at home.

    The field dressed animal may be taken to a local store/butcher who prepares the animal for home use, or some folks do their own and make their own sausage. The sausage making may be a family event or a hunting buddy event.

    Last version, my ex-inlaws from South Louisiana - went duck hunting on the uncle's rice farm, in a little slough with cattails and alligators. Well, at least that's what they told me in advance to wind me up a little. There were cattails.

    I borrowed the F-I-L's shotgun, a single shot weapon of dubious efficiency, particularly in my hands. Where I was waiting, no ducks ever came close enough, but a couple of the cousins shot a few. We had duck for dinner that night.

    EDIT: yes, headcheese. It's in the grocery stores, not a common menu item, exactly. There are places in S. Louisiana - which is a part of the US that has some French influence - that offer their special version of it. I like it fine, but not enough to buy it at the grocery. I guess there's some variation on how large the tiny pieces of meat are and how much filler goes in.

    Here's one version from Louisiana:
    Teets head cheese.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
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  11. Crowcaster

    Crowcaster Tele-Holic

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    Pronghorn season opens for us this Friday. I have a bit of a drive, so I'm planning on staying 3 nights. If I'm not successful, I'll try and go back the last weekend of the season (takes a while to draw a pronghorn tag in ND).

    Hunting public land.

    Usually I'd stay in a hotel with cable tv and free breakfast, but because of Covid, I plan on camping, but it's supposed to get down to 35 degrees Fahrenheit! :eek: And it gets dark around 7 PM, so I guess I have to go to bed with the chickens!

    I hope for an honest, spot and stalk hunt, but pronghorn alot of times are just seen driving around and when you've driven 7 hrs to get there and it's near freezing at night, you do what ya gotta do.

    Never eaten head cheese. And if I get one, I process it into steaks, roasts, and grind up the rest with pork and make sausage.
     
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  12. Crowcaster

    Crowcaster Tele-Holic

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    We need some pictures....

    A few mule deer pics.

    2013 Mule Deer.jpg
    2015 Mule Deer.jpg
    2018 Mule Deer.jpg
     
  13. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Friend of Leo's

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    There are so many different answers to these questions. I can't tell you many people think that hunting involves just walking into the woods, chit-chatting with your bud the whole way, smoking a cigar, and then just noticing a deer over yonder, nonchalantly shouldering your rifle, and shooting the deer right then and there. I guess that's how it is in the movies. And perhaps for a price a dude ranch can give you that experience.

    The guys I hunt with (and our children) have probably put in several hundred hours of work this year, and nobody has even fired a shot yet. Most of it has been setting up new stands (and shoring up existing ones) in the trees to hunt from. Then there's getting the guns sighted in, ammo squared away, etc. So...it's a lot of work just getting ready to go hunt, but it's hard/honest/rewarding/etc kind of work.

    At the same time, some people just get off work/school (or go before), drive out to the state game land, hike in, and bag a deer.

    There are various seasons for hunting, but you're right, a lot of times it can be cold...for big game hunting anyway. I think I remember them saying the last time I was at a hunter's safety course that the #1 cause of hunting deaths (or maybe just outdoor deaths in general) was freezing to death...seriously.
     
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  14. rghill

    rghill Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I have only gone bird hunting. Just go out to your favorite spot, walk around, and hopefully bag a few quail.

    Other friends were into it big time. My son was drawn for deer, and set up a camp with a few other people. It becomes quite a party. I was invited up the last time, but couldn't make it. I guess I would have hiked out with my son and help out if he managed to bring down a deer.

    Not much interest in hunting deer or elk myself, as I would find it difficult to shoot one. But I have taken some meat before. Elk roast is very good.
     
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  15. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    Pretty much my experience exactly.

    Once when we got back to my dad's Econoline at the end of a long day of standing in the freezing rain, I was covered in a sheet of ice- I had to shake the ice off my clothes before getting in. As we sat shivering, waiting for the heater to kick in, my dad said "you know, it's not even about the hunting. I just like being in the woods in bad weather. If you tell people you're going for a hike in the freezing rain, they'll think you're crazy. Take a rifle and tell them you're hunting, it's totally fine." I completely understood, because I felt the same way.
     
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  16. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    An acquaintance of mine was an avid motorcycle roadracer. At a family dinner his dad went on a rant about how expensive the "thropies" were... he told his father that they were less per pound then the venison they were eating.
     
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  17. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    There is not that much hunting here in the southeastern US that occurs at the end of summer and early fall. Doves, squirrels, and archer for deer are the only ones I can think of that are in at the moment. Most hunting here occurs later in the fall and in the winter.

    We generally can fish here in the SE year around and many do. The best "inshore" salt water fishing is during the cooler months so there is a conflict of how to use one's time.

    Different species require different approaches and there are wide variations that require learning and the use of different equipment. Hunting alligators in the SE US is far different that hunting upland game birds in the plains states with dogs (which is my favorite).

    Je suis un chasseur d'oiseaux.

    By the way, the French, particularly royals and aristocrats, played a significant role in developing pointing breeds that can smell birds and point them.

    https://www.outdoorlife.com/these-hunters-have-perfected-upland-bird-hunting-road-trip/
     
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  18. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    It is best to skin and clean a large game animal fairly soon, but not necessarily best to eat it right away. I prefer to put the meat in an ice chest with the valve open for 5 days or so to allow the myoglobin to continually drain as the ice is refreshed each day. If it is really cold, one can hang meat a day or two before putting it on ice.
     
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  19. Buell

    Buell Tele-Meister

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    I grew up hunting. Rabbit, squirrel, pheasant, grouse and deer. In the midwest US, especially northern Minnesota, 99% of deer hunters are actually supplementing their food bill and not just killing for sport. Many prefer venison to beef.

    The way it's done up here is, get up and out to your "stand" before daylight and sit. And sit. And sit. And sit. That might go on for an hour or two or for days. Patience and timing is what it comes down to. I always bring a book to read and enjoy the other sights and sounds while waiting. You CAN eat whatever part of the deer right away, if you want. We tend to butcher and package everything and leave out a couple of steaks for a celebratory meal. 1 or 2 deer will last my family most of the year, so well worth it.
     
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  20. CajunJ

    CajunJ Tele-Holic

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    Hogs head cheese is one of my favorite things in the fall, along with a few dozen fresh shucked oysters. Bourgeois meat market in Louisiana has the best.
     
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