Hunting, how do you do it ? Not the hunt, but the other things.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Sep 29, 2020.

  1. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't want to know if you kill animals, or what sort of weapon you use.
    Beware, i am not a hunter, so those questions might be stupid.

    But i am curious about how you do it. Do you go camping for 2 or 3 days in the woods ? With friends ? or is it just a hunter and his dog trying to get the game to where his hunter friends are for a day ?

    Since hunting happens in the end of summer, early fall, what do you have for breakfast since it is going cold ? I have seen some people eating oats in the morning, but here only horses eat oats.

    I guess if you go for the big game, it is only a one day thing because you have got to bring the game back to your vehicle.

    You can't really kill a buck in the morning, skin it and eat it at dinner right ? You have got to let the meat in the fridge, or in the smoker for while ?

    And do you share with friends or sell the meat once you killed something ? Sell some, give some ?

    Last question, have you ever eaten headcheese ?
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    Take it easy folks. No locking of this one if you please.
     
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  2. Jake Nelson

    Jake Nelson Tele-Meister

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    Most places that I hunt at are within 30 minutes from the house so I get up at super dark:30 and make a big breakfast like bacon, eggs, fried potatoes and toast then hit the tree stand at least an hour before first light. If I harvest a deer in the morning I will eat the tenderloin for supper, if in the evening I will eat the tenderloin fried for breakfast the next morning.
    I like to give some meat away but most of it gets used at home. You can’t sell game meat here in Minnesota.
    Waterfowl is similar but I’m usually with more people.
    I haven’t had headcheese but my dad always talked about how well he liked it.
     
  3. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Lots of folks donate some or all of their venison to food pantry-type deals
     
  4. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Speaking as a native man, like dis:

    :lol:

    unnamed.jpg
     
  5. SamIV

    SamIV Tele-Holic

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    Don't hunt, but I do eat Hog's Head Cheese. I am from south Louisiana.
     
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  6. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't hunt very much anymore (just kinda got over being uncomfortable all the time) but the things about it that seem very common is that it is a very social pursuit and very regional. How someone hunts in the Midwest states of the US may be very different than the way they hunt in your part of France. The game also influences hunting habits. Most people who duck hunt go out early in the morning and sit in a blind for a few hours with their buddies and wait for ducks to come in. Deer hunters in Illinois may go to a deer stand early mornings alone and still go to work that day. Up where I live, we do day hunts for deer, but what I'm most familiar with is going to a cabin for several days with a group of people. I hear that some people do use deer stands, but we most always just walk. Walking is way warmer and more fun than sitting dead still for hours on end thinking about how cold and uncomfortable you are, although I'm sure we scare away more game than we see. Duck hunters up here also go to a blind or a hide (ironically) right around our airport. Other game species like rabbit may just involve you and some friends walking through some fields and waiting for one to bolt out of cover. Pheasant hunters largely do this as well.

    Once you get something, your primary responsibility is to care for the meat. You should have a plan to field dress it, maybe hang it in camp somewhere, remove the hyde and transport it home. Once its at home, if its a deer or a moose, it will hang in a cool dry place for several days to let the meat age and then be butchered (unheated garage or shed. You want it chilled, but not frozen). Or you may elect to just take it to a butcher or processor to turn into whatever cuts of meat you prefer. It is common and socially encouraged to share the game with other people. You can give some meat to a neighbor or friend, share your game with a hunting partner or otherwise just use it as an ingredient in a dish for parties or dinners. Lots of people make sausage and bring it in to work to share with co-workers.

    That's the limit of my experience. Wild game is usually very lean and has unique flavor profiles but is essentially meat. People hunt for food, but more importantly they hunt to keep their traditions alive. Those traditions include harvesting a particular species of game, preserving it, preparing it. There's a very special feeling you get when you are eating game that you harvested and preserved yourself. You can't help but feel connected to the land in a much deeper way than before. And if you enjoy cooking, then game meat adds a challenge to the dish.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
  7. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Like the nuge ? I read Parkman's the oregon trail, and this is pretty much what i pictured in my head. With a lot more buffalos and native americans.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    A case of beer, 3 burritos and about 10 beef sticks... what was the question?
     
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  9. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah head cheese come from hogs. My grandparents used to make some, but i was too young to remember that.
    Boil the pig's head, scrap the meat, mix in some carottes, and persil, and there you go.

    I still remember my uncle making boudin, drinking white wine, and blowing in the stuff like he was about to make a dog balloon.

    [​IMG]

    He never got to that result though.
     
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  10. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I'm a kale hunter, I just strip the stalks and steam the leaves...
     
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  11. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Friend of Leo's

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    I don't hunt. I find no sport in killing.

    If I did anything close to hunting (say, more than catching a fish or smashing a cockroach), it would probably consist of me walking out my front door, close range shooting one of several deer standing in my front yard, then taking it to get skin and processed by someone else so I can eat bambi steaks and bambi sausage all winter.

    We have an overpopulation of deer here.
     
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  12. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've never hunted with a dog, but I've known people who do. That is a yearround activity given that the dog is constantly being trained or run to kept sharp. Some are pets, others it is very clear are work dogs and are kept in a kennel or an area mostly away from the family. Those types of dogs are work animals and really come alive on a hunt. They are also usually doted on by their owners. And they are annoying as hell to live near since they get easily excited in their kennels and howl at odd hours of the day. No thanks.
     
  13. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not long ago, a girl was walking her mutt in the woods, and there was some kind of hunting with hounds going on but like medieval times, and she died. So far, no one could tell if the hounds, or the mutt killed her. Or a combination of both.

    Got to be careful.
     
  14. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Don't forget to have some nuts and saddles made... :lol:
     
  15. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    Weird. I know nothing about hunting with hounds. But that's also the whole point of capturing and putting down stray dogs. Dogs will pack up and become very dangerous. I grew up in Illinois and it wasn't unusual for dogs that get dumped out in the country to attack livestock. Their instinct is to hunt cooperatively.
     
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  16. Speedfish

    Speedfish Tele-Holic

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    My father has a 40+ acre farm where my sons hunt. There is a house there with a full working kitchen, so they eat what you would normally eat on a day to day basis. My father likes to treat them to pizza, buffalo wings, baked salmon, etc,..
    The stands or blinds that they hunt from are a short walk from the house. When they harvest a deer they usually load it on the back of a Kawasaki Mule and transport it to where they skin and dress it. They have also used the bucket on the front of a John Deere tractor for transport.
    Yes, you can prepare the meat and eat it the same day that you hunt, but they usually refrigerate the first day, then butcher on another day before packaging and placing it into a freezer for future use.
     
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  17. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Because the meat is too chewy if you eat right away ? I have heard that you can't eat game meat before it got a bit old.
     
  18. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Not a hunter but, I use to hunt and fish... The sky is the limit, if game is nearby, a "dayhunt" is perfectly fine. So, yes you could be off for a hunt early in the day and have BBQ that night. The possibilities are endless beyond that.
     
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  19. stormsedge

    stormsedge Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    The last ten years I've hunted alone (I recently joined a sportsmans club to put an end to that foolishness). I count a good day as being in the woods...and a great day as seeing any kind of big game or fur bearers.
    I do not have to take an animal to have a great day, and have passed on many because I wasn't hungry or it wasn't a perfect shot arrangement.
    I'm currently within an hour of my hunting area. I usually go early AM (dark) and stay out until I have to start stripping clothes off to stay cool enough, then go back to the truck for lunch, and sometimes a nap. If it is cool enough, I'll walk/still hunt in the afternoon (deer) until dark...if too warm, I'll head home.
    I eat a variety of things...I have eaten oatmeal ;).
    I haven't hunted over dogs since I was a kid, but am now in a club that uses dogs for bear and hogs (haven't tried it yet).
    I share the take with friends, and our club has a large freezer where meat may be designated for give-away or use in club suppers.
    I do not recall ever eating headcheese...but there are some times I do not recall :oops:.
     
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  20. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Depends on the meat, the processing and or the preparation...
     
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